The Cinematography Discussion #1

Discussion in 'Movies' started by JohnRice, Mar 14, 2002.

  1. JohnRice

    JohnRice Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2000
    Messages:
    8,813
    Likes Received:
    207
    Real Name:
    John
    I am reviving this thread in preparation for the second discussion, which is starting soon http://www.hometheaterforum.com/htforum/showthread.php?s=&postid=1605575#post1605575The Man in the Moon

    Dir.
    Robert Mulligan D.P. Freddie Francis

    Discussion led by: John Rice



    Regardless of your opinion of The Man in the Moon as a film, it is undeniable that its photography is nothing short of stunning. The composition is always interesting, dynamic and creative, the lighting has an almost fantasy look, and the colors have a rich and lush quality that I usually only expect from the classic Technicolor films of the past.
    [​IMG]Klute

    Dir. Alan J. Pakula D.P. Gordon Willis

    Discussion led by: PatrickL



    A highly unique detective thriller that manipulates film noir conventions to explore social issues, "Klute" is especially outstanding for Gordon Willis' distinctive cinematography. It is a fine example of Willis' genius, demonstrating how he can make bold and unusual photographic choices with light and with composition, and still remain rigorously attuned to creating the cinematography that best expresses the story.
    [​IMG]Oliver Twist (1948)

    Dir. David Lean D.P. Guy Green

    Discussion led by: Agee Bassett



    Oliver Twist is a milestone in black-and-white movie photography as an expressive medium. A superbly stylish exercise in the use of monochrome, light, shadow, form, texture, shape, composition and motion as character analysis and dramatic storytelling, Guy GreenÕs phantasmagoric visions bring to vivid and controversial life the dark, violent overtones eschewed by other, more timid film adaptations of DickensÕ work. Selected by film and David Lean scholar Alain Silver as a textbook illustration of Andre BazinÕs Three Forms of Cinematic Reality.
    [​IMG]Out of Sight

    Dir. Steven Soderbergh D.P. Elliot Davis

    Discussion led by: Seth Paxton



    Soderbergh is a hands-on director and this shows in that while the cinematographers change from film to film, the visual style in each film does not. Thus while Traffic was known for it's "city based" color schemes we had already seen it before in Out of Sight. However, it's more than just locations or temperatures being displayed, it's moods. Along with that are excellent examples of his ability to mix steady-cam shots with fixed or tracking shots, long shots and medium close-ups, and of course freeze frames on scene transitions. In short, Out of Sight is perhaps the best "definitive" example of all of Soderbergh's work.
    [​IMG]Vertigo

    Dir. Alfred Hitchcock D.P. Robert Burks

    Discussion led by: George Kaplan



    Vertigo is a film with that classic stylized Hitchcock/Robert Burks look that mark his classic fifties color films. It is also innovative, including the 'vertigo' effect itself, later used in other films (such as Jaws). And thanks to the Harris/Katz restoration, we can see this beautiful film the way it originally looked.
    [/c]





    This list is not in any particular order, since we will be deciding the order as we go. The first film, though, will be The Man in the Moon which will be started soon.



    I want to thank Agee, Patrick, Seth and George for agreeing to be part of this. This has taken quite a bit of work from all of them to get done. I also want to thank Parker Clack and Vince Maskeeper. Vince was fundamental in providing the code so this post would look the way I wanted it to. Parker has tolerated my constant questions and pestering with a great deal of grace, and has just been generally helpful.





    Coming up is: The Man in the Moon and hopefully lots of lively discussion. Tell all your friends!
     
  2. Allen Hirsch

    Allen Hirsch Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1999
    Messages:
    532
    Likes Received:
    0
    John-

    what a great idea.

    Thanks for organizing this effort. I look forward to the upcoming reviews and discussions. (You've picked two of my favorite films - Vertigo and Out of Sight.)
     
  3. JohnRice

    JohnRice Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2000
    Messages:
    8,813
    Likes Received:
    207
    Real Name:
    John
    Actually Allen, each individual chose his own film, so Seth and George are responsible for those choices.
    [​IMG]
     
  4. Mike Graham

    Mike Graham Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2001
    Messages:
    766
    Likes Received:
    0
    Vertigo is definitely one of my favorites films of all time.[​IMG]
     
  5. JohnRice

    JohnRice Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2000
    Messages:
    8,813
    Likes Received:
    207
    Real Name:
    John
    Your monitor must be set to a minimum resolution
    of 800x600 to properly view this post.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    The Man in the Moon
    Dir. Robert Mulligan
    D.P. Freddie Francis
    Cast
    Reese Witherspoon: Dani Trant
    Sam Waterston: Matt Trant
    Tess Harper: Abigail Trant
    Emily Warfield: Maureen Trant
    Gail Strickland: Marie Foster
    Jason London: Court Foster

    I had never heard of The Man in the Moon when it came out on DVD a little over a year ago. I started reading recommendations of it here on the HTF, and since it was only $10, decided to give it a try, sight unseen. In the time since then, I have come to find it a most enjoyable film to watch. IÕm not saying it is an example of perfection. The story and dialog can be a bit choppy and strained, particularly with some holes in the development of one of the most critical relationships depicted in the film. Despite that, there are two aspects to it that have motivated me to pop in the DVD about 20 times since. The photography and the performance by Reese Witherspoon.
    The Man in the Moon is directed by Robert Mulligan, who is most well known for Summer of Ô42 and To Kill a Mockingbird. I respect him particularly for being somewhat of a pioneer by bucking the entire Hollywood mindset of the time and insisting on photographing the latter film in B&W. These days, that may not seem like such an issue, but in 1962, it was widely considered unacceptable to do so and was thought to guarantee a film would not be successful. Mulligan brings the same clean, understated style to The Man in the Moon that was evident in his more well known efforts.
    Freddie Francis is probably most well known for his B&W work on the David Lynch film The Elephant Man, but he is also responsible for many other memorable works, such as, The French LieutenantÕs Woman, Glory, Cape Fear (1991) and most recently The Straight Story. He has a talent for creating lush environments, whether they are in B&W or color. This skill is possibly at itÕs peak in The Man in the Moon.
    Its not an easy prospect to decide how to discuss the photography of a film. Now IÕm realizing why no one else wanted to go first in this thread. [​IMG] I have tried to come up with several different aspects of the photography that I find interesting, so I will be discussing each one of those aspects, rather than moving chronologically through the film.
    [c]All images are linked to larger versions. To see the larger one,
    just click on the image in the thread.
    [/c]
    I also want to say a couple things about the DVD. Even though MGM had been, and to some point still is slammed around here for their DVDs, this one proved to me that they were finally Ògetting it.Ó It has one of the best anamorphic transfers I have seen as well as a nicely handled soundtrack, which is two channel, but this film has no need for 5.1 surround. The music soundtrack, by James Newton Howard, with a great deal of solo acoustic guitar, is also a welcome change from the much more common, regurgitated John Williams style overly dramatic orchestral tripe. There are really no supplements other than trailers, but what makes it for me is the price. I honestly wish more studios put out DVDs of this quality, supplements or not, that can be purchased for around $10.
    Now, on to the cinematography.
    Fantasy
    A powerful visual style in The Man in the Moon could easily be called ÒFantasy.Ó What the purpose of this look is could be debatable. I am inclined to think it is meant to reflect the freshness of youth. The youth of the main character, Dani. This look is instant and pervasive throughout the film and is probably due to several techniques used by Francis. The most obvious is a strong use of fill light. In fact, I feel that his use of fill is occasionally taken a bit too far. Most of the time, though, it contributes to the warm, dreamy quality of the film, which is particularly apparent in the first two examples below. Another technique is probably using various types of filtration, to either warm and/or soften the image. I have wondered a few times if he even used the same ÒSilk StockingÓ filter concept used by Oswald Morris in The Fiddler on the Roof. I also expect the high humidity and low altitude of Southern Louisiana in the summer had a significant part in the luminous look of this film.
    [c]Notable examples of the ÒFantasyÓ feel are this shot of
    Dani running through the fields to go swimming.
    [​IMG]
    Abigail talking with Marie at a family picnic
    [​IMG]
    Court working on the farm
    [​IMG]
    As well as this shot establishing the relationship between Dani and Maureen.
    [​IMG]
    There are also examples where I think Francis takes this style too far
    with excessive use of fill light, such as this scene of Maureen leaving
    to go to a dance. There is so much fill in this shot that it almost
    looks like it is actually on an indoor set.
    [​IMG][/c]
    Layering
    Throughout The Man in the Moon, Francis is constantly showing action ÒthroughÓ various obstacles as well as having several layers of action. For me, this helps keep the film visually appealing as well as occasionally giving the viewer a sense of distance from the chracters. We arenÕt always in the middle of the action. In fact, it is during some of the most emotional scenes that the viewer is put at the greatest distance.
    [c]In this scene we see Dani watching her father prepare to go fishing while the rest of her family is getting ready for church. The short discussion between Dani and her mother on aspects of religion, her obvious admiration of her father on this subject, as well as her domination in this shot are all early indications of the unusual wisdom and strength of her character.
    [​IMG]
    This shot uses layering to help exhibit the power of the father over his children.
    Dani is almost dwarfed by his presence.
    [​IMG]
    This is a particularly strong example, after DaniÕs father has punished her for sneaking out to go swimming at night, which caused an accident that put her mother in the hospital. It really takes viewing the entire scene to get the feel. After her father walks away, Dani ÒemergesÓ from behind the handrail and then disappears again. The full scene starts at the 44:10 point on the DVD.
    [​IMG]
    In the next scene, this same technique is used to possibly
    demonstrate DaniÕs ÒincarcerationÓ as a result of her behavior.
    [​IMG]
    Finally, I find this to be a particularly powerful example of using distance during an
    intimate, emotional scene, as Abbie consoles Maureen over CourtÕs death.
    [​IMG][/c]
    Choreography
    This is the most difficult topic to discuss using only stills, since it is almost impossible to show choreography that way. Still, it is one of my favorite aspects of the photography in this film. Freddie Francis and Robert Mulligan both have a tendency to choreograph their scenes elegantly and with as few cuts as possible. There are multiple scenes with Dani running across the partially obscurred field of vision with the camera panning from a stationary position to follow. There are also several scenes viewed from one room as the action moves throughout and outside the house.
    [c]Such a scene is this one in which the camera views all the action from the living room.
    The car drives up outside, Dani and Maureen get out, Maureen tries to stop Dani, who
    continues to run into and through the house.
    [​IMG] [​IMG][/c]
    Another example can be seen at the beginning of Chapter 15. This follows a short conversation between Dani and Abbie, Dani walking outside and around the side of the house, getting in the truck, riding away with her father and back to Abbie, all in one shot. Many directors and D.P.s would have handled this with several cuts, but here, all the action and camera movement is perfectly choreographed so the viewer sees it in one shot.
    The final example occurs shortly after that while Dani and Matt are fishing, and begins at 1:29:50. The scene fades to a wide panning shot of the Louisiana Bayou which settles on a distant view of Dani and Matt fishing. This is followed by a cut to Matt casting his line and figuratively ÒpullingÓ the camera up to view the boat.
    [c]
    [​IMG]
    This is followed by alternating, close-up shots of Matt and Dani,
    until it finally settles to a view of both of them.
    [​IMG][/c]
    Isolation
    I feel a particular strength of this film is its ability to visually demonstrate the isolation of the characters at various points in the story. This first example is from two shots which occur simultaneously as Matt is returning home from taking Abbie to the hospital. We see Dani waiting as Matt walks in from the rain.
    [c][​IMG] [​IMG]
    As well as this shot, a short time later, of Matt sitting alone after punishing Dani.
    Notice all the shadow lines converging on him.
    [​IMG]
    Matt and Dani in the same shot, but separated by lighting. Once again,
    Matt is dwarfing Dani except this time it is achieved by bathing Matt in light
    and keeping Dani as mostly a shadowy outline.
    [​IMG]
    Maureen, isolated by both composition and lighting after CourtÕs death.
    [​IMG]
    Dani, on the outside looking in, during CourtÕs funeral.
    [​IMG]
    Maureen, once again isolated by both composition and lighting at CourtÕs grave.
    Interestingly, this shot is surrounded by death, but is also the most lush one of the entire film.
    [​IMG][/c]
    Bold Framing & Lighting
    As a photographer, I particularly appreciate composition and lighting that are bold and unconventional. Motion pictures offer so many opportunities to push the limits that arenÕt necessarily available in still photography. The Man in the Moon has many scenes using bold composition and fairly unconventional lighting to express the emotions of the characters.
    [c]A youthful shot of Dani watching Court jump into the pond.
    [​IMG]
    The ÒalmostÓ encounter between Dani and Court,
    utilizing a fairly strong highlight style and mixed color temperatures.
    [​IMG]
    Friction after the encounter.
    [​IMG]
    Matt returning from the hospital. A sort of all consuming anger.
    [​IMG]
    Matt after punishing Dani. The coolness of Maureen and anger of Matt.
    [​IMG][/c]
    Sisterhood
    Is it corny? I suppose so, but the bond between Dani and Maureen is a major theme in this film. This bond, of course, goes through its trials during the course of the story. I included this theme mainly because I enjoy some of the photography associated with it.
    [c][​IMG] [​IMG]
    [​IMG][/c]
    Bookends
    This film has what I think is a pretty unusual aspect to it, so I though I would bring it up. The opening shot and the closing shot are virtually identical. I suspect this was done to give the film, at least subconsciously, a sense of finality, that the story had reached its conclusion. This used to be a common practice with music, at least classical music, where a movement would return to its opening key just as it reached it conclusion.
    [c][​IMG] [​IMG][/c]
    And finally, a few words about
    Reese Witherspoon
    Each time I watch this film, I am a little more impressed with the performance of this actor. There has been excitement about the performances of child actors before. Anna Paquin won an Oscar for The Piano, Haley Joel Osment received a great deal of attention for his role in The Sixth Sense and, a particular favorite of mine, Kirsten Dunst was simply chilling in Interview with a Vampire. The common factor to all those roles seems to be amazement at such a good performance from a child. Reese WitherspoonÕs performance in The Man in the Moon is just plain astounding, child or not.
    Her ability to be a 14 year old girl, swinging her arms and stumbling as she walks at one moment and almost chillingly wise and insightful at another moment is only part of the equation. Her knack for subtlety and non-verbal acting should be the envy of most, much better known actors. There are almost too many examples to list where she, almost imperceptibly, changes her expression to convey or emphasize an emotion. One comes in the first scene of the film, while she is talking to Maureen. A statement she makes is emphasized by a slight change in expression as she cracks open a walnut. Another occurs just before and during the fade out from a close-up of her after CourtÕs funeral, shown in the top two images below. There is a slight flinch of her eyelids after which she shakes her head slightly as the scene fades out. These nuances strike me as so natural and human it is hard for me to think she is acting. The fact is, she performs her role so well, it is occasionally unsettling. A 14 year old girl is not supposed to possess this depth.
    Finally, the bottom line is this girl absolutely chews up the screen. A sentiment apparantly shared by Robert Mulligan and Freddie Francis because the film is filled with close-ups of her.
    [c]
    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    [​IMG] [​IMG][/c]
    I know in the years since this first role, Witherspoon has become known for saving what would probably be otherwise mediocre movies, though she has had a couple more notable roles. I hope before long she takes a lesson from Jennifer Connelly and starts choosing films of greater substance. I expect she is up to the challenge.
    EDIT: In the year since I did this discussion, I have become even more appreciative of the performance by Reese Witherspoon. When I first saw The Man in the Moon I had heard nothing about it, even though it was released 10 years earlier. Since then, I have realized what an unusual performance it is and what a truly outstanding actor Witherspoon is. I agree with Robert Harris' recent comment that this is the type of performance that only comes along every decade or so. If she were Paul Newman, this would be her Cool Hand Luke. I have also come to realize some of the other excellent performances Witherspoon has made. From the dark comedy Election to the even darker Freeway and the down home style of Wildflower, Witherspoon has proven to me to be among the top tier of actors of her generation, if not at the top.
    A follow up post to this analysis can be seen Here.
    ThatÕs it, folks. Let the discussion begin.
     
  6. Josh_Hill

    Josh_Hill Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2002
    Messages:
    1,049
    Likes Received:
    0
    Uhh.....its a good looking film. [​IMG]
     
  7. Rain

    Rain Producer

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2001
    Messages:
    5,015
    Likes Received:
    0
    That was excellent, John.

    I'm only sorry that I haven't seen this film yet, so I'm not really able to contribute significantly to the discussion.

    I found the comparision between the opening and closing shots interesting. The only difference seems to be deliberate (I'm assuming) in that the blinds on the windows are up in the opening shot and down in the closing shot.

    This rather brings to mind what Winton C. Hoch and John Ford did on The Searchers with John Wayne being photographed from the inside of the house through the doorway. Except on this film it's from the outside in.

    I'll have to make a point now of seeing this movie.

    Thanks.
     
  8. george kaplan

    george kaplan Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2001
    Messages:
    13,063
    Likes Received:
    2
    John,
    Very nice.
    Could you explain more fully (or more simply) the term "fill light".
    Also, what definition of cinematography are you using. To me there are two:
    1. What the film looks like
    2. Those aspects of the look of a film under the control of the cinematographer (e.g. lighting).
    The reason I ask is because what you're calling layering seems to me to be essentially composition in the frame, which I think of more as the director's vision than the work of the cinematographer.
    Also, don't be surprised if not much happens here before Monday. The forum is much less traveled over the weekend. Late Friday afternoon isn't the best time to post something and expect a lot of replies. [​IMG]
     
  9. JohnRice

    JohnRice Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2000
    Messages:
    8,813
    Likes Received:
    207
    Real Name:
    John
    George,

    I knew that there wouldn't necessarily be too much activity on a Friday afternoon and over the weekend. I just figured there was really no loss to just getting it started. I also realize this thread is not so easy to respond to. I have also been paying attention to the view count. I can see a lot of people coming by here, seeing how much time is needed and planning to dedicate some time to it later.

    I'll explain "fill light" in the most general terms and the way it most often applies in this film, since there can really be many variations. Much of the film is shot outdoors, under daylight on a clear day. This causes the picture to have a great deal of contrast, usually meaning the shadows fall very deep, or dark. Fill lights and reflectors are used to "fill in" where the sun doesn't hit and keep the shadows lighter. This is basically the opposite of "noir." This film has virtually no blacks, where "noir" often has little that isn't black or very dark. This "lack of darkness" is a major factor in this film having its "Fantasy" look and also helps increase the color saturation, which further enhances the look. For a comparison, think of the film Legend from Ridley Scott. Throughout most of that film, there are very few deep shadows, images generally have a "soft" appearance and the light is often very warm, or amber in color. This is very similar to The Man in the Moon. While Legend is literally a fantasy both in look and storyline, The Man in the Moon just has the Fantasy look, probably to reflect the personality of the main character.

    As far as what I am meaning by Cinematography, you are absolutely right. There is a great deal of variation there. I am really meaning it to be all aspects of the final image. Though this will extend to the editing, most of it is determined by the Director and Director of Photography. I expect the balance of control each one has varies a great deal from film to film. As Seth points out in his comments on Out of Sight, Steven Soderbergh commands control over a great deal of the final image, so his films have a consistent look, even with different DPs. In the case of The Man in the Moon and a DP of the caliber of Freddie Francis, I expect he had a much greater say in how the shots were done. To think otherwise makes even the greatest DPs nothing more than a "camera mechanic," or someone who is told, "this is what I want, now you create it and don't give me any feedback or suggestions." Your point is also why I decided to list both the director and DP for each film. We can't always know how much control each individual had over the final look of the film, but it is always a partnership.

    I don't have any personal experience with how this partnership typically works. I do know, however that the Director does not always exercise the level of command over shots that often seems to be suggested on this forum. What little personal knowledge I have comes from discussions with DP Frederick Elmes, who graduated from the same photography school as me and who came back to discuss Blue Velvet, when it was released my senior year. Maybe his experience was unusual, since he and David Lynch had such a long relationship of doing films together that started very early with Eraserhead, but I don't think it is that unusual. Ironically, Freddie Francis has shot most of Lynch's films that weren't shot by Elmes.
     
  10. Seth Paxton

    Seth Paxton Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 1998
    Messages:
    7,585
    Likes Received:
    0
    I know for Out of Sight I will be discussing the photography AND some of the mise-en-scene, etc. And I will be pointing out storytelling aspects of this photography even though that normally lies in the director's hands more.
    Kind of a pseudo-cinematography discussion with some direction thrown into it, but hopefully still an interesting look at it. I assume this is a bit where John at the others will be coming from too.
    BTW, speaking of identical shots as bookends there is a fine precedent set for it...Citizen Kane's front gate. [​IMG]
     
  11. JohnRice

    JohnRice Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2000
    Messages:
    8,813
    Likes Received:
    207
    Real Name:
    John
     
  12. JohnRice

    JohnRice Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2000
    Messages:
    8,813
    Likes Received:
    207
    Real Name:
    John
    Don't be bashful, folks.

    If all you want to say is, "I like that shot," or "I don't like that shot," and a little bit about why. Go ahead.

    If you want to say, "John, you're full of yourself." That's good too.
     
  13. Walter Kittel

    Walter Kittel Producer

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 1998
    Messages:
    5,695
    Likes Received:
    555
    John,
    Sorry, nothing terribly substantive to say at this point, other than a few compliments. Great idea for a thread, and a nice examination of The Man In The Moon. I agree with your assessment of the film's evocative visual design. Really a lovely little film that is well worth viewing for those who haven't had the pleasure.
    - Walter.
     
  14. Josh Dial

    Josh Dial Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2000
    Messages:
    2,802
    Likes Received:
    110
    Real Name:
    Josh Dial
    This is an incredible idea for a thread.

    I have not personally seen this film, but I will buy it on monday and give it a spin.

    One thing I noticed in the screen shots is that the characters are either looking decidedly upwards, or decidedly downwards, never really gazing ahead. Not sure if this is symbolic or anything.

    cheers!

    Josh
     
  15. JohnRice

    JohnRice Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2000
    Messages:
    8,813
    Likes Received:
    207
    Real Name:
    John
    That's an interesting point, Josh.
    As I mentally review the film, I think that probably has more to do with what shots I decided to use rather than what is common in the film
    As a little aside, I loaded a couple short clips of the soundtrack for another thread, so I thought I might as well link them here too.
    Clip #1
    Clip #2
    This is mostly the music while Dani is running through the house and off to the pond. The shots of this are the very first shot in the analysis as well as the first two in the "Choreography" section.
     
  16. Allen Hirsch

    Allen Hirsch Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1999
    Messages:
    532
    Likes Received:
    0
    Nice job, John. I enjoyed the screen shots you chose.

    I haven't seen the film, so I don't feel qualified to otherwise comment on it or your review, except to say your review will prompt me to rent it very soon.
     
  17. Voon Jiet

    Voon Jiet Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2001
    Messages:
    176
    Likes Received:
    1
    Real Name:
    Voon
    John, it was a great read!
    I have an interest in all things film-related, but alas, I know very very little about cinematography. As such, it was very enlightening reading your post about The Man in the Moon - which I have yet to see by the way.
    I do have a rookie question about the 'Fantasy' style employed in The Man in the Moon. Would the soft, almost cloudy, images in Superman: The Movie shot by Geoffrey Unsworth be an example of that? Sorry for digressing away from the movie in question though. I don't intend for any discussion on Superman: The Movie, but rather wanted to know if that would be an example of the 'Fantasy' style you described.
    Anyway, its a great thread we have here. Can't wait for the analysis on Vertigo [​IMG]
     
  18. JohnRice

    JohnRice Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2000
    Messages:
    8,813
    Likes Received:
    207
    Real Name:
    John
    Allen and Voon,
    You don't necessarily need to have seen the film to comment. There can always be something to say based just on what is in the post.
    Voon,
    Unfortunately, I've never really paid much attention to Superman, so I can't say. There certainly is a "Fantasy" factor to the story, though. I grabbed a couple shots from some films that get a lot of attention around here. One is already released, one isn't. These two films both have fantasy storylines as well as look.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  19. Scott H

    Scott H Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2000
    Messages:
    693
    Likes Received:
    0
     
  20. JohnRice

    JohnRice Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2000
    Messages:
    8,813
    Likes Received:
    207
    Real Name:
    John
    Scott,
    Your comments agree with what I have always felt. It often seemed to me that the role of the DP was usually diminished in the opinion of many folks here. There have been certain tyrants where that is concerned, and Kubrick is probably a good example, but it tends to irritate me how I read so often how little influence the DP has on the final image. It goes along with the general belief that an intrinsically beautiful subject automatically results in beautiful images. How many people have taken a picture of a beautiful scene only to have the photo turn out like the dog's lunch? It isn't just because "you had to be there." It is because you need to know what you are doing.
    That aside, I wonder if anyone has any comments on the life/death paradox of this image from late in The Man in the Moon? Certainly someone does. click on it to see the larger image.
    [c][​IMG][/c]
     

Share This Page