Replacing brake pads?

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by CRyan, Apr 1, 2003.

  1. CRyan

    CRyan Screenwriter

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    Hello, I was wondering if anyone has a website or other online guide to replacing pads on a 2002 Honda Accord.

    Just got back from the Honda dealership hoping that the pads would be under warranty considering the car only has 14,500 miles on it. Nope! Pads are only warranted to 12,000 miles. UGH!

    Anyway, my Honda Civic went to 55,000 miles before I had to replace those pads. What went wrong with this Accord is beyond me. I do not believe I have changed my driving style enough to justify such a difference in wear between cars.

    So back to the original question. I have heard that replacing pads was rather easy for the so inclined. I just need to know where to start.


    Thanks for any help,

    C. Ryan
     
  2. LDfan

    LDfan Supporting Actor

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    Damn. What model accord is it, LX or EX. My wife has a 99 EX and her factory brakes lasted until about 35-40k. My 99LX lasted til about 50k for the front brakes.

    Are your brakes hitting the sensors? You'll know because of the fairly loud, non-stop squeaking while accelerating.
    Plus all hondas have a 3 year, 36k bumper to bumper warranty so I would think they should be covered if they really needed to be replaced.

    Jeff
     
  3. CRyan

    CRyan Screenwriter

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    Accord EX V6 Coupe


    Every bumper-bumper warranty has its fine print. Most manufacturers warranties will state that certain wearing parts are only warranted for 12,000 miles (i.e. tires, brake pads, wiper blades, etc.).

    I was hoping that considering it only has 14,500 miles, they would half the cost with me. No again...

    Considering they wanted $280 to replace all four, I told them nicely to put the wheels back on.

    The left front certainly needs to be replaced as it started grinding last night. This prompted me to take in early this morning.

    They are not stuck or anything like that as the rotors are heating up evenly and there is no squeaking.

    C. Ryan
     
  4. Zen Butler

    Zen Butler Producer

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    Sedan or Coupe?
     
  5. CRyan

    CRyan Screenwriter

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    oops! edited above to state that it is a coupe.
     
  6. Zen Butler

    Zen Butler Producer

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    Nothing special about this job. You will need to find a parts house that turns rotors for optimum performance and longevity. As far as step by step, I would have to fax that to you. PM me your fax # and I'll send you a step by step process
     
  7. Bry_DD

    Bry_DD Second Unit

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    I suggest to get a service manuals and do the job yourself. It's pretty simple and easy. If you're doing the fronts just take off the wheel, the caliper with probably has 2 bolts. then slide out the pads. then take off the caliper mounting bracket so you can get the rotor out to get it resurface. you can get the rotor resurface at a local Pep boys or Autozone store pretty cheap. I suggest you do them soon if its squeaking pretty bad (metal to Metal) or elase you'll end up spending more than you should have. Then just reverse the process. also you have to bleed the line to get the caliper back on the pads. hope that gives you some idea..
     
  8. jeff lam

    jeff lam Screenwriter

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    Have you tried taking it to a different shop that specializes in Honda/Acura? They usually do just as good a job as the dealer but at a much lower price.

    You can do it yourself and it isn't that hard. The hardest part will be getting the caliper off as they are hammered on with those air powered tools.

    Unless the newer cars are different it shouldn't be much work to do it yourself. Although be aware you are working on a very important part of the car. You screw up on the brakes and you may find yourself in a car that can't stop.

    EDIT:
    You don't have to take off the rotors unless they are really worn. This is the most difficult part. Getting that Axle Nut off is a PITA!!! On top of that, it will cost you about $20 for the large Axle nut Socket and about $30 for a breaker bar (VERY BIG ONE) if you don't have these. And if you don't have these or an air compressor, that axle nut is not comming off.
     
  9. CRyan

    CRyan Screenwriter

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    Ok, well I see that the calliper looks as though it has two metal "clips" that hold something on - not bolts. Maybe I am wrong though - needs closer inspection.

    Pictures would help as I am not sure of what all the names of items are.

    Thanks,

    C. Ryan
     
  10. jeff lam

    jeff lam Screenwriter

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    Calliper is the big thing that clamps the pads to the disc. Once you get the calliper off, the pads just pop out. Those metal clip things don't hold anything on.
     
  11. Zen Butler

    Zen Butler Producer

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    Your fax is sent[​IMG]
     
  12. CRyan

    CRyan Screenwriter

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    Yep, Zen you are the greatest. I appreciate it.

    Now if someone could tell me what to get in regards to pads. I am sure Auto Zone will have different types made of different materials. Anything to shy away from or to deffinately get? Snake oil tends to be the rule rather than the exception with auto parts.

    C. Ryan
     
  13. Zen Butler

    Zen Butler Producer

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    It has been my experience that the lesser house brands just don't cut it in certain applications, including later model Honda. Opt for the Raybestos Quiet Stop, which is a ceramic pad. Very quiet
    a part # PGD503QS ought to run you about $49. An Allied/Bendix pad equivelant would do just fine here also.


    seriously write down this part #, AZ is notorious for giving out wrong parts. Pads do vary from motor size, model etc. DO NOT LET THEM SELL YOU A PART # 465, they will not work on this application.
     
  14. Todd Hochard

    Todd Hochard Cinematographer

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    Are you sure you just don't have something (e.g. dirt) stuck in the pads? I'd be VERY surprised if the pads were actually worn out, with only 14500 on the clock. Are the pads worn thin? Are they down to the "telltale scraper?" If not, I'd just clean them and put them back.

    If they are actually worn out, there is something seriously wrong with either your car, or your driving style.

    I drove my '95 Accord EX 115K on the front pads. 8.5 years of mostly city commuting.
     
  15. Steve Berger

    Steve Berger Supporting Actor

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    Autozone.com does have an online repair guide complete with pictures and they do show brake pad replacement for the older Accord models that might get you started on the procedures. Disk brakes are pretty easy , (no bleeding or adjustments are normally needed). I got over 30,000 miles on replacement pads on my Ford truck even though the rotor was scored. A poor rotor usually just wears out the pad faster.
     
  16. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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    I've done brake pads on my motorcycle (multiple times, multiple bikes) and it's not a difficult task. However, the logistics of getting to them would prompt me to pay a local shop to do them in my car. The motorcyle is much more accessible.
     
  17. Eric Kahn

    Eric Kahn Guest

    If your car has antilock brakes, you do not want to force the brake fluid back through the system when you squeeze the calipers to get the new pads in, you want to bleed it out the bleeder on the caliper as you squeeze the piston back in
     
  18. MarkO

    MarkO Second Unit

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    I would get the Raybestos Quiet Stop pads, or the Factory Pads. Im not too sure about the 2002 model, but many Honda Acords have rotors that are pressed onto the axles. If this is the case with yours you will not be able to remove them.
     
  19. ema02

    ema02 Auditioning

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    Hi there Cryan! I know it is really too late to post this reply but I still insisted on posting it for the benefit of those who could possibly need it in the future. It is a DIY for brake pads replacement. I hope it would be a useful addition to the thread.
     
  20. Jay H

    Jay H Producer

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    Just a few notes, check to see whether the new pads you do buy have those shims that many brake pads use in between it and the cylinder. You can use brake squeel compound in between the pad and the shim and the shim and the cyclinder but don't put them on the rail guides as they seem to gum up and harden, preventing the pads from floating which it should do.

    For my floating Subaru brake pads, to remove the caliper from the hub (to remove the pads), I also use a open ended socket wrench behind the caliper and the usual socket wrench with the right hex bit for the bolt that goes through the caliper. I use the socket wrench to loosen the hex bolt (2 of them) then I use the open ended wrench to hold the nut behind the caliper because that also adjusts the caliper in relationship to the rotor in the floating design. Kind of the same process when putting things back together.

    You can get some brake cleaner and clean the area, just read the special instructions on the cleaner as it's pretty strong stuff.
    Jay
     

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