Front Projector Connections, and pre-wiring them.

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by Tom Kay, Nov 24, 2003.

  1. Tom Kay

    Tom Kay Stunt Coordinator

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    Hi Folks:

    I've asked some questions lately about future-proofing my HT as I build it. Especially wire and cable runs.

    I'd like to focus solely on the front projector (an item I am still not convinced I'll ever buy, but who knows).

    I have been told to run 3 RG6 cables (quad shield) to it, for the component inputs, plus another RG6 for a composite input, much like the basic TV cable. Also, someone had suggested an S-Video cable, but I might skip this, as it's going to have to be custom made-to-length, and I assume I only use S-Video with a VCR. I'm going to avoid VCRs as much as possible in the coming years, but if I need to watch it from the projector, I'll still have the composite cable, right?

    What about control? Is this typically accomplished with a remote, aimed at the projector?

    Are there other cables that should go from the equipment rack to the projector? I'll wire in a 110VAC outlet on the ceiling, so that's already planned.

    Am I missing anything else, with regard to the front projector? Thanks and please speak up if I am.

    Cheers, Tom.
     
  2. Neil Joseph

    Neil Joseph Lead Actor

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    There may be possibly a 12V trigger from the projector to the screen area if you ever decide you need a motorized screen. An alternative to the RG6 is a mini bnc cable that is basically 5 composite cables bundled together with BNC ends. It is good for HDef, or for component you would use 3 cables out of the five with 2 spares for composite if you wish. If I were were pre-wiring for a future projector today (just my opinion), I would wire a DVI connection as well.
     
  3. Ronald.H

    Ronald.H Agent

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    I ran a cable to the projector for an IR blaster, but never hooked it up. I've found it's just as easy to just point the remote at the projector.

    I purchased a 30 foot Wire World cable. It's S-Video and component all in one cable. It made it easy to pre-wire.
     
  4. RAF

    RAF Lead Actor

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    The only way to "future proof" your FP installation (at least to some extent) is to concentrate on running empty conduit from your components site to an area just behind the ceiling location for your FP. That's what I did back in 1999 when I built my HT. That way, you can snake through any cables that you need as you need them. Also remember to provide an outlet or two for the projector itself.

    There is also the question of placement of the FP. This depends on the type and the throw distance of the lens. Back in 1999 I wasn't sure whether I'd be getting a digital projector or a CRT projector. CRT FP's traditionally have short throw distances compared to LCD, D-ILA and now DLP among others. My solution was to provide wire paths and power to TWO locations. Even though I don't use the "forward" one (I had LCD and now a DLP projector) it's there if need be.

    What would I do different if I did it today? I'd make the tubing a bit bigger, if possible. I used about 1.5" diameter tubing and things get a little tight with all the cabling. In fact I had to wire the second component set (my projector has a lot of inputs) outside the tubing. And DVI wasn't even in the picture (no pun intended) in the 1999 HT! But the downside is that as the tubing gets larger it gets harder to install in some areas.
     
  5. Ronald.H

    Ronald.H Agent

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    I agree with Robert. I also ran conduit to my projector. My problem is that I had to run the conduit perpendicular to my joists, meaning I had to drill through every joist. (no fun at all!!)

    I may have bitten myself my using smaller conduit (1 inch, I think). If I ever run DVI, I'll be screwed unless I can run the cable through and then put the ends on.

    Bottom line - the conduit idea is the best solution to allow for future cable runs.
     
  6. Neil Joseph

    Neil Joseph Lead Actor

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    I also used a 1.5" conduit and would use a 2" one if done today. [​IMG] I installed my conduit while they were building my home with minimal tools and also had to drill through some joists. All I had was a power drill and an attachment to drill large holes.
     
  7. Dan_Morez

    Dan_Morez Agent

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    Neil, did you have to strengthen your joist after drilling thru them? steel clips or anything? I'm also thinking about doing the same thing, but am scared of weakening them to much....think I might go thru the soffit and then make a 90 degree turn to the projector. I don't know how easy it'll be to snake thru with the bend though.....has anyone else done this before?

    Dan M.
     
  8. Daryl RL

    Daryl RL Agent

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    Try a google search on something like 'allowable drill holes in joists'. As far as I could find, most building codes allow for a maximum hole size of 1/6 of the joist size, and the holes must be more than 2" from either edge (so pretty much in the center) of the joist. I don't know if the metal brace things like at Home Depot allow for bigger holes or not.
     
  9. Ronald.H

    Ronald.H Agent

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    In my town, I think code requires the hole be at least 1/3 of the way from the edge of the joist. If it's closer than that, then it requires a double-joist.
     

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