Blu-ray Review HTF Blu-ray Review: THE GHOST WRITER

Discussion in 'Blu-ray and UHD' started by Michael Reuben, Aug 1, 2010.

  1. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 1998
    Messages:
    21,769
    Likes Received:
    2
    [​IMG]

    The Ghost Writer (Blu-ray)

     

    Studio: Summit Entertainment

    Rated: PG-13

    Film Length: 128 minutes

    Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1

    HD Encoding: 1080p

    HD Codec: AVC

    Audio: English DTS-HD MA 5.1; English DD 5.1 (DVD: English, Spanish DD 5.1)

    Subtitles: English SDH, Spanish (DVD: English SDH, Spanish)

    MSRP: $40.99

    Disc Format: 1 double-sided combo disc (50GB Blu-ray + DVD-9)

    Package: Keepcase

    Theatrical Release Date: Feb. 19, 2010

    Blu-ray Release Date: Aug. 3, 2010

     

     

    Introduction:
     

    A paranoid thriller is a delicate amalgam, especially without overt violence. Instead of giving the audience information (in Hitchcock’s famous formula for suspense), you have to withhold it, so that viewers are never sure what’s happening. At the same time, you have to tell enough of a story to keep people interested and assure them that enough will eventually be revealed to provide a satisfying resolution. It’s a precision balancing act for which most filmmakers (and probably all studio executives) have lost any appetite. That’s why it’s so rare to get a finely crafted work like The Ghost Writer, the latest film from Roman Polanski, who’s an expert in cinematic paranoia, as demonstrated in films like Repulsion, Rosemary’s Baby, Chinatown and The Tenant.

     

    (Author’s note: This review is limited to The Ghost Writer and its presentation on Blu-ray. Anyone wishing to discuss other issues should look elsewhere.)

     

     

    The Feature:

     

    On a wintry day, a ferry from the mainland pulls into Martha’s Vineyard and every car disembarks – all but one. Its driver isn’t aboard. Later his body washes up on the beach.

     

    The body is that of Mike McAra, a long-time aide to former British Prime Minister Adam Lang (Pierce Brosnan). Lang is camped out at the bunker-like home of the head of Rinehart, Inc., a publishing company that has paid a huge advance for Lang’s memoirs. Lang is behind schedule with the manuscript, and McAra was helping with the writing.

     

    McAra’s blood alcohol level was high, and no one knows whether he fell off the ferry or jumped. The people at Rinehart don’t much care either. Their focus is on getting the book finished, and they hire a new “ghost writer” for Lang. He’s played by Ewan McGregor, and since we never learn his name, I’ll call him “GW”. It’s one of the film’s running jokes that, in any interaction where one would expect GW’s name to be used, it’s somehow omitted. (Lang, for example, can’t remember new people’s names and routinely refers to him as “man”.)

     

    GW is hired at a meeting in Rinehart’s London office, where immediately something feels “off”. The book’s editor, Roy (Tim Preece), tells GW he isn’t right for the job, but Maddox, the blustery head of Rinehart (an almost unrecognizable Jim Belushi), says he’s perfect. GW’s agent, Rick (Jon Bernthal), is thrilled with both the opportunity and the fee. Lang’s American attorney, Sidney Kroll (an oily Timothy Hutton), seals the deal with a nod of the head. Then, just as GW is leaving the meeting, Kroll presses a huge manuscript by “another client” into his arms. Take a look, see what you think, he says. GW is perplexed and shortly has good reason to turn down the job, but his agent calls with the financial terms, which are too rich to pass up. The next day he’s en route to Martha’s Vineyard.

     

    After passing through heavy security, GW encounters what can only be described as “an atmosphere”. Lang is hunkered down with his brittle wife Ruth (Dollhouse’s Olivia Williams) and a small staff overseen by the silkily imperious – and aptly named – Amelia Bly (Kim Cattrall). It doesn’t take long to spot the rivalry between Ruth and “that Bly woman”. Lang’s manuscript is maintained under strict security that seems all out of proportion to the vapid tome that GW discovers when he’s allowed to sit down and read it. Is this what all the fuss is about?

     

    The situation intensifies when the former Prime Minister becomes newsworthy again. Charges are leveled that, while in office, he authorized the CIA to torture British citizens suspected of terrorist activities. Spurred by Richard Rycart (John Pugh), a former minister fired from Lang’s government, the International Criminal Court begins proceedings, and the press descends on Martha’s Vineyard.

     

    GW can no longer risk remaining in the otherwise deserted hotel where he’s been staying as the sole off-season guest – and maybe it’s just as well, since he’s already been accosted in the hotel bar by a mysterious man (David Rintoul) asking questions about Lang. He moves in with Lang’s staff, where he’s placed in the room formerly occupied by Mike McAra. There, a chance discovery sets him off on an inquiry that eventually has him retracing McAra’s steps in the hours before he died.

     

    This capsule description barely hints at the entertaining atmosphere of queasy uncertainty that The Ghost Writer manages to sustain. For both GW and the audience, it’s obvious from the start that nefarious dealings are happening all around, but what’s it about? At various points, GW is chased, or maybe not; threatened, or maybe not; seduced, or maybe not; enlisted as a spy, or maybe not. Along the way, he has intriguing encounters with a long-time resident of the Vineyard played by the legendary Eli Wallach and with a Harvard professor (Tom Wilkinson, note-perfect as always) who is certainly more than he seems – but what exactly?

     

    Ewan McGregor holds the film together in what may be his best screen performance to date. He makes GW a credible everyman. A decent enough guy, but no hero, GW keeps thinking (and saying to people) that he should leave, but his curiosity keeps getting the better of him. By the time he begins to grasp even a little of what he’s walked into, it’s too late to get out.

     

    The rest of the cast is equally superb. It’s no secret that the character of Adam Lang was inspired by Tony Blair; the author of the novel, Robert Harris, who also co-wrote the screenplay, has said that his breakthrough came when he heard someone on TV urging that Blair be tried for war crimes. But Pierce Brosnan made the wise choice not to “do” Blair. Instead, he creates his own version of a hugely charismatic and successful politician. The result is a distinctive character reminiscent of many real-world figures. Blair is certainly part of the mix, but, especially for an American viewer, Lang also recalls George W. Bush (the devotion to jogging), Bill Clinton (the bickering with an accomplished spouse), even JFK (the easy manner with the press). When Brosnan’s Lang is on screen, you can’t take your eyes off him, but you also can’t figure him out, just like GW. It’s a brilliant performance.

     

    As the twin moons revolving around Lang, Olivia Williams and Kim Cattrall create vividly contrasting characters, but each accomplishes the interesting trick of keeping her character’s thoughts hidden. Even on repeat viewing, when you know (or think you do) who’s playing whom, it’s often impossible to tell what Ruth Lang and Amelia Bly are up to from moment to moment. It’s a tribute to both actresses that their characters remain interesting even when they’re inscrutable.

     

    What’s true of these performances also applies to the film itself. By the end, GW is able to unravel enough of the riddle so that viewers don’t feel cheated, but not every question gets an answer. After the film ends – with a killer last shot – think back over the events you’ve just witnessed and ask yourself which ones were masterminded from afar and which ones just happened that way. There’s one major episode that people could spend years investigating and debating without ever reaching a clear resolution. As any good conspiracy theorist could tell you, that’s the ultimate proof that the conspirators did their job well.

     

     

    Video:

     

    Summit’s Blu-ray nicely reproduces The Ghost Writer’s cool, wintry pallette. It’s a bleak film set in bleak surroundings, and the Blu-ray’s image provides the appropriate detail, black level and color differentiation to reproduce the carefully composed frames by cinematographer Pawel Edelman. The image is clean, but I did not detect any loss of detail that would suggest excess digital tampering. Nor did I notice any digital artifacts.

     

    In forum discussions, it’s sometimes suggested that Blu-ray’s resolution isn’t necessary for films that don’t involve major action scenes or sweeping vistas. Leaving aside the fact that The Ghost Writer does feature some impressively bleak island landscapes, one of the reasons the film gets under your skin is the careful but subtle arrangement of elements within the frame into compositions that are unsettling, often at a subliminal level. Just to take one example, look at the scene where GW encounters the mysterious stranger at the hotel bar. The stranger doesn’t belong there, and the shot introducing him emphasizes that fact in its angle, lighting and the position of the figure. The stranger almost seems not to be part of the scene. The more completely this kind of detail is presented to your eyes, the more effectively the film works as intended.

     

     

    Audio:

     

    Even for a dialogue-heavy film, the mix on this DTS lossless track is unusually front-oriented. There is very little use of the rear channels, except for a stray sound effect like a seagull or a distant telephone. General ambiance is confined to the front left and right, as is the jittery, insistent score by Alexandre Desplat (which is excellent).

     

    There is nothing wrong with a front-oriented mix. It’s an aesthetic choice that some filmmakers prefer, because they want the viewer’s attention fixed firmly to the screen. One certainly can’t fault the fidelity of the track or the clarity with which it reproduces the dialogue.

     

     

    Special Features:

     

    Warning! All of the special features contain spoilers and should not be viewed until after the film.

     

    The Ghost Writer: Fiction or Reality? (HD) (10:46). An interview with Robert Harris, who wrote the original novel (entitled The Ghost) and co-wrote the screenplay. Harris discusses the origins of the novel and its journey to the screen.

     

    The Cast of “The Ghost Writer” (HD) (11:48). Brief interviews with the principal cast members about working on the film, with Polanski and with each other. This featurette also contains interesting on-set footage that shows, among other things, how the Martha’s Vineyard residence was realized on a soundstage.

     

    An Interview with Roman Polanski (HD) (8:38). Polanski offers observations on the story and the contributions of some of his collaborators, notably cinematographer Pawel Edelman (who also shot The Pianist andOliver Twist). Unfortunately, the interview is too brief.

     

    Trailers. The features menu contains no trailers. At startup the disc plays trailers for Letters to Juliet and RememberMe. These can be skipped with the chapter forward button.

     

     

    In Conclusion:

     

    A truly great paranoid thriller (and there aren’t many) builds its conspiracy out of credible elements that operate in everyday life: greed, flaws in institutions, family conflicts, human frailties. That was the brilliance of Robert Towne’s script for Chinatown, which (with the possible exception of The Pianist) remains Polanski’s greatest film. The Ghost Writer reflects the same level of precision and craftsmanship, but its raw material is the political equivalent of a pulp detective novel, albeit a very good one. If the evildoers in The Ghost Writer were really as effective as the story suggests, the world would be a different place. But there’s no harm in spending two hours as a conspiracy nut, especially when it’s on a grassy knoll populated by such entertaining characters.

     

     

    Equipment used for this review:



    Panasonic BDP-BD50 Blu-ray player (DTS-HD MA decoded internally and output as analog)

    Samsung HL-T7288W DLP display (connected via HDMI)

    Lexicon MC-8 connected via 5.1 passthrough

    Sunfire Cinema Grand amplifier

    Monitor Audio floor-standing fronts and MA FX-2 rears

    Boston Accoustics VR-MC center

    SVS SB12-Plus sub
     
  2. PatW

    PatW Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2003
    Messages:
    1,586
    Likes Received:
    16
    Real Name:
    Patricia
    Great review. I'm excited about this one. Pre-ordered it awhile ago.
     
  3. Andy_G

    Andy_G Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2000
    Messages:
    212
    Likes Received:
    0
    A $40 street price? They're joking, right?
     
  4. David Norman

    David Norman Cinematographer
    Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2001
    Messages:
    2,903
    Likes Received:
    321
    Location:
    Charlotte, NC

    Inconceivable



    Amazon $27 and $23 at Best Buy which makes me suspect an Amazon match soon.
     
  5. PatW

    PatW Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2003
    Messages:
    1,586
    Likes Received:
    16
    Real Name:
    Patricia
    Yeah, I picked this up at amazon.ca for $24. The blurays are always cheaper than the list price.
     
  6. Bryan Tuck

    Bryan Tuck Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2002
    Messages:
    1,701
    Likes Received:
    215
    Real Name:
    Bryan Tuck
    Thanks for the review! This is a really good movie, but it's apparent that at some point during post-production, someone made the decision to aim for a PG-13 rather than an R, as there are quite a few instances where it's distractingly obvious that an F-word in the dialogue has been replaced. Does anyone know if international releases are uncensored?
     
  7. JoeBond

    JoeBond Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2010
    Messages:
    93
    Likes Received:
    3
    I believe it was censored for language in the U.S. since there were too many F words to get a PG-13 but the UK got the movie uncut so hopefully the Blu-ray that will be released over there in September will be region free for those who want it uncut.
     
  8. Bryan Tuck

    Bryan Tuck Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2002
    Messages:
    1,701
    Likes Received:
    215
    Real Name:
    Bryan Tuck

    Thanks; I might look into that. I'm annoyed when anything is censored like that, but they might have gotten away with it if weren't done so poorly. There are moments when it feels like you're watching a late-80s-style network version of the movie.
     
  9. Richard--W

    Richard--W Banned

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2004
    Messages:
    3,527
    Likes Received:
    167
    Well writ and dead on the money, Michael Reuben. I can see that you are perfectly in tune with this exceptional film. And here I though Ghost Writer wasn't showy enough for most critics.



    Richard
     
  10. TonyD

    TonyD Who do we think I am?
    Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 1999
    Messages:
    17,028
    Likes Received:
    356
    Location:
    Disney World and Universal Florida
    Real Name:
    Tony D.
    Watched it over the weekend and I thought the movie was perfect, then I saw the very last scene of the movie.
    I really hated the way this ended.
     
  11. PatW

    PatW Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2003
    Messages:
    1,586
    Likes Received:
    16
    Real Name:
    Patricia
    Joe, the version released in Canada is also uncensored and it's not a flipper.
     
  12. Eric Peterson

    Eric Peterson Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2001
    Messages:
    2,959
    Likes Received:
    1
    Censoring a film for DVD?? WTF??


    I would have likely purchased this DVD, but not now. I will never support censorship....so now it's a rental (at best).


    Really disappointing!!
     
  13. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 1998
    Messages:
    21,769
    Likes Received:
    2

    The film has not been modified for DVD and Blu-ray. This is the version that was released in U.S. theaters with a PG-13 rating.
     
  14. Eric Peterson

    Eric Peterson Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2001
    Messages:
    2,959
    Likes Received:
    1
    Thanks for clearing that up Michael, but I'm not sure it makes me feel much better. That is a really lousy thing to do. Did they really thing that would bring in a few more teenagers?

    I'll still be renting it first before I consider buying what would have been a complete "Blind Buy" for me.
     
  15. Hollywoodaholic

    Hollywoodaholic Edge of Glory?

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2007
    Messages:
    1,817
    Likes Received:
    440
    Location:
    Somewhere in Florida
    Real Name:
    Wayne
    What a nifty, old-fashioned spy thriller. Hitchcock would have been thoroughly impressed (and proud of all the techniques 'borrowed'). The passed note is pure homage to the glass of milk in Notorious. If only it had the Bernard Hermann score that it begs for.


    But this is a master director who just knows how to shoot a well-told story with a compelling, non-stop sense of unease. And a perfect cast. Great stuff. I shudder to think what the Hollywood Studio version of this would be (loud and noisy and jerky and short attention span theatre - in other words, Vantage Point).


    And please folks, separate the art from the artist. If you took away all the music, movies, paintings and books created by assholes, jerks, criminals, misanthropes, misogynists, perverts, addicts, or just damaged egomaniacs, there'd be very little left of any worth. Sometimes it's what they're escaping from (the ugliness of who they really are or how they feel) that drives them so relentlessly toward crafting something beautiful or masterful.
     
  16. David Wilkins

    David Wilkins Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2001
    Messages:
    828
    Likes Received:
    7

    Couldn't agree more. What a stupid thing to do. Why even attempt to present a picture of this nature, as PG-13? Seems to completely lose the focus of the entire effort, and target the wrong audience. Is not "R" a common enough rating?

    I missed this one theatrically, rented the BD last week, and loved it. But I too, will probably hold out for the grown-up version, before purchasing.
     
  17. Hollywoodaholic

    Hollywoodaholic Edge of Glory?

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2007
    Messages:
    1,817
    Likes Received:
    440
    Location:
    Somewhere in Florida
    Real Name:
    Wayne
    If there were indeed nudity and f-bombs excised from this film in order to get a PG-13 rating, it's even more remarkable for the fact that I didn't notice and I don't care. In no way did their absence detract from my enjoyment of this story. Which says a lot for a modern day thriller in today's market.


    Course, if I ever bought this, it would be the import version.
     
  18. Worth

    Worth Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2009
    Messages:
    1,700
    Likes Received:
    612
    Real Name:
    Nick Dobbs
  19. ManW_TheUncool

    ManW_TheUncool Producer

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2001
    Messages:
    5,961
    Likes Received:
    32
    Location:
    The BK
    Real Name:
    ManW
     


    Is it actually identical to (or possibly better than) the US release other than being uncensored *AND* not a flipper (YAY!!!)?

     

    I was just thinking I'll hold out on a purchase (at least until it's really cheap) because it's a flipper -- well, now that I find out the US version was censored (and poorly done as well), that makes passing on the US BD pretty much a no-brainer...

     

    _Man_
     
  20. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 1998
    Messages:
    21,769
    Likes Received:
    2

    Do you mean "poorly done" because it's a flipper, or are you referring to some other aspect of the disc (and, if so, which one)?
     
     

Share This Page