If receiver has no hdmi input ----> dvd ?

Discussion in 'Beginners, General Questions' started by ivor84, Mar 30, 2008.

  1. ivor84

    ivor84 Auditioning

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    If I were to get a receiver with no hdmi input and I purchase a dvd player with hdmi output I guess I would have to fall back to using component connection? Or by pass the receiver and plug the dvd player into the TV directly, but end up loosing surround sound. If I had to fall back to using the component connection how would that affect an upconverting dvd player, picture-wise?
     
  2. Robert_J

    Robert_J Lead Actor

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    Why don't you connect the DVD player to the receiver using a digital audio connection. My DVR's are connected to my receiver using optical and digital coax. I get full surround sound.

    -Robert
     
  3. JeremyErwin

    JeremyErwin Producer

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    Connect the dvd's hdmi output to the TV.
    Connect the dvd's optical/or coaxial output to the receiver.
     
  4. ivor84

    ivor84 Auditioning

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    thanks guys
     
  5. Joseph DeMartino

    Joseph DeMartino Lead Actor

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    Might not affect it at all. Depends on which outputs your upconverting player upconverts over (some do both HDMI and component, some do only one or the other) and how good your TV is at scaling inputs by itself. (All LCD, DLP, LCoS and most plasmas sets scale all inputs to their own native resolution anyway, so picture quality often comes down to which does a better job of upconverting - the TV or the DVD player.)

    In my system (JVC LCoS microdisplay, Sony upconverting DVD player, HDMI direct and component via the AV receiver) there is not discernable difference between the upconverted image from the Sony and the TV's own scaler, or between the HDMI and component connections.

    Regards,

    Joe
     
  6. Clark Bradley

    Clark Bradley Stunt Coordinator

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    My problem here is that my DVD sends the audio to both the TV and the AVR. In order to watch a movie, I have to turn the TV audio all the way down (mute produces an icon on the TV).

    With the new AVR's coming out and supporting input from HDMI cables, what are my choices? I'd like to run my DVD HDMI into the AVR then push only the video to the TV (via component I assume).
     
  7. Stephen Tu

    Stephen Tu Screenwriter

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    TVs have menu options to disable the audio. There's no particular reason to ever use the TV speakers, just use your receiver all the time.

    Receivers sometimes have options to disable passing through the audio over HDMI to the TV, but I prefer just turning off the speakers in the TV permanently. My universal remote turns on/off everything automatically.
     
  8. Clark Bradley

    Clark Bradley Stunt Coordinator

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    The DVD player has the option, it just doesn't seem to work. On the DVD side, I've turned off the "Send Audio" but it continues to send it back to the TV via HDMI.

    I would turn off the TV audio, but I use the TV speakers for regular cable programs. I haven't found a way to program the volume off on my LN40A550 with my Logitech Harmony remote, other than mute which produced the image on the screen.
     
  9. Stephen Tu

    Stephen Tu Screenwriter

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    Why? Just connect your TV audio outs or cable box audio outs to your receiver, use your good speakers for everything.
     

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