MPAA Snooping?

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by John Sturge, Jul 23, 2002.

  1. John Sturge

    John Sturge Stunt Coordinator

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    MPAA Snooping For Pirates
    For anyone that cares or missed it, an article about MPAA going after pirates.
     
  2. MikeAlletto

    MikeAlletto Cinematographer

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  3. Todd H

    Todd H Go Dawgs!

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    I find it interesting that hackers can now get life in prison, yet the MPAA wants to do the same thing and not be held accountable. Unacceptable.
     
  4. Dennis Reno

    Dennis Reno Supporting Actor

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    Anyone remember when the studios claimed they were working on a Napster alternative to allow people to purchase and download songs online? Someone even mentioned the ability to create custom CD's. Years later... nada.

    Now the MPAA wants to become the secret police of the 'net!
     
  5. Kevin P

    Kevin P Screenwriter

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    As I recall, the RIAA wanted to do something even more insiduous, as in hack into people's PCs and delete MP3s! I think that proposal got shot down as I haven't heard anything of it recently.

    Still, there's always workarounds. A pirated movie on a P2P network doesn't have to look like a pirated movie at first glance. This trick will only stop the dumb file sharers who leave files like "LordOfTheRings_1.mpg" on their shared drive!

    KJP
     
  6. Ryan Wright

    Ryan Wright Screenwriter

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  7. Thomas Newton

    Thomas Newton Screenwriter

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  8. MickeS

    MickeS Producer

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    The MPAA initiative, where they track the IP adress and sends a cease-and-desist letter is the least intrusive at least, and I understand them. It IS an illegal activity after all.

    But I wonder how they're going to do it, practically. I mean, there are hundreds of thousands of people doing this. I can't see the ISP's being interested in spending all their waking hours sending out cease-and-desist letters.

    /Mike
     
  9. Rob Gardiner

    Rob Gardiner Cinematographer

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    MPAA Admits to Unauthorized Movie Copying
    MPAA Finds Itself Accused of Piracy
     
  10. BrianW

    BrianW Cinematographer

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    The DMCA allows the copyright holder to demand the ISP to turn over the personal info of alleged pirates, so the copyright holders can take action (like sending a cease-and-desist letter). On the word of the copyright holder, under penalty of perjury, the ISP is also required to disconnect service to anyone alleged by the RIAA (again, under penalty of perjury) to be a pirate. The ISPs balked at this, and having the ISPs send the letters is a precedent-approved short-circuit compromise to the injunctive penalties called for by the DMCA. Although the ISPs now have to send the letters, and even disconnect service when commanded to do so by the copyright holder, they no longer have to turn over the personal information of their customers. Verizon, I believe, is the ISP that fought hardest to keep from having to turn over their customers' information to the RIAA.

    I've read several articles (sorry, no links, but I'll post them if I find them) about false accusations being leveled against individuals who have committed no crime. One case I remember in particular involved a research scientist whose entire staff's VPN access was shut down on the RIAA's allegation that he was a pirate. All his research came to a screeching halt. As it turned out, one of his data files was simply given a name that had a passing resemblance to a pop song title. Nevertheless, it took months of red tape to clear his name and restore his service.

    Funny, though... I don't recall reading any articles describing how anyone in the RIAA has been indicted for perjury for making these false accusations.
     
  11. Hunter P

    Hunter P Screenwriter

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    Um, yeah, good plan.[​IMG]
    Even if they convince your ISP to disconnect your service and give up that revenue, so what? Just go sign up with another provider who likes money.
     

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