***Official 7th Annual HTF October Scary Movie Challenge***

Discussion in 'Movies' started by Matt Stone, Sep 29, 2006.

  1. Mario Gauci

    Mario Gauci Cinematographer

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    It's virtually impossible to keep up with what everyone's watching but I just saw Steve Gon's Netflix queue listing:

    The Black Pit of Dr. M, The Devil Rides Out, Nightmare City, The Unknown (Lon Chaney), It's Alive, Gemini (J-horror), Psycho III, VIY, Blood and Black Lace

    I'm glad I kind of pushed you into the direction of the first one but I'm surprised you have (I assume) never watched THE DEVIL RIDES OUT (1968) and BLOOD AND BLACK LACE (1964). The former is one of Hammer's best, in my humble opinion and the latter is the zenith of Mario Bava's work and the giallo genre.

    I wasn't all that crazy about THE UNKNOWN (1927) upon first viewing but have warmed up to it considerably on subsequent viewings. IT'S ALIVE (1974) is the first (and best) of the trilogy and undeniably effective despite the preposterous premise.

    VIY (1967) is one blind purchase I certainly don't regret and, even if I have yet to give it another spin myself, I feel it's my duty to warn you not to watch the trailer before the main feature...unless you want to spoil the rather splendid climax as it did for me[​IMG]!!
     
  2. Michael Elliott

    Michael Elliott Lead Actor

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    At home now: Motor Home Massacre [​IMG], House of the Damned, Murder Rock, Dracula Prisoner of Frankenstein, Let Sleeping Corpses Lie, Crocodile (Hooper version)

    In the queue:

    Visitor Q
    Revenge of the Living Dead Girls
    Cemetery Man
    Tourist Trap
    The Flying Serpent
    Equinox
    Ringu
    Infection
    Two Orphan Vampires
    Blood Freak
    Aftermath / Genesis: Double Feature



    Lugosi: Hollywood's Dracula (1997) [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

    Good documentary covering Bela Lugosi's early career up to his death. I wish the doc discussed his films more than his private life but it's still worth watching for fans.

    That's the Spirit (1933) [​IMG][​IMG]

    F.E. Miller and Mantan Moreland short has the two getting a job in a haunted pawn shop. There are are few laughs scattered throughout this thing, although I'm sure a lot of people will find the rather politically incorrect humor disturbing. The special effects are also quite nice for the period.

    Midnight Menace (1946) [​IMG]

    Forgotten, all black cast horror short about a strange voodoo man who can kill women and then move their bodies wherever he wants. This time out his just wants to torment Lollypop Jones with a body that keeps showing up no matter where he goes. This ultra low-budget film really doesn't have anything going for it other than just being a curiosity. The comedy is really bad and the mystery isn't any better.

    Monkey's Paw, The (1948) [​IMG][​IMG]

    British version of the famous story has two elderly folks getting the monkey's paw, which will grant three wishes but usually follows those wishes with tragedy. The father wishes for riches and gets them but his son is killed at the same time. Then, the couple wish for their son to return to life. The horror elements of this thing are discussed and talked about for the first sixty minutes and then finally happen during the last three. I see there are many other versions of this out there and I'm sure one has to be better than this rather disappointing film.

    Host to a Ghost (1941) [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

    Pretty good Andy Clyde short has him going to an old house to do repairs when Northern and Southern Civil War ghosts show up to do battle. This is the first film I've seen from Clyde and it took a little while to warm up to his humor but overall I really enjoyed this short. There are plenty of laughs as well as a couple nice horror set pieces.



    2006 Horror Challenge

    01. Crime of Dr. Crespi, The (1935) [​IMG][​IMG]
    02. Missing Guest, The (1938) [​IMG][​IMG]
    03. Torture Ship (1939) [​IMG][​IMG]
    04. Hand of Death (1962) [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    05. Last Shark, The (1981) [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    06. School Killer (2001) [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    07. Blackenstein (1973) [​IMG][​IMG]
    08. Dr. Black, Mr. Hyde (1976) [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    09. You'll Find Out (1940) [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    10. Weird Woman (1944) [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    11. Dead Man's Eyes (1944) [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    12. Jess Franco's Perversions (2005) [​IMG][​IMG]
    13. Oomo-Oomo, The Shark God (1949) [​IMG][​IMG]
    14. Terror From the Year 5000 (1958) [​IMG][​IMG]
    15. Zombie '90 Extreme Pestilence (1991) [​IMG][​IMG]
    16. House of Terror (1959) [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    17. Chaos (2005) [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    18. I'll Always Know What You Did Last Summer (2006) [​IMG][​IMG]
    19. Imprint (2006) [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    20. Lugosi: Hollywood's Dracula (1997) [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    21. That's the Spirit (1933) [​IMG][​IMG]
    22. Midnight Menace (1946) [​IMG]
    23. Monkey's Paw, The (1948) [​IMG][​IMG]
    24. Host to a Ghost (1941) [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

     
  3. Mario Gauci

    Mario Gauci Cinematographer

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    10/06/06: LONG WEEKEND (Colin Eggleston, 1978) ***

    With the obvious exceptions of Peter Weir’s THE CARS THAT ATE PARIS (1974) and THE LAST WAVE (1977) – not to mention the recent TEXAS CHAIN SAW-clone that goes by the name of WOLF CREEK (2004) – I’d say that Australian horror films are pretty rare. Therefore, while I was vaguely aware of this one, I have to say that upon watching it I found the film to be a surprisingly satisfying experience…in fact, quite a “sleeper”, if you will!

    Made on an obviously low-budget, this deliberately-paced chiller about a married couple on the verge of divorce deciding to spend their last weekend together at a remote beach (which nobody seems too sure if it really exists) could easily have turned out into another lazy DELIVERANCE (1972) rip-off – by way of WHO’S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF? (1966) – but, while the city people vs. unforgiving nature theme is certainly there, the film adds a genuinely unsettling ambience of helplessness which is further punctuated by the eerie noises emanating from the soundtrack the more the events take a weirder bent.

    The film only has two lead actors but John Hargreaves’ performance is particularly impressive as he grows increasingly baffled by his wife’s reluctance to go through with the trip and, eventually, outright hostility to him, as well as by the sheer unpredictability of nature’s “attacks” on the bickering couple: rotting food; malfunctioning equipment; an unlucky kangaroo is repeatedly trampled early on; a flock of birds inexplicably dives into the windshield of their vehicle; a roving possum; the corpse of a “sea cow” which won’t stay still(!) and even an eagle in search of its mislaid egg!! The fact that the animals prey on their human antagonists for no apparent reason brings up comparisons with Alfred Hitchcock’s THE BIRDS (1963) and there’s even an unexpected dash of symbolism when the wailing cries of the orphaned sea cow pup start to haunt the couple who, we later learn, have gone through an abortion in the past; the fate of the aforementioned eagle’s egg also adds to this disquieting element. To this is added a mystery ingredient when the other car the husband saw on his hunting excursions ends up at the bottom of the sea. Anyway, I won’t spoil the twist towards the end (which, though I could see coming, is still imaginatively handled) or the terrific conclusion, which I’ll just say was effectively bleak!

    While I only watched this via Optimum’s no-frills R2 DVD, I realize that there is an excellent R1 SE alternative from Synapse which I might decide to add to my collection eventually…


    10/07/06: THE BRAINIAC (Chano Urueta, 1962) **

    After five relatively straight Mexican horror films – and despite being aware of the camp value of this one – I wasn’t prepared for the laugh riot that THE BRAINIAC turned out to be…though, in retrospect, I guess I ought to have known judging from the brief snippets from it in the Eurotika documentary on Mexican horror films (available on the Region 2 Mondo Macabro DVD of EL VAMPIRO [1957])!

    Its defenders suggest that the film was intended as a spoof; I may agree about that, given the fact that director Urueta had helmed one of the starkest examples of the genre I’ve seen so far – THE WITCH’S MIRROR (1960) – but that still doesn’t explain why it should have been so goofy and nonsensical!! The film’s credit sequence utilizes some of the sketches seen in the prologue of THE WITCH’S MIRROR(!), followed by a reasonably atmospheric sorcerer’s trial and burning – though even these scenes don’t escape hilarity due to the absurdly elongated list of accuses read before the court, the constantly grinning Klansmen-like judges and guards (on whom the Baron eventually plays a childish supernatural prank!), and the outrageous Pope-like costume the victim is made to wear for his execution. The astrology sequences are, again, long-winded yet impossibly naïve (with all the professor’s theories, when his assistant looks into the telescope and tells him there’s no trace of the comet, the former suggests that its trajectory may be entirely different to his calculations – but, then, it takes the leading lady a split-second to locate it!).

    The special effects are unbelievably cheesy – especially the stationary comet; even more ridiculous is the monster’s make-up with its large pulsating head, pointed nose, forked protruding tongue, long scruffy hair and hose-like fingers (the scene where he swipes the clothes of his first victim and leaves the dead man in his underwear is hilarious)! The Baron returns to Earth obviously to exact revenge on his judges’ decendants, though God only knows why he needs to turn into a hideous, brain-draining creature in order to do so – I guess, the film wouldn’t have become such a cult item otherwise! – but he occasionally adds new victims (such as the girl in a bar – which we’re supposed to believe that it all happens without the other people noticing anything! – and a streetwalker, a scene accompanied by some particularly sleazy jazz music) which, if anything, serve to pad out the running-time (but still amounting to a brief 77 minutes) given the thinness of the plotline!

    Anyway, the Baron invites all his intended victims to his gothic mansion – explained by a quick reference to a jewel robbery in a police procedural scene– complete with cadaverous butler (how he knew where to find them, to say nothing of the fact that any of them would accept an invitiation from a perfect stranger, I guess, never even crossed the screenwriters’ minds!): here we witness another hilarious moment as the faces of the Inquisitors are dissolved onto those of their descendants, premusably for us to note the kinship between them, but this is only apparent in three of the cases – and that’s because the same actors are used! So, he insinuates himself into each of their households and, turning into the Brainiac, kills them all – save for the last member, obviously the heroine; another rib-cracking moment occurs here when he excuses himelf to his guests (who have come to him rather than the other way around) – sitting on the sofa merely feet away – so as to go to the cupboard where he keeps his supply of brains in a jar and nibble from it (actually, he does this a number of times, on each occasion complaining of an old ailment for which he needs a special medicine!).

    Comic relief is provided by the clumsy assistant (with a penchant for American slang) of bald-headed cop David Silva; they finally catch up with the fiendish Baron and arrive at his house armed with flamethrowers (one of which refuses to work!) and they fry him – though he never actually catches fire and, when he finally dissolves into a skeleton, parts of his body are inconspicuously missing!! However, for me, these are the five moments in the film which make it a camp classic: Abel Salazar laughing at his accusers in the opening trial sequence, and then turning serious all of a sudden when the Inquisitors throw him a severe look; the rock falling from the sky announcing the arrival of The Brainiac; German Robles’ paralyzed look while the monster is feeding on his voluptuous daughter; Rene Cardona’s similar gaze – but, this time, he seems to be doing his damnedest to suppress laughter!; and the corpse hanging upside down (face underwater) in the bathtub.

    The supplements, even more than the other Casanegra releases, impart the fun that the film so obviously provides; as with THE WITCH’S MIRROR, the Audio Commentary itself is a gas – even if, in that film’s case, the subtext was discussed as well while it’s not here…but that’s because there isn’t any!! As I had never watched the film before, I couldn’t compare it to previous editions; suffice to say that that the transfer isn’t problematic save for the very last scene – where, for a couple of minutes, there’s the presence of some distracting extraneous flickering (that’s how I can best describe it!) that, in all the reviews of the disc I’ve come across, is mentioned only by DVD Savant.


    10/07/06: NIGHT OF THE BLOODY APES [Original Spanish-Language Version] (Rene Cardona, 1969) **
    10/08/06: NIGHT OF THE BLOODY APES [Alternate U.S. Version] (Rene Cardona, 1969) **

    This is another notorious Mexican horror film: however, while the original Spanish-language version is quite tame, all sorts of gore and nudity were inserted for the English-dubbed variant (prepared by Jerald Intrator – who did similar duties on THE CURIOUS DR. HUMPP [1967/71] – and, like the U.S. version of that film, had previously been available DVD through Something Weird/Image)!

    I watched the original first and, while no great shakes, it was fairly engaging – especially with a plot as familiar as this one was: a doctor goes beyond the call of duty in attempting to save the life of his terminally ill son; he even has a hulking, game-legged assistant (played by Carlos Lopez Moctezuma, who had essayed a strikingly similar role – though in a more sinister vein – in THE CURSE OF THE CRYING WOMAN [1961]). I know that several Mexican films mingled horror with the “Lucha Libre” (Wrestling) genre but I had never watched one myself; this element is present here – in fact, the heroine is a wrestler – but the two styles are, perhaps thankfully, kept apart (that said, the wrestling sequences are competently done, with some of the moves proving highly amusing).

    The doctor’s son is transformed into a monster (looking like The Incredible Hulk with mud splashed over his face!) after having had an ape’s heart transplanted into him – but, then, when this is replaced with that of a comatose female wrestler, he stays this way and grows a pair of fangs to boot (shouldn’t he realistically have turned into a transsexual…though I guess that wouldn’t have been very interesting)!! The climactic rooftop sequence in which the monster kidnaps a child and meets his demise at the hands of the police is reminiscent of THE GHOST OF FRANKENSTEIN (1942). My favorite unintentionally funny moments in the film, however, occur when the doctor, trying to comfort his son, tells him that he’ll soon be cured – only to turn his back soon after on the verge of tears – and also the impatient look he gives his crippled assistant (as the latter staggers slowly into the car) when they’re about to chase the monster who has escaped from the lab.

    The alternate nude scenes work for the film (these were actually done by Cardona himself for a racier Mexican version entitled HORROR Y SEXO) but its reputation is largely based on the added material showing over-the-top violence, such as an eyeball being gouged out of its socket, a scalping and even a person’s head being torn off. There are also several graphic operation inserts which, however, give rise to a goof: while it’s made clear that only two people are involved in the operation, we see a third pair of hands constantly holding an oxygen mask to the patient’s face!

    The film is also said to be a loose remake of Cardona’s own black-and-white horror film DOCTOR OF DOOM (1962) but, since I haven’t watched that one, I can’t say how much of it was actually pilfered for NIGHT OF THE BLOODY APES…
     
  4. Patrick Nevin

    Patrick Nevin Stunt Coordinator

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    John, R. Lee was really good in this. I thought he was the strongest actor in the film. I don't know why but I was on the fence on who to cheer for the whole movie. Maybe when it comes out on DVD i can watch it late at night and will scare the crap out of me.
     
  5. Joe Karlosi

    Joe Karlosi Producer

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    Thanks for pointing that out to me, Mario. I always get those two names mixed up. I think this is a good example why I don't "always" subscribe to the "auteur theory" for every director; I think Neill's THE BLACK ROOM is so much better directed and with more style than either FMTWM or Neills' Holmes films - and yet they're done by the same guy.
     
  6. Jason Roer

    Jason Roer Supporting Actor

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    Hey All,

    Got 4 new ones to tell about:

    Bubba Ho-Tep - 4/5 - It sounded like a great idea and I loved it. Bruce Campbell serves up a great performance as Elvis Presley, who has decided he no longer wants to be the King and switches places with an Elvis impersonator. The impersonator has a real bad heart and dies. Elvis goes on performing as an Elvis impersonator and has a bit of an accident and winds up in a nursing home some years later where he befriends a black man who thinks he's JFK! An egyptian mummy is stalking the nursing home to suck the souls of the patients and it's up to Elvis and the fake JFK to stop him. So much fun in this one. Give it a view!

    30 Days in Hell (Documentary for the making of Devil's Rejects) - 4/5 - I love the Devil's Rejects. I think it's one of the best modern horror flicks out there. I'm particularly impressed with with the growth Rob Zombie showed as a director between House of a Thousand Corpses and Devil's. Anyway, this documentary was an absolute whirlwind of information on what goes down in the making of a film. I mean it even goes so far as to tell you what scenes were filmed on what days so you could see what they were able to accomplish. It's a great resource for anyone who wants to make a film, be it a short or a feature. Highly Recommended!

    The Hills Have Eyes (2006) - 1/5 - ABSOLUTELY DREADFUL. I am so sick of the modern horror trope where they decide to slam a loud THUNK or DRONE in place of an actual scare/creepy image. I even had a lengthy discussion about this recently and pointed out that in most modern horror flicks it's usually the sudden loud sounds that make the audience jump. It's not the creepy atmosphere or dread set up by a true master of the genre, it's a natural human reaction to a jarring noise. And it makes someone think they've been scared by what they've seen/experienced. It's cheap and it's pathetic and it's really annoying. And that's the only scares they could serve up in this one. It was poorly written. It had characters doing insanely stupid things. The acting actually wasn't so terrible, but what I found most disturbing about this film was the fact that they have the perfect environment to create a moody and nerve racking atmosphere and they failed! I can't say how they screwed it up, but they did. Here's hoping Martin Weisz can get this franchise going with the sequel.

    Session 9 3/5 - Here is a perfect example of sound design that has been executed flawlessly. It works so well within the confines of the film that it almost becomes another character. It adds a rich and almost textural layer to the film and a geniune unsettling presence. It's one of the better sound designs I've heard in years. This felt more like a Hitchockian Thriller to me and I felt a sense of dread throughout most of the film. I've heard this story many time before in many other films and books, however, I think Brad did a wonderful job with it and I would recommend it.


    2006 HORROR MOIVE CHALLENGE
    1. Desperation 2/5
    2. Sleepaway Camp 2/5
    3. Cannibal!: The Musical 2/5
    4. Bubba Ho-Tep 4/5
    5. 30 Days in Hell 4/5
    6. The Hills Have Eyes (2006) 1/5
    7. Session 9 3/5
     
  7. SteveGon

    SteveGon Executive Producer

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    Salem's Lot - Solid, entertaining telefilm adaptation of Stephen King's novel. Not much else to say except that I'd forgotten what a nice little number Bonnie Bedelia was in her prime.

    *** out of ****
     
  8. EricSchulz

    EricSchulz Producer

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    Rick Spruill:
    Is Spoorloos the original (Dutch maybe???) title of The Vanishing? LOVED that movie! The ending seemed like one of those that was logical, but would never fly with US audiences that want "happy" endings!
     
  9. JohnRice

    JohnRice Lead Actor

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    That's the one.
     
  10. BrettGallman

    BrettGallman Screenwriter

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    Okay, I'm finally jumping in after having a weekend free to watch some movies. First viewings will be in bold.

    October 5th:
    1. Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974): 4.5/5 Still one of the greatest horror movies of all time.

    2. Texas Chainsaw Massacre (2003): 3.5/5 A decent remake, but doesn't really hold up after watching it back to back with the original.

    October 6th:
    3. Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning: 2.5/5 This felt like a remake of the 2004 film. Pretty mediocre, but some good gore.

    4. A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: 5/5 My favorite horror movie ever. A must-watch for me every year.

    5. Freddy's Dead: The Final Nightmare: 3.5/5 Not as bad as most people say. It does a lot right (Twin Peaks-esque Springwood, good characters, interesting plot), but it does a lot wrong too (some of the humor goes overboard). I still like it though.

    October 7th:
    6. Night of the Living Dead (1968): 4.5/5 Not much I can say about this one that hasn't already been said.

    7. Land of the Dead: 4/5 The best horror film to be released in the last few years, in my opinion.
     
  11. SteveS.

    SteveS. Auditioning

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    4. The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (original). 3/5. This is the first time I have seen it. I honestly didn't like it as much as I thought I would. Damn near every opinion concerning the TCM series that I have read believes this version is significantly better than the 2003 remake. I definitely do not agree. I enjoyed the remake a lot more than this one. Maybe people didn't like the remake because it was not true to the original, but if you leave that fact out of the equation, it is a much better movie. Who knows, maybe I would feel differently about this if I had seen the original before the '03 version. Oh well, on to the next flick.

    Running total on Page 2 post #38.
     
  12. Joe Karlosi

    Joe Karlosi Producer

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    Well, Steve, this is one of the reasons why I'm not keen on 21st Century remakes. In some cases (like yours here) it dulls the impact of the original. Not always, thankfully, but sometimes.

    But good for you that you enjoyed the 2003 re-do. I've heard from a few people that it's actually pretty good.
     
  13. Michael Elliott

    Michael Elliott Lead Actor

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    I saw the original first and still think it's a VERY overrated movie. A good movie but nothing great. All the hype and cream that gets thrown on TCM should go to THE HILLS HAVE EYES, which is a lot better IMO. Both remakes, while decent, go for gore over atmosphere. Atmosphere is the one thing missing in most horror films today.



    Motor Home Massacre (2005) BOMB

    Horrid direct to DVD film about seven teens who take a motor home out and are eventually murdered. Much like the horrid direct to VHS horror films of the 1980s, this here features bad acting, bad directing, a bad screenplay and horrid special effects. I think I laughed once during the film and that was it for anything.

    Absurd (1981) [​IMG][​IMG]

    Joe D'Amato directs this sequel to his very own Anthropophagous, which has George Eastman returning as another monster on the rampage. I guess the first film made so much money they tried to cash in by calling this a sequel but it's pretty much its own film without any connection to the first one. This film here plays more like a rip off of Halloween and this is especially true during the ending, which tries to build suspense like the Carpenter film but it's really what brings the movie down a few notches. Eastman is always worth watching and the special effects are very good.

    Frankenstein (1931) [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

    There's really nothing more I can say about this film that I haven't said countless times before. Certainly one of the greatest horror films of all time. I watched this via the new DVD and I found the transfer to be quite stunning. It was really like watching this film for the first time and that's coming from someone who has seen this dozens of times throughout the years. I also watched this for the first time being projected on a larger screen and it certainly made the monster a lot more menacing. The ending still packs one hell of a punch after 75 years.

    Frankenstein (1910) [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

    As I said earlier in this thread, this Edison version of the story gets better with each new viewing. Having seen probably 500 films from 1890-1910, the special effects here are terrific and the creation of the monster is rather thrilling.

    Ninth Guest, The (1934) [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

    Forgotten horror/mystery from director Roy William Neill turned out to be a real gem. Eight people are gathered at a house for a party, none of them knowing who invited them. Then a radio turns on and the host announces that before morning all but one will be dead. The film only runs 65-minutes but there's some nice suspense in the film as we never know who's doing the killing and why he has such an interest in these eight people and their dirty secrets. The great twist ending was ruined because I read a review over at the IMDB but I still had a good time getting there.



    2006 Horror Challenge

    01. Crime of Dr. Crespi, The (1935) [​IMG][​IMG]
    02. Missing Guest, The (1938) [​IMG][​IMG]
    03. Torture Ship (1939) [​IMG][​IMG]
    04. Hand of Death (1962) [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    05. Last Shark, The (1981) [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    06. School Killer (2001) [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    07. Blackenstein (1973) [​IMG][​IMG]
    08. Dr. Black, Mr. Hyde (1976) [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    09. You'll Find Out (1940) [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    10. Weird Woman (1944) [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    11. Dead Man's Eyes (1944) [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    12. Jess Franco's Perversions (2005) [​IMG][​IMG]
    13. Oomo-Oomo, The Shark God (1949) [​IMG][​IMG]
    14. Terror From the Year 5000 (1958) [​IMG][​IMG]
    15. Zombie '90 Extreme Pestilence (1991) [​IMG][​IMG]
    16. House of Terror (1959) [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    17. Chaos (2005) [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    18. I'll Always Know What You Did Last Summer (2006) [​IMG][​IMG]
    19. Imprint (2006) [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    20. Lugosi: Hollywood's Dracula (1997) [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    21. That's the Spirit (1933) [​IMG][​IMG]
    22. Midnight Menace (1946) [​IMG]
    23. Monkey's Paw, The (1948) [​IMG][​IMG]
    24. Host to a Ghost (1941) [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    25. Motor Home Massacre (2005) BOMB
    26. Absurd (1981) [​IMG][​IMG]
    27. Frankenstein (1931) [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    28. Frankenstein (1910) [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    29. Ninth Guest, The (1934) [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

     
  14. Patrick Nevin

    Patrick Nevin Stunt Coordinator

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    Night Of The Living Dead - I agree that nothing more can be said about this classic. I don't know why but it had a Halloween feeling while watching it.
    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]1/2 out of [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]


    2006 Scary Movie Challenge - new in BOLD
    1. Zombie [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG] out of [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    2. Hellmaster [​IMG][​IMG] out of [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    3. Return To Horror High [​IMG] out of [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    4. Ghost Story [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG] out of [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    5. The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning [​IMG][​IMG] out of [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    6. Night Of The Living Dead - [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]1/2 out of [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
  15. JohnRice

    JohnRice Lead Actor

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    Where do you guys get the 1910 Frankenstein?
     
  16. Joe Karlosi

    Joe Karlosi Producer

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    Yeah. I wish I had a copy; that 10-minute feature would get me another easily "viewed" film to add to the challenge! [​IMG]
     
  17. JohnRice

    JohnRice Lead Actor

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    Damn, it's only 16 minutes...
     
  18. Brian Kissinger

    Brian Kissinger Screenwriter

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    I enjoyed the film very much, but I just think I would have possibly loved the film had I went in without the preconceived notions. Some films get better each time you watch them, because you pick up on little things you may have overlooked upon first viewing, and I have a suspicion this may be one of those, but it'll never have the emotional impact the film deserves. And that saddens be a bit. It's still a good movie, one I'll most definitely watch again, but I can't help but feel a little robbed. On the flip side, I can't say I would have, for certain, viewed the film without all the hub-bub I heard about it. Damn the irony.


    Exorcist: The Beginning (2004)
    Renny Harlin

    Dominion: Prequel to the Exorcist (2005)
    Paul Schrader

    I'm counting one of these as a first viewing even though I had seen part of it before. To be honest, I'm not even sure which one is which. I caught both on HBO over the weekend, and can't honestly say I enjoyed/disliked one over the other. The opening/flashback sequence with the Nazi's was an attention grabber, but the rest of the films felt forced. I knew the priest would find his faith again, but it wasn't ever a matter of if, but when. And I guess that's both films in a nutshell. No rhyme or emotion, just a "here you go."


    Spider Baby (1968)
    Jack Hill

    My good friend Steve (SteveGon) decided I needed to add a little culture to my Challenge this year and offered up some films for me to view. Now this is almost always a mixed bag for me. Many times he hooks me up with a groovy film I most likely would never have seen, and I go "Cool. That was pretty darn good." Such was the case with Spider Baby. This was a very enjoyable 90 minutes with surprisingly good acting, and a neat little story. And while you pretty much got what the entire movie would be in the first few minutes, it was still a fun and funny ride. But then other times, he gives me a movie and I go ......


    Nuit des traquées, La/The Night of the Hunted (1980)
    Jean Rollin

    "What in the Blue Hell was that?" Oh Steve and his love for the French. To be honest, this really doesn't qualify as horror, but I guess anytime a chick ends up with a pair of scissors in her eyes, you can't nitpick too much. As best I can tell, should you lose your memory (and the capacity to remember anything over one minute) you'll get real horny and resort to homicidal/suicidal tendencies. I'm sure if I were to try, I could find a message in this film somewhere, but so much of it never made sense. And I'm not talking about the "big picture" but all the little things that one can often overlook. For instance, why does the girl have no clothes in her escape, but socks and sneakers? Plus with all the nudity (and mind you there is plenty.....this one gets a high rating on the brian "shallow" scale) I never once saw a girl with hairy armpits. Isn't that what French ladies are famous for. (damn me and my preconceived notions [​IMG] ) The only other thing that made me not totally damn Steve and practice witchcraft in order to gain back that hour and a half from my life (the first being the aforementioned nudity) was a groovy scene early in the film. After a torrid session of love-making, I thought to myself, "If this were real, the dude would make a lame excuse to Get the Hell out of Dodge." And wouldn't you know it, he "suddenly" has to leave. Of course it wasn't for that reason, but mainly to further the story but it still made me laugh.


    1. The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (2003) C
    2. Dawn of the Dead (2004) A-
    3. Haute Tension B-
    4. Ghost in a Teeny Bikini
    D
    5. The Shining A-
    6. Friday the 13th Part VII: The New Blood C
    7. Audition B
    8. Exorcist: The Beginning C-
    9. Dominion: Prequel to the Exorcist C-
    10. Spider Baby B
    11. The Night of the Hunted D-
     
  19. SteveGon

    SteveGon Executive Producer

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    Reptilicus - There's something rotten in Denmark....and it's this movie! A regenerated prehistoric acid slime-belching reptilian dinosaur rampages through Denmark (would anyone notice besides the Danes?), eating cows and sliming people. Cheap and dull. Wherefore art thou, Hamlet?

    *1/2 out of ****

    Next up: Battlefield Baseball, Lucky, Halloween II (revisit) and Frankenstein (2004)
     
  20. SteveGon

    SteveGon Executive Producer

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    Oh, I don't know - I think The Night of the Hunted qualifies as horror about as much as anything David Cronenberg (whose work it reminded me of) has done. Yeah, it's a flaky film that doesn't totally work, but it does possess a strange ambience that really worked for me. Anyway, I knew this would be an iffy one for ya, but I figured you'd at least appreciate that smokin' little redhead. [​IMG]

    Glad you enjoyed Spider-Baby. [​IMG]
     

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