DVI?

Discussion in 'Computers' started by Chris Huber, Jun 16, 2006.

  1. Chris Huber

    Chris Huber Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2003
    Messages:
    416
    Likes Received:
    0
    [​IMG]

    Anyone tell me what kind of VGA adapter I need for this? I need to know what version of DVI this is...
     
  2. MarkHastings

    MarkHastings Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2003
    Messages:
    12,013
    Likes Received:
    1
  3. Glenn Overholt

    Glenn Overholt Producer

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 1999
    Messages:
    4,203
    Likes Received:
    0
  4. Chris Huber

    Chris Huber Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2003
    Messages:
    416
    Likes Received:
    0
    How does the standard on hook into that? Its totally different...
     
  5. MarkHastings

    MarkHastings Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2003
    Messages:
    12,013
    Likes Received:
    1
    Chris, the connectors that Glenn and I posted, are the same connector.

    Basically you plug one end into the DVI port and the other end allows you to connect a VGA montior cable.
     
  6. Raasean Asaad

    Raasean Asaad Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2002
    Messages:
    962
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thats a PC so you most likely need DVI-D
     
  7. Adam Barratt

    Adam Barratt Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 1998
    Messages:
    2,343
    Likes Received:
    1
    Real Name:
    Adam
    Yes, It's a dual-link DVI-D connector which is a digital-only connection. DVI-I and DVI-A sockets are similar, but have four small additional pins: two above and two below the horizontal pin at the right side of the socket in your photo. The plug you would use for your socket is the following:

    DVI-D (Digital):
    [​IMG]

    To use a simple DVI-to-VGA adaptor you would need to have a socket that supported one of the following plugs, which both support analogue outputs, but neither will fit in the socket on your PC:

    DVI-I (Integrated, meaning digital and analogue):
    [​IMG]

    DVI-A (analogue):
    [​IMG]

    Because DVI-D is digital only it doesn't output a signal that can be easily converted to another analogue socket, such as VGA D-SUB 15. A DVI-to-VGA adaptor plug simply won't work. Sorry.

    Adam
     
  8. Ken Chan

    Ken Chan Producer

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 1999
    Messages:
    3,301
    Likes Received:
    0
    That looks most like DVI-D -- digital only. (Dunno about those two extra vertical slots.) Simple connectors won't work; those use the analog signal in a DVI-A or DVI-I. You need a monitor that displays DVI-D -- any decent LCD should do it nowadays. You can also buy digital-to-VGA converters, but they're a couple hundred bucks.
     
  9. Glenn Overholt

    Glenn Overholt Producer

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 1999
    Messages:
    4,203
    Likes Received:
    0
    Ok Ken, I lost you. The ATI card I had included that connector. I just connected the connector to the card, and the VGA connector to the other end. Easy!

    Glenn
     
  10. Ken Chan

    Ken Chan Producer

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 1999
    Messages:
    3,301
    Likes Received:
    0
    If you look at the image I linked, or at the ones in Adam's post above, you'll note that DVI-I has four pins around the wider bar on the left. These carry the analog RGB signals. So the connector will work. That's what you have.

    But in the image Chris posted, those four pins are missing. It looks more like a DVI-D.
     
  11. Steve Berger

    Steve Berger Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2001
    Messages:
    971
    Likes Received:
    2
    Is that a PC? If that's an A/V unit then it could be a proprietary connector intended to interface a specific flat panel display. Hitachi uses something like that for some of it's Plasma panels that will not connect to anything but the intended panel.
     

Share This Page