Improving in-wall speakers by............

Discussion in 'Speakers' started by M Anderson, Mar 16, 2012.

  1. M Anderson

    M Anderson Auditioning

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    Good morning, I have Cambridge Soundworks in-wall mc300'S. Do people here think I will gain a significant difference in sound by putting a box in the wall cavity and gluing some sound deading material before inserting the speakers? I have standard 2x6 studs with plaster coated sheet rock on both sides. What I would do is cut 4 strips of wood and insert each strip into the wall (glueing them in place). One on the bottom then the two side and one on the top. Nothing on the back. Or will this create an air tight situation causing the driver to struggle to move?:P
     
  2. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    An air tight situation shouldn't cause the driver to struggle, but it does definitely change the behavior. IMHO, in-walls are designed to work with the cavity in the wall, but likely also expects some insulation in the wall as well. I would say the addition of the cross-bracing probably won't improve the sound to the point that it would be worth the effort.
     
  3. M Anderson

    M Anderson Auditioning

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    Interesting thought. I was going to build a complete box and insert it in the wall. I was going to use expanding foam on the back wall. I see where it would cause the driver to create a suction. Especially in a sealed box. What did you mean by cross bracing? I already have cross bracing two feet above and below where the speaker will be. It is horizontal 2x6's that were part of the wall construction.They go from one stud across to the other creating a natural box. However, The cavity is pretty big, 16" wide by 4 ' high by 7 inches deep. I was going to shrink it down to 12 high 6 wide 6 deep.
     
  4. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    I thought you were going to just use the existing studs and enclose the area where the speaker was going to go, not build a complete box, but the answer is the same IMO. In-wall speakers are designed in such a way that they don't really rely on an enclosure for their response like a typical box speaker would. That's why I say it may not benefit. It may depend on the speaker as well, so I might check with the manufacturer. Generally, enclosing a speaker in a smaller space reduces bass response rather than extending it.
     
  5. M Anderson

    M Anderson Auditioning

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    I appreciate your assistance John Garcia. I conclude with you. The manufacturer designed these for a certain use and anything I do will not enhance the quality but just make it different. In order to tweak them I would need expensive sound equipment and an education in acoustic design. Barring any gross anomalies in my walls construction , my installtion or my set up I will assume my speakers are operating at near peak. My efforts would be large and my returns small and or unknown. I guess bottom line- spending more money gets better quality and even then the returns are diminishing. I will have to trust the company that made my in wall speakers.:(
     

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