HDMI, RBGHV and Resolution

Discussion in 'Beginners, General Questions' started by DKMW, Apr 17, 2009.

  1. DKMW

    DKMW Auditioning

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    I have a new apartment pre-wired for a home theater with in wall speakers in the living room with the components to be in a closet in an adjacent room. The company that did the wiring used RGBHV to the TV saying that the analog wire does transmit/support 1080p. Another company said the wiring should have been HDMI and I will only get 480p from a Blu ray with this set up. They both can't be right. And if the latter is true, then why even get a Blu Ray.

    So...what resolution will I get on 1080p panel wired with RGBHV to an AV receiver with video from Blu Ray?

    Thanks a bundle.

    D.
     
  2. Max Leung

    Max Leung Producer

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    I don't think you can get 1080p over RGBHV out of ANY blu-ray player. They only put out component video using 1080i.

    If you use a PC with a Blu-ray player + software you can probably do it.

    The wiring should have been HDMI in the first place. [​IMG]
     
  3. JohnRice

    JohnRice Lead Actor

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    I may be wrong, but I believe they are both right, though the first ones are misleading. RGB can support 1080P, or at least 1080i, but hardly anything will output it that way. HDMI would have been the way to go. Plus, by using analog cables, you are degrading the image by going digital (source) to analog (cables) and back to digital (presuming an LCD, DLP or Plasma monitor). I'm sure the installers sleep at night knowing what they said was technically true, if dishonest and incomplete.
     
  4. Leo Kerr

    Leo Kerr Screenwriter

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    RGBHV, over decent cable, can push far more than 1920x1080P. There are the issues of the D/A->A/D, and then, of course, the whole Digital Rights Management issues that pretty much forbid "high quality" analog signals.
     
  5. DKMW

    DKMW Auditioning

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    Thanks for your answers. Gives me just a little more clarity on where to go from here. Leo said it can transmit 1080P. John too (great quote by the way). But what did you mean "hardly anything will output it that way"?

    What's the issue with digital rights that Leo mentioned? Is it the case that I will or will not be able to watch Blu rays in 1080P because of copyright protection?

    I really do appreciate the input. Looking forward to more.

    Dan
     
  6. Leo Kerr

    Leo Kerr Screenwriter

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    There is a grave fear in the Content Producer's corporate minds that if there is an unencrypted, high quality analog signal, people will record it and pirate it.

    This is, perhaps, true.

    On the other hand, it's not that hard to break/bypass the HDCP content protection that travels over the DVI and HDMI connections and get the unencrypted, unprotected digital bit-stream, too. But at least that takes effort.

    So, many manufacturers, under pressure from the Movie Industry, make players that limit themselves, artificially. Some limit BD playout to 1080i, instead of 1080p. Many upscaling player makers sort of use this as an excuse to not add another D/A stage, so that any upconvert beyond 480p is only via DVI/HDMI. This allows for less expensive D/A converters.

    But in the grand scheme of things, if you can do a direct digital display path, from your disc, to the player, to the monitor, to the actual transistors that drive the individual pixels, then you can potentially get a much cleaner signal.

    It's unfortunate, however, that they picked something as fragile as the current HDMI physical specification. Connectors can only be wired up by machine. There are about 30 wires in that little connector, and as a whole, the cable is pretty close to its specified bandwidth, so that if there's a flaw, too tight a radius, or your cat started chewing on it, then you're getting close to catastrophic payload failures -- generally represented by the screen going dark.

    Leo
     
  7. DKMW

    DKMW Auditioning

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    Thanks for your answer, Max and Leo and John too. So, here's a really simplistic question that will totally show my hand as someone without too much of a clue and a demonstration of why only a little knowledge is a dangerous thing (as if this whole thread doesn't do that already)

    If the Blu ray is connected to the receiver with an HDMI connection, wouldn't it send 1080p content to that receiver; and then the receiver would pass it on to the TV across the (supposed 1080p supporting) RBGHV cable?

    Trying to wrap my head around this. You guys ARE helping. Thanks.

    D.
     
  8. Max Leung

    Max Leung Producer

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    I don't think a receiver that converts HDMI signals to analog RGBHV exists.

    And if it did exist, it would not allow copy-protected (HDCP) signals to be converted to analog anyways.
     
  9. DKMW

    DKMW Auditioning

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    Well, the guy says its gonna be 1080p. I have it in writing. Is there a calibration test of some sort to prove he's delivering what he says if I choose his company to hook it up?

    D.
     
  10. Leo Kerr

    Leo Kerr Screenwriter

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    One thing is many TVs will tell you what THEY think the incoming signal is.
     
  11. joe277

    joe277 Extra

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    Component can send a 1080p signal over a certain distance. Your TV has to be able to accept the 1080p signal through component inputs and your source needs to be able to send out a 1080p signal over component. Otherwise you're just getting a scaled or converted signal and not a true 1080p signal. The easiest way to see 1080p on your TV would be to purchase a good scaler and stick it behind the TV to scale your component signal to a 1080p HDMI signal.

    The chances are your TV cannot accept a 1080p signal over component, and the only common pieces of equipment that output the proper signal over component cables are the Playstation 3 and xBox 360, but only for video games, NOT DVDs or Blu-rays.

    You can get HD over the component cables, and except for Blu-ray, you won't notice any quality difference unless you have a TV larger than 50" or so. And even then, you may not even notice the difference.
     

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