Show us your camera's best pix! Part II

Discussion in 'Photography' started by Mark Shannon, Sep 25, 2004.

  1. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
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  2. ManW_TheUncool

    ManW_TheUncool Producer

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    These are not "my camera's best pix", but they are what they are. [​IMG]

    Minnie Driver was in town to promote here new debut album at J&R -- never knew she could sing.
    http://www.pbase.com/mandnwong/minnie_driver_at_jr_2004

    An image of a colleague at a recent software engineering talk.
    http://www.pbase.com/mandnwong/image/34637158

    Did I show this one before from the San Diego Airport? I forget.
    http://www.pbase.com/mandnwong/image/33980725

    A few from the subway starting from here (the "preacher" and then the "comic"):
    http://www.pbase.com/mandnwong/image/34667091

    And a small set of "friends" here:
    http://www.pbase.com/mandnwong/friends

    And no, they are not *my* friends in case you're wondering. [​IMG]

    Kind regards,

    _Man_

    PS: I'm not too sure about using this as an image only thread. I can understand not wanting too much O/T side chat, but to me, photography has much to do w/ communication, and to limit it just to one side might not make too much sense. Certainly, many people from both sides (both maker and viewer) do not want a dialog, but that would also discourage certain kinds of photography that naturally thrive on dialog as well as people who wish for critique and/or affirmation.
     
  3. Aaron Silverman

    Aaron Silverman Executive Producer

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    Nice pix, Man-Fai! (The Asian girl in the "Friends" section kinda reminds me of Wallace from Wallace & Gromit. . .)
     
  4. Holadem

    Holadem Lead Actor

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    Man-Fai, I know quite little about photography but I know one thing, I LOVE your pictures, the way you capture people [​IMG]. I am in the city every other weekend or so, perhaps you could teach me some tricks some day.

    --
    H
     
  5. Jon_Gu

    Jon_Gu Stunt Coordinator

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    Here are a few Photos for you

    Here's what happens when you drive an F-150 into the side of a train traveling 50mph.
    Collision

    Locomotive on fire
    Fire

    Roadsigns mean what they say...or How to get your tanker truck stuck on the RR track
    Stuck
     
  6. ManW_TheUncool

    ManW_TheUncool Producer

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    Thanks, Aaron and Holadem.

    LOL! Now that you mention it, I guess she does look a little bit like Wallace, but not really *that* much.

    As for teaching/tips/tricks, I'm always glad to help, but I doubt meeting together helps any in that regard. I think beyond just learning the basics and such as well as spending lots of time looking at other people's images and maybe reading some anecdotes, the rest is really just up to you to discover as you practice and find your way into an approach and/or style that works for you. In that sense, it's definitely a combination of both science (ie. technical skills) and art.

    Also, I find that the cinema definitely has a strong influence on my "eye" for photography. And as I learn and grow, I find myself paying much more attention to the cinematography in films and even the occasional TV show I watch. It's definitely the cinema that leads me to go for more of what people coin as "environmental portraits" vs more classic portrait photography. It's also why I find appeal in using letterboxing on some of my wide scope images.

    Finally, here's a good site to check out for tips on street photography, which is what I love to do -- and is essentially what you see in most of my images. I came across this site over in DPReview's Samples & Galleries forum a few months ago while discussing how to approach street photography -- see we don't always talk gear over there. [​IMG] Anyway, it didn't really say very much that I didn't already begin to discover for myself, but it certainly helped solidify things for me and also inspire a more ambitious outlook for myself -- not that I have gotten very far just yet.

    http://www.pinkheadedbug.com/

    Here are a few more good, relevant essays although they are not all specific to street/people photography.

    http://luminous-landscape.com/essays/theartof.shtml

    http://luminous-landscape.com/essays/telling.shtml

    http://luminous-landscape.com/essays...riations.shtml

    Essentially, you have to be passionate about your photography and also find and develop your "eye", if you want to get very far. It's really not that different than any other pursuit. For me, I find that it can be a lot like programming and software design as strange as that may sound. [​IMG] And oh, there are many other great essays and tutorials at the LL site too.

    But do remember (as those writers will point out) that you need to master the basics before you can get very far w/ your passion. Digital does make learning/practicing much easier and faster, but it still needs to be learned (and mastered). Heck, I'm definitely still in the process of learning to master the basics (and my particular camera) as I go. Also, having the right tool for the "job" is important as well, and that could also be a personal preference thing too as things like ergonomics and handling do come into play despite what some naysayers may say. Sure, Ansel Adams can outshoot me any day w/ a pinhole camera, but that doesn't mean he wouldn't do better w/ something much more appropriate to whatever kinds of images he wants to make -- and maybe there are some images that are perfect for the pinhole camera too despite all that technological advances can offer.

    _Man_
     
  7. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
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    Here's me shooting folks sitting around me at yesterday's Braves-Astros playoff game with my Canon S1 IS. I was mucking around with the DoF for the faces when possible.
     
  8. ManW_TheUncool

    ManW_TheUncool Producer

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    Pat,

    Those are definitely much better than the previous set you posted, IIRC. For the most part, the ones where you narrowed the DoF to blur out the background in addition to capturing particular emotions and/or moments that we can connect w/ are the best ones. And often, the different angles (rather than typical eye-level approach) enhance the feel of the images.

    This is a good example of what I mean:

    http://www.patcave.com/braves1/img_6954.jpg

    And here, the blurred background does also add interest to the shot w/out being a distraction.

    _Man_
     
  9. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
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    Thanks for the comments. It's sort of chaotic jumping back and forth between snapping photos of a sporting event and faces in the crowd. You almost have to commit to one or the other while setting up the shot.
     
  10. Romar Armas

    Romar Armas Second Unit

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  11. JohnRice

    JohnRice Lead Actor

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    I know it was requested for there to be no discussion, but the entire reason for the forum is discussion....


    Andrew, I suggest you make a conscious effort to not center your subjects so much. Several of those shots are almost there, but just need the composition changed a bit.
     
  12. Mark Shannon

    Mark Shannon Screenwriter

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    Heh I realized that John. I think I'll edit my first post so as to remove that comment. I realize that you can't successfully post your pictures without at the very least expecting a critique of them.
     
  13. Richard Travale

    Richard Travale Producer

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    This is in no way a "good" photograph. It was a fluke shot taken out of my window as I drove by the local cemetary. I am using my Canon S200 and just hung it out the window and snapped.
    I just think it looks cool.

    http://members.shaw.ca/rtravale/IMG_0326.JPG
     
  14. ManW_TheUncool

    ManW_TheUncool Producer

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    I agree w/ John. As a general guideline, centering your subject rarely works best. For those who'd like to know more on that and perhaps the why's, do a search for "rule of thirds" or "golden rectangle" or "golden mean", etc. Here's a freebie (that I found fascinating) to start you off -- and it also attempts to explain how we got the 3:2 ratio for 35mm format: [​IMG]

    http://fotogenetic.dearingfilm.com/g...rectangle.html

    Of course, it's just a guideline and does not always work best, but if you want a rule to follow, then that's a good one -- I certainly don't follow it all the time nor very exactly when I do. And also, you can often do a little cropping to improve the photo although it's generally best to make the most of the composition during the shoot even if you shoot w/ the intention to crop -- eg. for different ratio.

    And oh, if you are a Nikon DSLR user, then that site has some extra info that you might like to check out.

    And Richard, I like the idea of that shot, but I think it could use more contrast in the sky -- actually, it needs some interesting clouds to really work. But not sure why you should qualify its quality so much as you did since you felt it "looks cool" and wanted to share it anyway -- and did not appear to be asking for a critique. [​IMG]

    And well, since we're supposed to post photos, guess I'll offer up some recent additions to my pbase galleries:

    Handful from an August b'day party that I finally uploaded...
    http://www.pbase.com/mandnwong/birthday_parties

    "The Accordianist"
    http://www.pbase.com/mandnwong/the_accordianist

    In between some early Autumn showers...
    http://www.pbase.com/mandnwong/autumn_showers

    "Neighborhood Foot Traffic"
    http://www.pbase.com/mandnwong/image/35290160

    "Youngsters Night Out"
    http://www.pbase.com/mandnwong/image/35290158

    http://www.pbase.com/mandnwong/image/35290159

    "Night Stand"
    http://www.pbase.com/mandnwong/image/35292233

    _Man_
     
  15. Mark Shannon

    Mark Shannon Screenwriter

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  16. ManW_TheUncool

    ManW_TheUncool Producer

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    Hi, Mark.

    Thanks for the kind words. Yes, I was indeed looking for reflections to shoot -- and shot a few others that I did not upload -- and when she sat where she did, I went for a couple shots, including this one. I'd say street photography is mainly a combo of good opportunity (whether looked for or purely by chance) and making the most of it when it happens.

    BTW, in my recent street shooting around Madison Square Garden, I "bumped" into a different kind of photo opp. The owner of a small startup(?) fashion company asked me to try freelancing at his fashion show last night. I said, "ok, why not?" [​IMG] Well, it was a low rent kinda thing at a local bar & grill, and the whole thing was very difficult to shoot for many reasons, especially given my utter inexperience w/ this kind of photography -- well, I've read/seen my fair share of forum chat and sample photos on the subject in the past, but that's about it.

    Anyway, I guess if the photos turn out good enough (or at least show enough potential) for the owner, I guess I will give this thing some more tries. [​IMG] In the meantime, I might be getting some calls to do portrait work for portfolios of some aspiring young modeling newbies -- there were several show attendees who asked. We shall see.

    And in the meantime, I will finally have to break down and get an external flash for my D70 along w/ some minimal equipment for shooting studio-style portraits. Certainly could've really used the external flash last night for all the longer, full height shots.

    _Man_
     
  17. JohnRice

    JohnRice Lead Actor

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    Man,

    I have to chuckle a bit. You are delving into a whole other realm of photography. I expect you haven't dealt with seriously challenging technical situations. I'll give you a bit of advice, or more of an analogy, on shooting stuff for pay. Shooting stuff for yourself is... "Hey, this is a neat shot, I think I'll take it." Where doing it professionally is... "I want you to take this pile of shit in the middle of a dirt field and make it look like a bed of roses in the middle of a pasture of daisies... and I might even pay you $20 if I really like the shots."

    Just be prepared. [​IMG]


    [​IMG] Yeah, minimal equipment. [​IMG]
     
  18. ManW_TheUncool

    ManW_TheUncool Producer

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    LOL! You don't say, John. [​IMG] I don't think I can ever be prepared until I've done it for a long while -- and then, I'll be doing it at least semi-professionally at that point. [​IMG]

    Somehow, I think this stuff is kinda like trying to become a doctor (in its own way). The road there is extremely difficult in terms of the learning process, paying one's dues and dealing w/ difficult situations, and the actual photography side of things gets much easier (in a way) after you've made it since you'd probably work under technically better conditions, but of course, the stakes (and pressures) will also be that much higher when you finally become established.

    The question for me right now is whether I can really walk the fine line between hobby and profession and only do this kind of thing successfully as a parttime freelancer. I don't really need the income per se although I'd love it to help fund the expensive hobby. OTOH, I'd hate to do it and not get any good at it because I can't devote quite enough time and effort into it.

    Probably, fashion photography is not for me anyway given my interests in photography. And if I was all that interested, I probably could find better ways to approach it than what I just did last night. [​IMG] Last night was more a try-it-and-see kinda thing although I did enjoy meeting some nice folks and also do a little "street" shooting at the event -- I even met a curator/producer for the city's JVC Jazz Festival despite the low rent production. But for serious fashion photography, I might be better off trying to get connected through my mother, who actually works in the fashion industry as a patternmaker. Of course, I probably do need to do some more shooting at these low rent shows to hone my skills at dealing w/ difficult situations first.

    But yeah, I definitely agree w/ the whole thing about shooting for pay and catering one's photography to the exact demands of the clientele, whether it's "pile of shit" or "bed of roses". [​IMG] So very much of the professional field seems to revolve around sales/marketing afterall, instead of personal vision. Of course, if your personal vision happens to coincide w/ or even pioneers what is fashionable *and* you have the talent and skills to pull it off regularly, then you really hit it big like the late Richard Averdan.

    _Man_
     

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