Piano black...which technique?

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by ShaunO, Jun 20, 2006.

  1. ShaunO

    ShaunO Auditioning

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2006
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    After searching Ive come across 2 ways that have been suggested.

    1) The autobody way. Several layers of black basecoat followed by several layers of clearcoat.

    2) Black lacquer.

    I read that a true piano finish is a hand rubbed lacquer. So...what is the visual difference between the autobody way or the sprayed on black lacquer?
     
  2. BillSuneson

    BillSuneson Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2005
    Messages:
    128
    Likes Received:
    0
    Shaun,

    I'm actually using a black lacquer spray paint from wal-mart that is a very good match for the black piano finish on my LSi9 speaker that will be placed on the shelves that are being built. I'll post pictures in the next day or two to give you an example of how it will look. 2 coats of that and one clear coat and i'm very happy with it. Not exactly an answer to the question of how one differs from the other but at least an opinion from someone that has tried a few methods
     
  3. ShaunO

    ShaunO Auditioning

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2006
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0

    Thanks for the advice. The only concern I have with a spray can is that Im doing such a large surface. Not to mention I've got a spray gun and was planning on using that. But, Im open to suggestions. In your experience...how far will 1 can of that lacquer go?
     
  4. Pete Mazz

    Pete Mazz Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    May 17, 2000
    Messages:
    761
    Likes Received:
    0
    I use black lacquer followed by multiple coats/sanding of clear gloss lacquer, followed by a final buff out using polishing compound.

    Pete
     
  5. BillSuneson

    BillSuneson Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2005
    Messages:
    128
    Likes Received:
    0
    the black lacquer spray that i was talking about went through a can pretty quick about 1 coat was 1 can, i was very generous putting it on so that may be why it turned out good. sorry i haven't posted pics, my camera was broken by my fiancee at a party and we have yet to get a new one.
     
  6. Greg Monfort

    Greg Monfort Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    May 30, 2000
    Messages:
    884
    Likes Received:
    0
  7. Jack Gilvey

    Jack Gilvey Producer

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 1999
    Messages:
    4,948
    Likes Received:
    0
    Wow, first Tony G comes back, now Greg M! What's up, Greg? [​IMG]
     
  8. Foster_G

    Foster_G Agent

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2005
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    0
    I prefer the "auto body" way. To me, you get a deeper look to your project. It also makes for easier touchups since the clear cloat is its own layer rather than being mixed in with a color. If you scratch it you can just spray another coat on and sand it smooth with some 2000 grit sandpaper (Walmart, $3) and use some polishing compound to smooth it all out and you're good as new. Sure it'll takes more steps to do, but the result can be amazing.
     
  9. Kevin G.

    Kevin G. Second Unit

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2003
    Messages:
    403
    Likes Received:
    0
    Guys, I have painted cars for many years, and It really depends, like anything, how much money and time you want to spend...You can do the "autobody" method with lacquer as well.
    Prime and block sand with incrementally finer grits to get that flat flat surface. Paint with lacquer, or urethane base/clear. Urethane is stronger and more durable, will repair easily, and take a hit or scratch, and for the most part, polish out. Urethane, however is much more expensive.
     
  10. Chris Tsutsui

    Chris Tsutsui Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2002
    Messages:
    1,865
    Likes Received:
    0
    I've tried the Autobody way, but my paint turns out like a majority of autobody factory paint jobs...

    The surface has a tiny ripple like finish. Sure you can see your reflection and it's shiny... It's just not REALLY smooth like a nice piano finish.

    What I'd like to know, is how to get a paint job that looks like glass...
     
  11. Kevin G.

    Kevin G. Second Unit

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2003
    Messages:
    403
    Likes Received:
    0

    That's all in the prep work.
    As with any fine automobile or custom paint job...everything HAS to be sanded flat to have that surface to reflect. To do this we must prime and block, prime and block, prime and block, with consecutively finer grits.
    THEN we can finish with wet sanding, lay thin coats of color, sand in between coats if you're THAT fussy. Clear...with two thin coats, sanding between, with even finer grits...(1200 to 1500), Then lay on two medium-wet coats, wetsand with 2000 buff to gloss, polish and enjoy.
    So deep you will wet yourself.

    Spraying, as a rule, creates "orange peel", that is the nature of the beast, as it were. How we treat the panel or piece to be painted, beforehand, and during the spraying process is how we minimize the effect.
    Spraying with a slightly higher pressure will reduce the peel, over-reducing will reduce the peel, (but is more un-reliable as it can cause undesireable problems if you do not have a controlled environment.) temperature and humidity will greatly affect the overall outcome of any paintjob.
     
  12. Alex/d

    Alex/d Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2006
    Messages:
    95
    Likes Received:
    0
    Also... if you somehow happen to damage your coating at any time, the lacquer is MUCH easier to repair than the black base and clear coat IMHO. [​IMG]
    If you also, decide to "french polish" the wood... oh it's so beautiful. [​IMG]
     
  13. Alan M

    Alan M Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2003
    Messages:
    454
    Likes Received:
    0
    If your using the auto method,2 products will help you get that mirror finish.

    After sanding the clear coat with ultra fine sandpaper,

    Use "fine cut",this will remove swirls and small imperfections(will also dull the clear coat).
    Follow up with 3M's mirror glaze.This will bring back the gloss to the clear and give you a mirror finish.

    I've used this method on motorcycles and on speakers [​IMG]

    O,BTW,I use lacquer paint followed by urethane clear.
     

Share This Page