Font test

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Wayne A. Pflughaupt, Jul 31, 2001.

  1. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 1999
    Messages:
    6,043
    Likes Received:
    17
    Location:
    Katy, TX
    Real Name:
    Wayne
    Any speaker cone can bottom out. In fact, smaller speakers are more prone to bottoming than large speakers. The situation occurs when the speaker tries to reproduce high levels of signals below their operating range.
    This is one of the reasons that 2- or 3-way speakers have crossovers. The crossover prevents say, the 4” midrange from trying to reproduce low frequencies that are better handled by a larger driver.
     
  2. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 1999
    Messages:
    6,043
    Likes Received:
    17
    Location:
    Katy, TX
    Real Name:
    Wayne
    Any speaker cone can bottom out. In fact, smaller speakers are more prone to bottoming than large speakers. The situation occurs when the speaker tries to reproduce high levels of signals below their operating range.
    This is one of the reasons that 2- or 3-way speakers have crossovers. The crossover prevents say, the 4” midrange from trying to reproduce low frequencies that are better handled by a larger driver.
     
  3. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 1999
    Messages:
    6,043
    Likes Received:
    17
    Location:
    Katy, TX
    Real Name:
    Wayne
    Any speaker cone can bottom out. In fact, smaller speakers are more prone to bottoming than large speakers. The situation occurs when the speaker tries to reproduce high levels of signals below their operating range.
    This is one of the reasons that 2- or 3-way speakers have crossovers. The crossover prevents say, the 4” midrange from trying to reproduce low frequencies that are better handled by a larger driver?
    Any speaker cone can bottom out. In fact, smaller speakers are more prone to bottoming than large speakers. The situation occurs when the speaker tries to reproduce high levels of signals below their operating range.
    This is one of the reasons that 2- or 3-way speakers have crossovers. The crossover prevents say, the 4” midrange from trying to reproduce low frequencies that are better handled by a larger driver.
    [Edited last by Wayne A. Pflughaupt on July 31, 2001 at 01:16 PM]
    [Edited last by Wayne A. Pflughaupt on July 31, 2001 at 01:17 PM]
     

Share This Page