RG-6 vs. RG-59

Discussion in 'Beginners, General Questions' started by George Martin, Apr 12, 2003.

  1. George Martin

    George Martin Stunt Coordinator

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    Hi
    Just a quick question what is the differance between RG-6 and RG-59 and which would be better for a 25foot componant video run.
    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Glenn Overholt

    Glenn Overholt Producer

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    RG-6 is the better, by far. If it is available, go all out and get quad-shield too. It isn't that much more and the extra shielding might help out in a pinch.

    Glenn
     
  3. George Martin

    George Martin Stunt Coordinator

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    thank you Glenn, when I posted the question I was at work and I thought I had a roll of RG 59 at home and a friend told me it was junk that I should be using RG 6 when I got home and looked it was RG 6 so I'm good to go.
     
  4. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Ok, RG59 is not really 'junk'.

    It has a bit less attenuation (signal reduction) over 100 feet, and the shielding does not work as well to keep Gigahertz level signals inside the center conductor. RG6 is designed better for this which is why it has become the standard for Sat systems and broadband CATV systems. (Mixing standard CATV, Digital, Cable Modem on 1 coax).

    So you are going to make your own component video cable from this? What kind of signals are you sending: Component, Progressive or 1080 HD?

    I'm a little concerned that it wont work well. It WILL work, but not like you might want.

    My advice: build the cable first and test it before you go to the trouble of embedding it in walls. You might try this to test:

    Get a copy of Avia (DVD setup disk) and using a real set of component video cables, examine the Fine Focus test pattern (The one with very fine black lines on a white background). Yes, move your DVD player near the display to get shorter cables to fit.

    Then plug in your home-built cable and see if the appearance of the test pattern changes. Make sure your long cable does not coil up into a tight loop. Make it spread out in one big loop with gentle "S" bends.

    Do any of the fine lines become blurry/loose focus with the long cable? If not, you are good to go.

    My Concern: RG6 is more of a "Form Factor" rather than a statement of what signals it is designed to carry. Coax cables are designed with some frequencies and applications in mind. Your spool of RG6 CATV coax was likely designed to:

    - Survive outdoor installations for 10-15 years
    - Handle analog signals up to about 1 Mhz
    - Handle digital signals up to 1-2 GigHz

    Where is the part about analog video frequencies from 4-35 Mhz? To use a asphalt analogy, you may be trying to race stock-cars on suburban streets built with 25 mph speeds in mind. Sure, a race track, freeway, suburban streets are all roads and they all use the same asphalt: but they were each built with different speeds in mind.

    So on the weekend, build and test the cable before doing the perminent install just to make sure it works.

    And then let us know how it worked. Inquiring minds want to know.[​IMG]
     
  5. Ryan Patterson

    Ryan Patterson Stunt Coordinator

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  6. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Uhhh...

    Between the Grounding Block and Receiver...???

    You use RG6 between the Dish and the receiver. You can use any-old wire for a ground wire.

    Look: the signals from your sat system are DIGITAL. This means they are less-sensitive to the cable than traditional analog. If you are using RG59 for a 50 foot run of satalite signals there IS more loss than if you had used RG6. But the digital nature of the signals makes it look like perfect transmission.

    The Satalite signals are in the GigaHz range of frequency. RG59 was designed to handle into the MegaHz range so it does not do as well when you up the frequency into the GigaHz range. RG6 was designed to handle the higher frequencys.

     
  7. Ryan Patterson

    Ryan Patterson Stunt Coordinator

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  8. JeremyFr

    JeremyFr Supporting Actor

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    Posted in the wrong thread.
     
  9. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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  10. Ryan Patterson

    Ryan Patterson Stunt Coordinator

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    Hi Bob,

    Considering I only vaguely know how dB works in the signal arena (the only dB I've really seen is when you turn up/down the volume on a reciever and you see the dB value on that change), I'm not sure exactly what the graph is supposed to tell me. The bird's-eye view of it seems to tell me that there isn't much difference between all 3 of those cable types. They all fall off at relatively the same rate, and when they reach 1Ghz they've all taken (what looks like) a significant drop.
     
  11. JamesHl

    JamesHl Supporting Actor

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    I had trouble getting some digital channels and I had some ugly pixelization when I used a RG 59 interconnect to hookup my digital cable. Also, my cable modem randomly dropped out. I had a terrible signal coming into the apartment, however.
     
  12. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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