need freq. range of instruments

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Ray R, Mar 3, 2002.

  1. Ray R

    Ray R Stunt Coordinator

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    There have been several posts about which sub is better for music and how to set up a sub so that it integrates more seamlessly with the main speakers. I recall a while ago coming across some information about the frequency range of rock music instruments. What suprised me was that the bass guitar and bass drum do not extend down that low in the frequency range. Unfortunately I can't remember the numbers and that's the purpose of my post. Does anyone have a link to a chart with frequency ranges of instruments?

    It would be very helpful, because I think many of us are assuming these instruments have a lower range than they actually do.
     
  2. John Kotches

    John Kotches Cinematographer

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    Ray,

    I can't point you to a chart, however.....

    The Bottom note of an acoustic piano (A0) is 27.5Hz.

    A 5 string Bass Buitar has a lowest fundamental of ca. 30Hz.

    A typical 4 string Bass Guitar has a lowest fundamental of ca. 41 Hz.

    An acoustic or electric guitar has a lowest fundamental of ca. 83Hz.

    The fundamental of a kick drum would be a function of its area and whether or not it's sealed on both sides.

    The reason I say fundamental is that tones are made up of fundamentals and a series of harmonics at integer intervals (2x, 3x, 4x etc). They aren't pure sine waves, we're talking about a complex waveform in other words.

    If you do some searches via google you will find precise charts for the various instruments but this will get you in the ball park.

    Regards,
     
  3. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

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    Ray,

    Don't know how low you're looking to go- but most rock records stick with 60ish and higher for the most part.

    The average Kick Dum usually thumps in the 80 range- I like to goose mine down in the high 60's-- but the bulk of the kick signal floats aroun 100hz (+/- 10). Of course, as mentioned above- this is dependent on the kick size and character- but the average 22 inch-ish rock drum throats at 90-100 and has body around 70 and then usually is dropped midrange and has a hump around 2k to for the pedal click/head pop.

    4 string bass, low E (E1) is 41 hz (low E on guitar is E2 which is 82hz)- although this may or may not be very present depending on how the bass was recorded, which mics and techniques were used (direct line yields more clean low-- but a lot of records are mixing a combination of direct and mic- with emphasis on Mics- and some mics just aren't doing the job when used in a close mic'ing scheme)- and of course what Key the song is in.

    Some of the newer rock bands like to Tune down a full step- and then drop their E string (which would be D in down step) down another step to C1- putting the lowest bass note at 32hz (and guitar at 65)

    This provides a bit more low rumble- but I would hesitate to call it musical-- when usually it results in simply more string noise as guitar strings are lacking in ability to vibrate that slowly when plucked, and usually you get more sound from them rattling then from the tone (like Korn for example).
     
  4. Ray R

    Ray R Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks for the info.

    This leads me to believe that for the most part frequency range is not a big factor in why some subs are not considered musical. Even most of the bargain subs are reasonable flat down to 41hz.
     
  5. Phil Iturralde

    Phil Iturralde Screenwriter

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    Key Frequencies: (Key Frequencies Chart)
    Voices Fullness at 120Hz; Boominess at 200 - 240Hz; Presence at 5kHz; Sibilance at 7.5kHz; Air at 12 - 15kHz.
    Harmonica Sounds "Fat" at 240Hz; will add "Bite" at 3 - 5kHz.
    Conga Resonant ring at 200 - 240kHz; Presence and "Slap" at 5kHz.
    Bass Guitar Attack or pluck is increased at 700 or 1kHz; Bottom will be added at 60 or 80Hz. String noise at 2.5kHz.
    Bass Drum "Slap" at 2.5kHz; Bottom at 60 or 80Hz.
    Snare Drum Fatness at 240Hz; Crispness at 1 - 2.5kHz; Bottom at 60 - 80Hz.
    Hi-Hat and Cymbals "Shimmer" at 7.5 - 10kHz; "Klang" or Gong sound at approx. 200Hz.
    Toms Attack at 5kHz; Fullness at 240Hz.
    Floor Toms Attack at 5kHz; Fullness at 80 or 120Hz.
    Electric Guitar Body at 240Hz; Clarity at 2.5kHz.
    Acoustic Guitar Body at 240Hz; Clarity at 2.5kHz; Bottom at 80 or 120Hz.
    Piano Body at 80 - 120Hz; Presence at 2.5 - 5kHz; Crispness at 10kHz; Honky-Tonk sound at 2.5kHz as bandwidth is narrowed. Resonance at 40 - 60Hz.
    Horns Fullness at 120 - 240Hz; Shrill at 7.5 or 5kHz.
    Phil
     

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