The Da Vinci code

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by LDfan, Jan 21, 2004.

  1. LDfan

    LDfan Supporting Actor

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    Has anyone read this book? If not then I highly suggest it. I read it in about 3 days.
    After reading it I had to take some 2nd looks at some of the paintings mentioned, especially the Last Supper. Any other thoughts on it?

    Jeff
     
  2. Tony Whalen

    Tony Whalen Producer

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    Have yet to read it, but my wife just picked up a copy after several family members raved about it. I'm looking forward to it after what little I've heard. [​IMG]
     
  3. Chuck C

    Chuck C Cinematographer

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    I heard it's like crack....once you start reading, you can't stop.
     
  4. Holadem

    Holadem Lead Actor

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    Same here. I am not into comtemporary fiction writers (except King), but I am definitely intrigued. I got it for a friend a couple of weeks ago, and she pretty much read it overnight.

    --
    H
     
  5. Chuck Mayer

    Chuck Mayer Lead Actor

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    I liked it, but felt it's premise was stronger and more realized than it's finale. It's a very well-written book, and it certainly piqued my curiousity. I do highly recommend it, though I enjoyed the middle a lot more than the end.

    Soon to be a Ron Howard film coming this Christmas, I believe....

    Take care,
    Chuck
     
  6. Chris

    Chris Lead Actor

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    It's not bad, though the ending is a let down; I can't sa it really hit me as a "great book" .. it didn't involve me as say, any of the Harry Potter books, but it was interesting throughout and had very good pacing.
     
  7. Dan D.

    Dan D. Stunt Coordinator

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    I really enjoyed the book and thought the story highly intriguing, though I thought the writing style was a bit lacking. Definitely a fun read though.

    His prequel to this book, "Angels and Demons", is equally fun, possibly even more so, plus it explains some of the events alluded to in "The Da Vinci Code"

    Check out www.danbrown.com. He actually has photos of all the stuff he writes about in both books.

    Also, if you like this kind of story, read "The Eight" by Katherine Harris. Absolutely outstanding.
     
  8. Craig Robertson

    Craig Robertson Supporting Actor

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    yep. great read and with the short chapters you think "i can read just one more."

    like Dan D., I also very much enjoyed "Angels and Demons".
     
  9. Mark Dubbelboer

    Mark Dubbelboer Screenwriter

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    I read the da vinci code like half a year ago or so. I liked it, sometimes dan brown tends to use cliches when he's being dramatic but i can look past that.

    Angels and Demons was very good as well. I'd recommend it to those of you that are waiting for family members to finish the DaVinci code.
    I picked up digital fortress the other day, haven't had a chance to start to read it yet though.
     
  10. Dave Falasco

    Dave Falasco Screenwriter

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    Hmm, I just finished Angels and Demons and I was disappointed by it. I thought it wasn't nearly as well-written as The DaVinci Code. Both books were enjoyable, but I felt the second one was much stronger and better written. Probably because it had a far less sci-fi premise. Not that I have anything against sci-fi (quite the contrary, actually), but what made TDVC so thrilling was the possibility that what Brown was saying might actually be true, whereas the concepts in A&D where just too far out (antimatter, space planes, etc.)


    You are my freaking hero, Dan! I didn't think anyone had ever heard of this little book, but I agree completely--it was one of the best I have ever read. Great call!

    [edit]Hah, and now that I've clicked on Dan's link, I see that those 'sci-fi' concepts aren't so "fi" after all. :b
     
  11. Marc_Sulinski

    Marc_Sulinski Supporting Actor

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    If you look on his website, he indicates that the space plane actually exists and is in limited use today. He also claims that anitmatter is real.
     
  12. DonRoeber

    DonRoeber Screenwriter

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    I recently read the Davinci code, and I really enjoyed it. The ultra-short chapters were a bit annoying though, I prefer real chapters. I felt like I was reading a movie, which has it's merits, but also it's downfalls.

    I'm a big fan of books that questions modern religous ideologoies. Anyone have any suggestions? I'll check out Dan Brown's other works, and The Eight by Katherine Harris.
     
  13. Matt Gordon

    Matt Gordon Supporting Actor

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    I spent a lot of time a couple months ago reading about the book, about the (real) people in the book, and about the theories and archaeology behind the book.

    Two words about The Da Vinci Code:

    Poor research.



    Uh, make that three:

    Very poor research.


    To say anything more on the topic would be a violation of forum rules. [​IMG]
     
  14. Angelo.M

    Angelo.M Producer

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    The book is a pale imitation of Eco's Focault's Pendulum, without a fraction of Eco's scholarship.
     
  15. Dave Falasco

    Dave Falasco Screenwriter

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    Except that it's infinitely more readable for the average person. I loved "The Name of the Rose", but damn, Umberto is tough to read sometimes. And "Focault's Pendulum" is exhibit A for that statement.
     
  16. Angelo.M

    Angelo.M Producer

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    Dave, I totally agree. But Pendulum is a more rewarding read, in my opinion, if you stick with it and skim a few parts. Just pack a lunch, and dinner, and breakfast...
     
  17. Carlo Medina

    Carlo Medina Executive Producer

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    History is written by the winners and as such, what is established as truth now makes everything counter to it seem false. I took 2 courses in religious studies (I think I still have the texts if I did around for them) at a major and well-respected American University and I can say that quite a lot of what he puts in this book has some basis in archaeological and historical findings. No one knows what's "true" or not as the events happened hundreds and thousands of years ago.

    If Germany had won WWII our view of history would be very different right now. The concept of "Axis and Allies" would have been turned on its head.

    If England had won the revolutionary war, the U.S. Founding Fathers would be seen as traitors and outlaws who were most likely executed after their attempted insurrection.

    Sure, Brown's premises run counter to what is commonly accepted, but to just dismiss him out of hand like that is, in my opinion, inappropriate. Furthermore, he never suggests that his work is non-fiction, so he does take liberties with the archaelogical evidence that his book uses as a "jumping off" point.
     
  18. Carlo Medina

    Carlo Medina Executive Producer

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    Oh, BTW, I always wondered what the heck this Da Vinci Code was, and why it seemed to be on the bestseller list for what seemed an eternity.

    Skeptically I picked it up and started reading it. The "crack" analogy is correct. It shouldn't take someone more than 4 days to read this.
     
  19. Jon_Are

    Jon_Are Cinematographer

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    The first four or so pages grabbed my attention immediately and I strapped myself in for a great ride.

    It was all downhill from there, however. I was put off by Brown's forced style and what I perceived as his urge to speak to the reader as if he (Brown) were some sort of expert on all things French, historic, artistic, etc. In other words, I felt "talked-down-to".

    It didn't help that, as he rattled off coincidences and "proof" of the historic (factual?) facets of his story, much of what was related was a very long stretch. I kept thinking of those old lists of the incredible coincidences between Lincoln and Kennedy (you know, "Lincoln has seven letters in his last name...and KENNEDY HAS SEVEN LETTERS IN HIS LAST NAME!!")

    Aside from all that, Brown's writing talent is, at best, mediocre.

    Jon
     
  20. DonRoeber

    DonRoeber Screenwriter

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    Yeah, I read Focault's Pendulum when I was in high school. I can't remember how or why I got the book. I think I have it around somewhere, maybe I'll read it again. I remember enjoying it.
     

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