Dipole surround placement in 9.1 (DSX)

Discussion in 'Speakers' started by robc1976, Jun 27, 2011.

  1. robc1976

    robc1976 Auditioning

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    Hey guys,

    This is my first post here and I need some opinions on the placement of My RS-52II Dipole surrounds (Link below for discription). I basically have a lot of options....I currently have the on ball mounts I can swivel them slightly and have them toward the listening position not angled down totally level and about 3Ft behind MLP (Figure 1 is my current position). My listening position is a 3 seat stadium seating and I have them angled towards the left & right shoulder of the middle chair. The area behind the listening position is not used much so I am trying to get the best sound near my listening position.


    Figure 2: This would be with the dipoles about 1Ft behind MLP and the aarows show where the sound would basically go....a bit in front of the listening position and behind it.

    My question is wich is better placement? If I where to keep Figure 1 placement is it froened upon to angle these slightly downwards towards the listening position?


    For some reason I could not post pics via image tag on photobucket so I posted the links.


    RS-52II Discription:


    http://www.klipsch.com/rs-52-ii-surround-speaker


    Figure 1: (Current placement)


    http://i733.photobucket.com/albums/ww339/robc1976/9_1placement3.jpg


    http://i733.photobucket.com/albums/ww339/robc1976/Bipoleplacement.jpg


    Figure 2: (Alternate placement)


    http://i733.photobucket.com/albums/ww339/robc1976/9_1placement4.jpg
     
  2. Jason Charlton

    Jason Charlton Ambassador

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    I think you're missing the point on what dipoles do. They don't really "project" sound in two different directions, rather the opposing drivers work to create a broad and diffuse soundfield.


    Have you checked out this handy guide for speaker placement? It doesn't specify bipole/dipole/direct for surrounds, but the idea is really to locate them correctly, and let the speaker design create the soundfield.


    I think both of your proposed locations could work - you should try each and see which sounds better to you.


    More importantly, I'm wondering why you're opting to add both height and wide speakers to your front soundstage? From the looks of the image you posted, your ceiling height isn't really all that high.


    Granted, I've not experienced either height or wide speakers firsthand, and you didn't say what your seating distance, and room width is, but for a small to medium sized room, I'd be worried that height and wide speakers will be too much and will actually degrade the imaging more than it will help.


    Let us know how things work out.
     
  3. robc1976

    robc1976 Auditioning

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    That is a very good point LOL!! My ceilings are not that tall 7'+ but my reciever 4311Ci has the ability to do it so nI hooked them up. The wides made a HUGe difference, my MLP is about 12' from fronts/wides/center.


    So basically what you are saying is that bipoles basically make one huge sound cone as apposed to a radiant speaker making 1 smaller one. I had never used bipoles just direct radiating and always had the tweeter directed towards the MLP...so with these this is not needed? Would you still suggest 2-3 ft above MLP??


    Very much appreciate the response!
     
  4. Jason Charlton

    Jason Charlton Ambassador

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    Whoops - would have helped if I remembered to include the actual LINK to the speaker placement guide I mentioned yesterday. Here it is.


    By and large, surround speakers provide an ambient soundfield - mostly to expand the environment that the film provides (wind, rain, thunder, etc.)


    On occasion, directional sound effects will be used (gunshots, screams, etc.) but those are relatively sparse compared to what the surrounds usually do.


    Bipoles and dipoles can create a much larger diffuse soundfield than direct radiating speakers, so for larger rooms, or for creating a bigger "sweet spot", they are generally preferred.


    Most often the speakers are placed above ear level (not only is it recommended, it's often necessary due to room geometry). 3 feet higher than ear level might be a bit much, but if you have a means of temporarily mounting/positioning them, you should try that and a couple of other locations and play the same part of a movie or two to see which placement sounds better to you.


    Your Denon receiver has one of the latest versions of Audyssey (MultiEQ XT32). Use it. It's probably one of the best features of your receiver. Running Audyssey will fine-tune the speaker levels for you, so it's likely to be able to compensate for any placement challenges you have. In fact, changing the mounting location of your surrounds a foot or two, then running Audyssey may yield virtually identical results!


    One consideration, though. Audyssey has a tendency to set your main speakers to "Full Range", "Large" or some equivalent. If you have a capable subwoofer, you should change this setting to let your subwoofer do the "grunt" work for your mains. Set the a crossover level for your main speakers of 80-120Hz.


    Good luck.
     

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