Blu-ray Review HTF Blu-ray Review: METROPOLIS (a/k/a "The Complete Metropolis")

Discussion in 'Blu-ray and UHD' started by Michael Reuben, Dec 15, 2010.

  1. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 1998
    Messages:
    21,763
    Likes Received:
    2

    [​IMG]


    Metropolis (Blu-ray)




    Fritz Lang’s Metropolis has multiple stories. There’s the literal narrative, which is very much a product of its time and can now, at long last, be followed in its entirety (or most of it). There’s the cinematic imagery, which is so original and provocative that it inspired filmmakers even during the many decades when Metropolis itself was chopped and fragmentary; direct descendants include films both major (Star Wars, Blade Runner, The Fifth Element) and minor (e.g., the early Tom Hanks vehicle Joe Versus the Volcano). And then there’s the saga of Metropolis’ creation, loss and gradual recovery, an entirely separate drama with its own colorful cast that no one would believe if a writer dreamed it up.





    Studio: Kino Lorber Films


    Rated: NR


    Film Length: 148 minutes


    Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1


    HD Encoding: 1080p


    HD Codec: AVC


    Audio: DTS-HD MA 5.1; PCM 2.0


    Subtitles: English


    MSRP: $39.95


    Disc Format: 1 50GB


    Package: Keepcase with lenticular slipcover (side-inserted)


    Theatrical Release Date: January 10, 1927 (Berlin)


    Blu-ray Release Date: Nov. 23, 2010





    The Feature:



    Metropolis is a massive city of the future. It towers into the clouds connected by roadways on multiple levels and aircraft in continuous flight. It’s powered by huge machines serviced by thousands of workers who toil and live underground, working back-breaking ten-hour shifts. The wealthy and privileged live in light and air above. The master of Metropolis is Joh Fredersen (Alfred Abel), whose office occupies the top of the New Tower of Babel, the city’s tallest skyscraper.



    The sons of the wealthy enjoy a recreational area called the Eternal Gardens, which is a sort of cross between a 19th Century theme park and a high-end brothel. One day, as Fredersen’s only son, Freder (Gustav Fröhlich), is passing time in the Eternal Gardens, he encounters a beautiful intruder: Maria (Brigitte Helm), a poor girl, who has brought a group of children to see how the other half lives. Maria and her charges are quickly escorted out, but Freder is entranced. He follows her to the world below, where he find himself in one of the machine rooms. There he witnesses an industrial accident, as the so-called “M-Machine” explodes, killing many workers. (The scene is famous for Freder’s vision of the M-Machine as Moloch, God of Fire, consuming workers in a ritual sacrifice.) Appalled, Freder rushes to his father’s office to report what he’s seen.





    Fredersen listens to his son’s report, but he has concerns other than dead workers. First of all, he’s incensed that he’s receiving the news from his son rather than his chief assistant, Josaphat (Theodor Loos), whom he fires on the spot. (Josaphat, knowing that he will now have to join the work force and labor underground, becomes suicidal with despair, but Freder persuades him to take heart, and they agree to meet later at Josaphat’s home.) Second, Fredersen is concerned that his son ventured into the lower depths, and he orders a henchman known as “The Thin Man” (Fritz Rasp) to watch Freder’s every move from now on. And finally, Fredersen is concerned when Grot (Heinrich George), foreman of the Heart Machine, the energy source for Metropolis, brings him diagrams found on the dead workers; similar documents have been turning up elsewhere, and Fredersen suspects a conspiracy.





    Father and son now begin to follow separate paths that will intersect with dire consequences. Fredersen visits a scientist named Rotwang (Rudolf Klein-Rogge) in an antique house in a lower level of the city. Their relationship is complicated. They are old collaborators, and Rotwang’s work has clearly benefitted Fredersen. But they were also romantic rivals for the love of a woman named Hel, who chose the wealthy businessman and died giving birth to Freder. Rotwang has carried a torch all these years, and Fredersen discovers a massive memorial to Hel in Rotwang’s home. Rotwang is furious, but brags to Fredersen that he’s on the verge of his greatest breakthrough: the creation of an entirely mechanical being. Rotwang shows Fredersen the robot, which already moves and responds to commands. (It is probably the film’s single most famous image and an obvious progenitor of C3PO.) Rotwang boasts that shortly the robot will be indistinguishable from a human being.





    Having shown his project to Fredersen, Rotwang studies the documents found on the dead workers and identifies them as maps of the ancient catacombs below the city. He leads Fredersen through tunnels to the location identified on the maps, where, unobserved, they witness a meeting of workers. The meeting is addressed by none other than Maria, the young woman who captured Freder’s attention. She preaches about the original Tower of Babel, then tells the workers to be patient, because a “mediator” is coming, who will establish communication, and thereby make peace, between the “head” that rules above ground and the “hands” that work below.





    When the meeting concludes, Fredersen instructs Rotwang to give his robot Maria’s form. He wants to use the robot to sabotage the workers’ movement. Rotwang agrees, but he has his own agenda. He’s noticed something in the crowd that Fredersen overlooked: his son, Freder, dressed as a worker.





    After leaving his father’s office, Freder returned underground and exchanged places and clothes with worker No. 11811, whose name is Georgy (Erwin Biswanger). The Thin Man mistook Georgy for Freder and followed him to the wild nightlife of Yoshiwara, where Georgy strayed after discovering wads of cash in the pockets of Freder’s clothing. Meanwhile, Freder remained at Georgy’s post, tasting firsthand the harsh life governed by the rigors of the ten-hour clock and service to the machines. After the shift change, fellow workers brought Freder to the meeting in the catacombs to hear Maria speak. Freder is overcome with love and devotion, and when Maria sees him, she decides that Freder is the long-awaited mediator. They embrace and agree to meet the next day. But Rotwang is waiting in the shadows. He abducts Maria so that he can give her form to his robot. He plans to instruct the robot to destroy Fredersen’s great city and kill his son.





    For the remainder of the film, the plans of the four principals – Freder, Maria, Fredersen and Rotwang – work themselves out in conflict with each other, leading to a near cataclysm that almost destroys Metropolis. The latter half of the film relies on sophisticated cross-cutting among subplots, and this was one aspect that suffered severely when the film lost significant sequences that both set up the individual plots and are crucial to the story’s dramatic rhythms. The film begins and ends with the famous epigram written by Lang’s wife and scriptwriter, Thea von Harbou: “The mediator between head and hands must be the heart!” At the time of the film’s release, Lang claimed he didn’t take the sentiment seriously, but late in life he acknowledged that perhaps he should have, because fans of the film continued to comment favorably on precisely that element. (Ironically, Harbou’s “heart” would lead her to join the Nazis, after divorcing Lang.)





    A notable (and influential) aspect of Metropolis is its fusion of old and new. The characters may live in a city of the future, but they worship in a cathedral whose iconography could not be more medieval. A monk warns of the coming apocalypse, and statues personify death surrounded by the seven deadly sins depicted in minute detail. (These will later come to life for Freder in a terrifying hallucination.) When Rotwang attempts to flee with the real Maria in tow, he does so in a way that unmistakably evokes Lon Chaney’s Hunchback of Notre Dame, complete with ringing bell. Ever since Metropolis, filmmakers have worked variations on this formula to ground their future visions in something recognizable. (Think, for example, of the priestly garments in which Ridley Scott dressed Dr. Tyrell.)





    The film is also very much of its time, eerily so. In another of its famous images, row after row of exhausted and identically clothed workers march in lock step out of the elevator from the factory, while a fresh group marches past them, also in lock step, to begin the next shift. When the gate slams shut, it is impossible not to be reminded of the concentration camps that would be constructed little more than a decade later. It’s not by accident (though for all the wrong reasons) that Hitler admired Metropolis and asked Lang to be the official filmmaker for the Third Reich. Lang declined and fled to Paris and ultimately to America.





    Metropolis was released in January 1927, after significant shooting delays and cost overruns. In that sense, Lang was the James Cameron of his day, but Metropolis didn’t have the happy ending of Titanic or Avatar. Neither critics nor viewers were enthusiastic, and the German studio, UFA, withdrew the film after four months. That was the last time anyone saw Lang’s original 153-minute cut (or so it was thought at the time).





    UFA’s American distribution partner, Paramount, hired a now-forgotten playwright, Channing Pollock, to rescript the film using the existing footage. The result ran just over 90 minutes, and all three negatives of Metropolis (one at Paramount and two at UFA) were cut to conform to Pollock’s new script. The trims were discarded. As far as everyone knew, Lang’s version was gone. The Pollock version – or, as it came to be known, the “Paramount negative”– became the standard version of Metropolis.





    In 1984, film composer Giorgio Moroder released a re-cut 87-minute version of the film. Moroder re-edited various scenes, tinted sequences with vivid washes of color and rescored the entire film with pop singers and synthesizers. I remember seeing that version in a theater. It was great to see some of Metropolis’ signature images on a big screen in 35mm (as opposed to the washed-out class room presentations I’d seen earlier in 16mm), but the whole enterprise felt . . . wrong.





    For the film’s 75th anniversary in 2002, the Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau Foundation undertook a four-year project to reconstruct the film digitally using the Paramount negative and all other available sources. The result ran 123 minutes and used text inserts (sometimes accompanied by still images) to describe sequences that were still missing. I saw that version at Film Forum in New York City, and it was like seeing the film for the first time. Kino released that version on DVD and was preparing it for release on Blu-ray, when the unimaginable happened – a copy of a near-complete version suddenly appeared.





    An Argentinian distributor had been among those to see Lang’s original cut in 1927. He liked what he saw and bought a copy to bring back to his native land. After passing through various hands, that copy ended up in a government archive. Unfortunately, the archive had neither the facilities nor the funds for safe storage of highly flammable nitrate stock. At some point in the 1970s, all such sources were transferred to 16mm: poorly, amateurishly and with severe cropping. But in 2008, the curator of the Museo del Cine in Buenos Aires announced that she had located this version of Metropolis, and that it contained numerous sequences long thought to be permanently lost.





    As has already been widely reported, the title of this Blu-ray, The Complete Metropolis, is a misnomer, because the film isn’t quite “complete”. There are two short sequences that could not be recovered from the Buenos Aires master. And viewers should be prepared, because the 25 minutes of footage that were recovered are of such poor quality that the chief restorationist for the 2002 version pronounced them the worst pieces of film he’d ever encountered. Still, the discovery of the Buenos Aires master filled major gaps in the story and, perhaps more importantly, definitively resolved questions about the order of shots and the choice of edits. Despite considerable variance in quality, even after digital restoration, and the obvious cropping of the Buenos Aires footage, Metropolis now exists in a form that is far closer to complete than anyone could ever have hoped.








    Video:





    It is difficult to offer a uniform evaluation of the Blu-ray image, because there are so many different sources. Even the footage from the 2002 restoration shows numerous variations, even within scenes. However, using the earlier Kino DVD as a comparison for those elements it shares with the Blu-ray, the increase in clarity and resolution is immediately obvious. Images on the Blu-ray gain a sense of depth and perspective that the DVD simply cannot match, and these are essential for Lang’s spacious compositions. The Blu-ray appears to be brighter than the DVD, but I don’t think this indicates a difference in black levels so much as the ability of Blu-ray to better distinguish between different shades of gray and therefore provide a superior rendering of the interplay of light and shadow. Details of sets, costume and performances are all much easier to see and appreciate on the Blu-ray.





    Wherever the material from the Buenos Aires master has been cut in, the report is less favorable. There’s no dancing around the point – the footage looks awful. At best, it’s soft and blurry. At worst, it’s soft, blurry and appears to have a smeary coat of grease. Black bars at the top, left and right indicate where image was cropped in the transfer to 16mm, and it is often obvious that relevant picture information is missing. Still, there is enough on display to complete the narrative, restore the editing rhythms and allow the alternating storylines to unfold as Lang intended.





    The disc does not contain a detailed list of the newly added footage, but one can be found at Kino’s website. By way of example, the following is an image from a newly restored scene featuring The Thin Man:




    [​IMG]





    Audio:





    The original 1927 score by Gottfried Huppertz has been newly recorded for this edition, and it sounds terrific in DTS lossless. Huppertz’ scoring notes were an invaluable aid to the 2002 restoration efforts, and they indicate the care with which the composer matched his music cues to the action on screen. The score has been recorded at a level that complements but never overwhelms the images, and it’s a pleasure to hear. For two-channel purists, there is a PCM stereo track.








    Special Features:





    The special features are unique to this Blu-ray edition. Not included are any of the special features from the 2002 version DVD. This is unfortunate, because at least the restoration featurette remains relevant to a full understanding of how this “complete” version of the film came to exist. The work that preceded the 2008 discovery of the Buenos Aires master is essential to the quality of the current version of Metropolis, and it deserves greater attention than it receives on this disc.





    “Voyage to Metropolis (HD) (54:42). This comprehensive documentary traces the history of the film from its conception and production through its most recent restoration. The only significant gap is the 2002 restoration. It’s an informative and entertaining work, but it’s hardly exhaustive. The 2002 version DVD featured a separate documentary containing significant material that is not included here.





    Interview with Paula Felix-Didier of the Museo del Cine, Buenos Aires (SD; 1.78:1, enhanced for 16:9) (9:31). In the “Voyage” documentary, Felix-Didier speaks in Spanish, but here she speaks in English, providing a detailed account of the history of the Buenos Aires version and its discovery. She was interviewed in May 2010.





    Trailer (HD) (2:01). The trailer is for the restoration.








    In Conclusion:





    I’ve seen Metropolis many times, but I’ve only seen this version once, and I no longer feel like I know the film well. Even after watching the 2002 version, where the missing material was described in text, having it play on screen is a different experience. Lang’s elaborate cross-cutting makes each storyline resonate within the others, and they play off each other in unexpected ways. It’ll take time to reevaluate and reabsorb this complex and original work. It’s almost like getting a new film – and a great one.











    Equipment used for this review:





    Panasonic BDP-BD50 Blu-ray player (DTS-HD MA decoded internally and output as analog)


    Samsung HL-T7288W DLP display (connected via HDMI)


    Lexicon MC-8 connected via 5.1 passthrough


    Sunfire Cinema Grand amplifier


    Monitor Audio floor-standing fronts and MA FX-2 rears


    Boston Accoustics VR-MC center


    SVS SB12-Plus sub
     
  2. Cees Alons

    Cees Alons Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 1997
    Messages:
    19,316
    Likes Received:
    289
    Real Name:
    Cees Alons
    Thanks, Michael. That sounds promising!


    I chose the Amazon/UK tin version (Masters of Cinema), and haven't even opened it yet. It must be exactly the same version, I trust (although it says 150 mins. on the back).

    I postponed seeing it until the holidays, to make sure I have ample time to give it more than a usual view. Too bad the restored parts are in that terrible shape, but from your review I already look forward to see a whole new film.


    When I had my HT constructed, and chose a touch of Art Deco, it was only natural to use a poster of Metroplis there. That famous poster, you already referred to it, with the high-towering buildings, the face and the letter font has become an Art Deco icon, almost unconnected to the film.


    It's a pity of course that Lang never lived to see these parts found again. The documentary Die Reise nach Metropolis is in the box as well. Does the Kino Lorber box also contain the "56-page booklet"?



    Cees
     
  3. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 1998
    Messages:
    21,763
    Likes Received:
    2
    No, no booklet. Whether because of cost or rights issues (or both), the Kino edition is much lighter on extras than the Masters of Cinema edition. However, it's my understanding that the MOC edition is region-locked.
     
  4. Cees Alons

    Cees Alons Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 1997
    Messages:
    19,316
    Likes Received:
    289
    Real Name:
    Cees Alons
    Yes it's region B (and the DVD region 2). At least, that's what it says on the back of the tin (my solution to the region problem is: having two of the same brand BD-players, one imported; probably the least expensive solution by far as well, and the remotes are the same.).


    The 56-page booklet is "featuring an archival article by Fritz Lang; a 1927 review by Luis Buñuel; articles by Jonathan Rosenbaum and Karen Naundorf; and restoration notes by Martin Koerber". I don't see an interview with Paula Felix-Didier mentioned, but there's a full-length audio commentary by David Kalat and Jonathan Rosenbaum. I'm now trying to remember if I saw/heard any of those on one of the previous DVDs - I don't think so, but I cannot be totally sure. (I often skip listening to audio-commentaries.)


    My (humble) congratulations with the wealth of information in your review! Not many reviews are of this level!



    Cees
     
  5. Russell G

    Russell G Fake Shemp
    Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2002
    Messages:
    11,216
    Likes Received:
    571
    Location:
    Deadmonton
    Real Name:
    Russell
    I spun this one a a couple of weeks ago, it was my first time viewing a "Complete" version of the film since seeing Morodors version whenever it showed up on VHS (it might of been a TV airing actually). This one though knocked my socks off. I found the story telling and images so powerful that soon I stopped noticing the switches in quality and just got wrapped up in the experience. This is definitely one of my favorites for the year, I'm probably going to give it a re-watch over Christmas break. Great job on the thorough review, I'd only add the suggestion of cranking the sound up. I played it loud and some of the scenes felt like a face punch, awesome stuff! :)
     
  6. Brianruns10

    Brianruns10 Second Unit

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2008
    Messages:
    276
    Likes Received:
    1
    I won't be buying this blu-ray, because I regard it as a rush job, and a holiday cash-in. If there ever was a movie that warranted the kind of comprehensive treatment given Bladerunner, Mr. Arkadin or Dawn of the Dead, it is this film. And considering that Metropolis is one of the most influential films PERIOD, it deserves far more than two featurettes, which are missing important parts of the story. None of the features of the DVD have been transferred over...no stills galleries, nor even a commentary. Sheesh, the European version had a commentary (with an American no less), and Kino couldn't even manage one of their own (or license the MoC track).

    I plan on holding out for a proper release, one that has the comprehensive restoration and the American cut (this cut is VITALLY important, both to truly understand how it was butchered, and because it remains the version of the film best known and widely seen). I'd also like to see the Argentine version entire (which was apparently derived from a different negative, and has many different angles and takes)...it is of poor quality, so I think an SD-DVD would suffice. In a perfect world, I think the Moroder version would also be worthy of inclusion (though this is a long shot due to the music rights issues). And then, another disc with bonus content: making of documentaries, stills galleries, promotional art, impact statements.

    Really, this film needs to be wrested from the hands of Kino (who usually do admirable jobs such as on the new releases of The Black Pirate, and Steamboat Bill), and put to someone who'd do it right, like Criterion.
     
  7. TravisR

    TravisR Studio Mogul

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2004
    Messages:
    26,631
    Likes Received:
    3,802
    Location:
    The basement of the FBI building


    While I'm sure everyone would like to see at least the existing special features carried over, isn't the movie and its presentation the most important thing?
     
  8. Michael Elliott

    Michael Elliott Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2003
    Messages:
    7,421
    Likes Received:
    185
    Location:
    KY
    Real Name:
    Michael Elliott
    Excellent review.

    Does anyone know if the "Voyage to Metropolis" is the same documentary that was shown on TCM a few weeks back under the title Metropolis Refound? I thought that documentary was nearly as entertaining and intense as the film itself. It really makes you wonder how many other lost films are out there in some vault just waiting to be found.
     
  9. urbo73

    urbo73 Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    May 12, 2009
    Messages:
    126
    Likes Received:
    0
    I bought this when it came out and am happy with it. The MOC R2 version seems superior since it has the original German intertitle cards (with optional English subtitles), where the Kino version has new cards translated. The former is the better way to preserve the film, but I am in R1 and w/o a region free player. If I had a choice and region free player, I'd go with the MOC version. More faithful.
     
  10. ManW_TheUncool

    ManW_TheUncool Producer

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2001
    Messages:
    5,979
    Likes Received:
    33
    Location:
    The BK
    Real Name:
    ManW
    I need to finally get to this great classic during my holiday "vacation". I've only ever seen tiny bits of it shown here or there completely out of context -- and of course, heard/read more than enough references to it -- so this will be my first real experience of it in any form. Hopefully, the jarring diffs in PQ won't be any real distraction for me.


    It's too bad though that we didn't get a truly "complete" release on BD from Kino (like that MoC version in the UK). Maybe Criterion can get to it some day...


    And thanks for yet another solid review, Michael...


    _Man_
     
  11. DaveF

    DaveF Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2001
    Messages:
    17,493
    Likes Received:
    1,382
    Location:
    One Loudoun, Ashburn, VA
    Real Name:
    David Fischer
    Fascinating. I've got one of the various DVD copies that got put out in 2000-something. It looks pretty bad. A $5 bargain bin purchase I think. I watched it once, felt I'd done my cinematic duty in seeing the historic film, but had no desire to watch again, the DVD is so terrible.


    This is intriguing, though, a reasonable restoration, hopefully better still looking on BR than a DVD. And completely revamped score. I'm not going to rush out and buy this. But I'll keep it in mind should the mood strike.
     
  12. Parker Clack

    Parker Clack Schizophrenic Man
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 1997
    Messages:
    12,214
    Likes Received:
    58
    Location:
    Kansas City, MO
    Real Name:
    Parker
    Excellent review Michael. I may be picking this up at some point. Now I just have to find the time to be able to give it the time needed to give it justice on my end.
     
  13. Charles Smith

    Charles Smith Extremely Talented Member
    Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2007
    Messages:
    5,210
    Likes Received:
    1,172
    Location:
    Nor'east
    Real Name:
    Charles Smith
    Yes, the film is the important thing, but I go for complete packages on certain things and it's the MofC release for me. I can wait till I have all-region capability to watch it. I am really tired of nice presentations being available on UK or other releases and relatively bare-bones ones being doled out to us. Seems like there's been a run of this lately, but I'm also checking more thoroughly than I used to.
     
  14. Brianruns10

    Brianruns10 Second Unit

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2008
    Messages:
    276
    Likes Received:
    1
    Yes, the film is the important thing, but its a matter of proper treatment and respect for the film. I've refused to buy "The Best Years of Our Lives," despite it being in my top ten favorite films, because the existing DVD is utterly barebones, and I'd rather wait for a proper release with at least a commentary.

    I'm not buying Kino's Metropolis because, given the context in which it was released, I believe it is a cynical holiday cash in. In terms of special features, their previous DVD is far better, and given the outstanding work Kino has done on other releases this year (including The Black Pirate, Steamboat Bill and Sherlock Jr.) it is inexplicable why their release of one of the MOST IMPORTANT FILMS OF ALL TIME is released with only a documentary and short interview to cover its rich, complex history. And given that MoC released a BETTER package BEFORE Kino did just further's my belief that they cut corners.

    As I've said, this film demands a multi-version release, at least, the inclusion of the American cut, which is arguably the most influential version of them all, since it was this version that was public domain, which was the only version available. Yes, the new restoration is the most complete, but in terms of history and impact, it is the least resonant by the very fact that it was largely unavailable.

    And when it comes down to it, I've seen Metropolis enough, including the new version several times, that I am content to wait until a proper release of this film is crafted....ideally if a company better suited to the challenge, like Criterion could manage the rights.
     
  15. Adam Gregorich

    Owner

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 1999
    Messages:
    15,691
    Likes Received:
    676
    Location:
    The Other Washington
    Real Name:
    Adam
    Wow. Outstanding review. Thanks Michael. I have never seen this an look forward to seeing it for the first time. Like Dave F I picked up the Madacy (?) $5 bargin release, but never watched it. I'm glad I waited.
     
  16. urbo73

    urbo73 Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    May 12, 2009
    Messages:
    126
    Likes Received:
    0
    I find these type of things sort of depressing. Life is too short to hold out for something that may never be - especially having one of your favorite films in the best possible format. How long do you want to wait for a new realease of TBYOOL? Another decade? If so, then suppose it's not that much of a favorite film after all. I don't get this logic. Statements aren't being made. Your loss IMHO.



     
  17. David_B_K

    David_B_K Advanced Member

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2006
    Messages:
    1,951
    Likes Received:
    392
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    Real Name:
    David

    I remember when the most recent DVD version of Welles' Touch of Evil was released a year ot two ago. There were quite a few "I'll wait for the Blu-ray posts". That's long time to miss a great presentation for something that has yet to materialize.
     
  18. Scott Calvert

    Scott Calvert Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 1998
    Messages:
    885
    Likes Received:
    2
    It seems no one can have a negative opinion around here without this guy jumping in with comments like this. So you're willing to settle for less? Fine. But please lay off those of us who want something better and are making our opinions heard. I don't think anyone really cares about what you find depressing.




     
  19. urbo73

    urbo73 Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    May 12, 2009
    Messages:
    126
    Likes Received:
    0
    Yeah, sorry to spoil the negativity....I'm willing to settle for owning my favorite films in the best possible format at the time. Do I wish sometimes things were better? Sure. Case in point being this release of Metropolis as I said in my first post in this thread. But not at the expense of not owning something I love. How can not owning something you really like be more than "less"?? Can you believe there are people that actually enjoy watching their favorite films rather than whine all day about this and that? This forum is not just for whining..Nothing is ever perfect, and one can do what he or she likes, but if you keep waiting for perfection, you'll be a sorry camper.

     
  20. JohnMor

    JohnMor Producer
    Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2004
    Messages:
    4,065
    Likes Received:
    1,296
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    Real Name:
    John Moreland



    Amen, Ryan! My sentiments exactly. Life is way too short.
     

Share This Page