tankless water heaters

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by DarrinH, Oct 23, 2001.

  1. DarrinH

    DarrinH Second Unit

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    The forum members experiences?
    I am looking into getting one of these. We have an all electric house and we live in WV with usually mild/moderate winters. What are the drawbacks of having one? Will the lights in the house dim when one kicks on? The rumor is that you can cut the cost of heating your water by one third. How much would you figure this would save on the power bill. Our electric rates here are pretty good.
    Let me have it with the info I need help.
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  2. Bill Catherall

    Bill Catherall Screenwriter

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    Don't tankless water heaters usually use gas to heat the water? Why all the electric questions? (Edit - Oh. Because you have an all electric house. Can you get an electric tankless water heater?)
    I've lived in apartments before that have tankless water heaters (all gas powered). I loved them. You can never run out of hot water. Also, you don't waste money keeping the water hot all day long when you aren't even using it. If I had the money or if I was replacing my water heater I'd install a tankless unit.
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    [Edited last by Bill Catherall on October 23, 2001 at 03:43 PM]
     
  3. brianacook

    brianacook Stunt Coordinator

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    this is what we have. the only drawback i have noticed is a small one - it takes about a minute to get hot water until the oil burner kicks in. but, after that, you never run out.
    brian
     
  4. Todd Hochard

    Todd Hochard Cinematographer

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    I've done a bit of research into these, and the electric variants require a LOT of power. For instance, your typical electric tank water heater is usually hooked up with a 220V, 30 breaker (double pole). A tankless will require more than twice that- 70 to 80 amp service. You would tend to need a larger model than I, as the ground water in your location is about 20F colder than mine.
    Make sure the service up to your house is up to snuff, or you could have some serious power droop- not to mention the risk of overheating/fire in the service lines to the house.
    A good second choice to solar, IMO- at least you're not paying for what you don't use.
    Todd
     

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