How to attach cloth to plastic removable grille covers?

Discussion in 'Speakers' started by zane, Jun 10, 2006.

  1. zane

    zane Stunt Coordinator

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    I have some Creative Soundworks Tower 2's that are 3 years old and my cats have really trashed the cloth. I think I'll try either Radio Shacks fabric or parts express. Most threads I found referred to wood or MDF grills but mine are plastic and kinda pop into place. Is contact cement my best bet. Does it come in a jar with a brush?
     
  2. Geoff Gunnell

    Geoff Gunnell Stunt Coordinator

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    Since the cloth should be tensioned, I'd use something with greater ultimate hold like epoxy.

    You'll need some spring clamps -- clothespins might work -- clamp the fabric in place, then glue it down between the clamps. Then after it dries you can glue it under where the clamps were. The hard part is to get an even stretch with no wrinkles or puckers [​IMG]
     
  3. Todd Stout

    Todd Stout Screenwriter

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  4. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    Good site, Todd! Don’t see many people familiar with Huw Powell’s speakers. We’re using them in our home theater.

    Back to the topic, I’ve found it’s much easier if you have a glue that sets pretty fast. I’ve used a hot glue gun. Run a bead down one length and pull the cloth over immediately. It’ll set in a minute or less. Then run a bead down the opposite length, and stretch and wrap the cloth around, and hold it until the glue sets. Repeat for the other two sides, and trim the cloth as shown in the link.

    Which every way you go, I think the trick is to use a glue that tacks rather quickly. It isn’t hard to find them these days. What you don’t want is a slow curing glue, that you have to sit there and hold everything in place for a half hour or so!

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  5. zane

    zane Stunt Coordinator

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    The hot glue method sounds good. Do you have problems with the corners looking right when you do the sides one at a time instead of doing the corners like the above site shows?
     
  6. GregBe

    GregBe Second Unit

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    Have you tried calling CSW? Although they are discontinued products, there is a chance they may have extra grills they would be willing to sell to you cheap.
     
  7. zane

    zane Stunt Coordinator

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    I called yesterday, they want $20 shipped for the large grille and $11 shipped for the small lower grille. I'll probably try to redo them myself but its nice to know they still sell them in case I'm not happy with the job I do myself.
     
  8. douglas-b

    douglas-b Stunt Coordinator

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    I just went to Walmart and got some spay on adhesive. The trick is to spray the grill and let it set for at least a minute to get tacky. If you have problem spots you can pull it up and work it around and it will still be pliable and sticky. I had to do mine twice...so have enough material to try it twice. It turned out great and it was the first time I'd ever done it.
     
  9. DaveHo

    DaveHo Supporting Actor

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    I've used a hot melt glue gun in the past. Really wasn't that hard to get it wrinkle free. The back looked a little sloppy, but that's not visible when mounted to the speaker.

    -Dave
     

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