Need help to connect S-video Laserdisc player output to Optoma projector without S-video input

Discussion in 'Playback Devices' started by Tony Int, Aug 10, 2010.

  1. Tony Int

    Tony Int Agent

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    My laserdisc player has s-video and composite outputs, however I now have an Optoma projector that does not have an S-video input.
    I would prefer not to have to use the composite input and was hoping for some suggestions in the best way to convert the laserdisc S-video to an input that is available on the projector. The projector has HDMI, component, VGA/SCART and composite.


    Thanks.
     
  2. Todd Erwin

    Todd Erwin Cinematographer
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    I think you can get an S-Video to Component adapter cable from most electronics stores, or ask a friend if they have one left over from a video card upgrade on their PC. Most video card vendors include this adapter.
     
  3. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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    Use composite. LaserDisc is a native composite format.
     
  4. GeorgeAB

    GeorgeAB Second Unit

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    Yes, S-Video outputs started showing up on LD players in response to a market perception of the superiority of S-Video over composite. This was a result of an increased availability and popularity of Super BetaMax and S-VHS tape machines and camcorders. Composite was converted to S-Video inside the LD player, even though the program on the disc is natively composite. This dubious feature in LD players was only of value if the converter in the player was superior to the converter in the display. In many cases, picture quality was better when using the composite output of the player, especially in the lower and mid priced players of the day. Cable length was also a factor, since S-Video cable was more prone to signal degradation over longer runs.

     

    Best regards and beautiful pictures,

    G. Alan Brown, President

    CinemaQuest, Inc.

    A Lion AV Consultants Affiliate

     

    "Advancing the art and science of electronic imaging"
     
  5. Tony Int

    Tony Int Agent

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    Interesting information. I had no idea. I hooked it up last night and enjoyed my CAV disc of [as far as I know it is the closest to the theatrical version] Who Framed Roger Rabbit lol. Thanks for all the suggestions and info. Tony
     
  6. John A. Casler

    John A. Casler Second Unit

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    While I too suggest that the composite and S-Video will likely be virtually the same, your other optionn if you have an AVR that will upconvert (actually transcode) to HDMI is to run the signal through upconversion of the AVR.
     
  7. bigshot

    bigshot Cinematographer

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    Composite is identical to s video on laserdisc players
     
  8. Tony Int

    Tony Int Agent

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    I never knew that. I feel kind of silly knowing that now, because although I do not recall the moment, I am sure I "saw" an upgrade in video quality years ago when I switched from composite to s-video. lol.
     
  9. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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    It's possible that the LD player you used years ago had a better comb filter than the TV you were using.  Not probable though.
     
  10. Eddie L

    Eddie L Stunt Coordinator

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    OK, I'm kinda in the same boat and started my own thread "I need a new plan..." listed in the receivers forum.

    I'm looking for a new receiver to hook up to my Pioneer CLD-99 LD player and was looking for one that had S-video in and I'm leaning toward the Denon AVR-791

    Here was my reply to this same question as to composite vs. S-video.....

    I have always regarded S-video far superior to composite on the CLD-99, which I have. My older projector (Yamaha DPX-1) has both inputs, and just running cables straight from the player to the projector was a no brainer in deciding which to use. Until I just read these replies, I would never have thought composite was the way to go. So I did a little reseach on my own and went here:

    http://www.laserdiscarchive.co.uk/laserdisc_archive/pioneer/pioneer_elite_cld-99/pioneer_elite_cld-99.htm

    It's an article I found comparing the CLD-97 to the 99

    Now I'm not any kind of techie by any means, but it seems that the big difference with this player is the 3D adaptive digital Y/C filter for S-video output

    most of the info pertaining to this subject starts about 1/2 way down the page and then again in the summary

     

    OK, now with that said, whatever method I used, wouldn't the Denon upgrade the signal and pass it thru the HDMI output?

    or no it can't upgrade from S-video signal to HDMI ?

     

    Thanks for any help,

    Ed
     
  11. Eddie L

    Eddie L Stunt Coordinator

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    Rachael B had a good tip for me at my "I need a new plan" thread on receivers

    here it is:

     

    Consider getting a video processor that has Composite/S-video in and Component video out. You could get one of the early models of the DVDO iscan for a song. I use an iscan V2 for my LD-S9 to give it component output. For you, I'd suggest you find a video processor that has a 3-D comb filter, which the V2 does not, and use composite video out of the 99. So, you ask why. The comb filter in the 99 does indeed reduce dot crawl but the cost is that your colour gets muted by the 99's comb filter. It's a 1995 comb filter and it wasn't even Pioneer's best at that time. Their best comb was in the LD-S9, a Japanese model, that's similar to the 99 and in their RP sets. You're missing full colour fidelity using the 99's S-video out.

     

    I also have a 99 and I use it's composite out these days. The 99's 3-D comb might have been near the top of the class in '95 but a year or two later it was a mediocre comb filter.
     
  12. ChristopherDAC

    ChristopherDAC Producer

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    Connect the LD player to the receiver via composite video, & let the Denon pass the video out through HDMI. That's the safest route, with the least processing, & should yield the best results overall.
     

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