Mitsubishi Lancer...

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Jay H, Oct 2, 2007.

  1. Jay H

    Jay H Producer

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    While on the subject of cars.... and ads, what's with the Mitsu Lancer ads who seem to espound on the Magnesium Paddle shifters as if say Aluminum paddle shifters are just not good enough??? What is it with stressing the Magnesium paddle shifters, why don't they just advertise, it has Paddle Shifters... What if they are Ti or Carbon Fiber or is CF now passe' and the new hot metal is Magnesium??????

    I don't get the whole magnesium thing as if that is a selling point...

    I should complain that this little piece of metal is not what I'm looking for and Mitsu lost a sale because of it. [​IMG]

    Jay
     
  2. Benovite

    Benovite Stunt Coordinator

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    I hope the magnesiwhatchamacallit isn't the only reason they lost your business! [​IMG]



    Btw I have titanium paddle shifters in my Lamberarri.[​IMG]
     
  3. KurtEP

    KurtEP Supporting Actor

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    Magnesium is actually kind of old school in racing, at least as far as wheels and things go.

    I hate the idea of paddle shifters, though. Real shifting is done with a clutch and a stick.
     
  4. Jay H

    Jay H Producer

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    Do you have a magnesium clutch pedal and stick? [​IMG]

    What if I wanted my paddle shifters to be made from goat cheese?

    Jay
     
  5. Ken Chui

    Ken Chui Supporting Actor

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    I think it's a matter of preference, seeing as refinements in other transmissions (e.g. CVT, DCT) offer advantages over a traditional manual setup, particularly with shift times (in milliseconds) and even minimal power loss (handled by clutches instead of a torque converter found in most automatics); in some cases, they're even faster (e.g. the Tiptronic vs. the manual 911 Turbo). As an F1 fan, the idea of paddle shifters in an automobile is more appealing to me than dealing with a notchy gearbox and grinding gears.

    Granted, there are still some kinks to be worked out in their implementation (e.g. untimely gear changes, which could affect acceleration coming out of a corner) and I don't think true manuals will ever disappear, but I think those who do enjoy driving* should have options.

    * soccer moms and SUV drivers excluded [​IMG]
     
  6. KurtEP

    KurtEP Supporting Actor

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    Yeah, it's definitely a matter of preference. For me, paddle might be better technologically in many cases, but I still prefer the feel of a stick. A paddle shifter is like kissing your sister, in my mind. I'd prefer a good automatic to a paddle shifter.

    Choice is key, but it's going to be a rare automobile that's available in all three..
     
  7. BrianW

    BrianW Cinematographer

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    I won't buy a car unless it has a carbon-fiber cigarette lighter.

    I've driven standard transmissions all my adult life, and I don't think I could ever go back to an automatic. But I'd definitely go with a nicely-designed paddle shifter.
     
  8. Steve Schaffer

    Steve Schaffer Producer

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    A well executed paddle shifter may indeed be faster than a stick and clutch, but will definitely be astronimically expensive to diagnose and repair if/when it screws up. I realize that the typical consumer for this type of car isn't going to actually own it (aren't all these exoticars leased these days?) nor is it likely to be kept long enough to ever require a repair.

    I've actually driven a few very well done paddle shifters including the sequential 6 speed on the late Toyota MR-2. Reminded me too much of driving a video game and not a car--no skill involved vs stick and clutch.

    I'd be the first to admit that there are a lot of nasty stick/clutch setups out there, notchy grindy shifters, stiff abrupt clutches, etc. but it's really worth seeking out a good setup--most Hondas, the 1st generation Scion XB, and my Mazda 3 are really excellent examples exceptionally smooth yet precise stick/clutch drivetrains.
     

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