Columbia to go completely Blu-ray by 2005 (from DavisDVD)

Discussion in 'DVD' started by Johnny G, Mar 30, 2004.

  1. Joshua Clinard

    Joshua Clinard Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2000
    Messages:
    1,821
    Likes Received:
    69
    Location:
    Abilene, TX
    Real Name:
    Joshua Clinard
    I think this is a bad deal all around. This means that since Sony will already be manufacturing Blu-Ray discs, and most likely will not offer discs in the HD-DVD format. It will keep most people from buying either format, because they won't want to invest in two very expensive players. Sony needs to KILL Blu-Ray and sign on to HD-DVD. Sony thinks they are the God of electronics, and they are not! Remember Minidisc and Beta?
     
  2. Nils Luehrmann

    Nils Luehrmann Producer

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2001
    Messages:
    3,513
    Likes Received:
    0
    Your not the first to express this concern, but then again, I'm not sure why anyone should feel this way?

    It is like saying you want less innovation and fewer technological improvements.

    The current limitations of standard DVD are significant. Even without an HD display, HD-DVD is still a remarkable improvement over DVD thanks to its far greater storage capabilities. Thus you'll have far fewer compression artifacts in both audio and video.

    If anything, it is the manufacturers that have to worry about offering a higher quality product too quickly. That said, 7-10 years is hardly too quickly and the original R&D costs of DVD technology were paid off in profits a very, very long time ago!

    If it is simply about wanting to retain a monetary value to your current DVD collection and you have no desire to enjoy a better quality product, then by all means - you are not going to like HD-DVD.

    If on the other hand, it is more important to you to see your favorite films in the best possible presentation, then you will be extraordinarily pleased with what HD-DVD has to offer. It is without a doubt the most remarkable improvement in the history of video technology, and will likely be the catalyst for many consumers to finally replace their standard TVs for HDTV. In fact with the tremendous improvements in projection technology and rapidly dropping prices for projectors, I suspect just as sales of DVDs increased sales of large screen TVs - HD-DVD sales will have a similar effect on projector sales.
     
  3. MarcusUdeh

    MarcusUdeh Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2003
    Messages:
    785
    Likes Received:
    0



    SACD is by far superior to DVD-A
     
  4. Jeff Ulmer

    Jeff Ulmer Producer

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 1998
    Messages:
    5,584
    Likes Received:
    0

    That remains to be seen, in theory it is true, but until we have mass produced discs, we won't know for sure. I would also be wary that the increased data storage could exascerbate problems due to normal usage, and in fact increase the number of flaws that exist. Things like scratches and dust which already can cause playback problems with DVD will be even more of an issue with the data being crammed into a smaller physical space. Again, until we have actual product in our homes under normal environmental and useage situations, the true benefit/downside to the technology remains to be seen.

    As for why the introduction of a new format every 10 years is of concern, it comes down to consumer confidence. The majority of those adopting DVD will only see a year or two before a new format comes along, which could negatively affect their decision to make those large purchases that we early adopters did to get DVD off the ground. I am already to a point where I am reluctant to buy a number of catalogue releases, and once HD is fully launched, I will be skipping the DVD release entirely.

    That said, I am also reluctant to get in on the ground floor of any HD format, especially if there are two or more factions fighting for market acceptance (one reason why I have not, and will not be buying into hi def audio in the near future). I was there when the ground broke on DVD, I can't say it will be the same with a HD format.
     
  5. JonathanG

    JonathanG Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2002
    Messages:
    56
    Likes Received:
    0
    super-superbit anyone?
     
  6. PaulP

    PaulP Producer

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2001
    Messages:
    3,291
    Likes Received:
    0
    I too believe this is way, way to soon to go head-first into any sort of DVD alternative. I can imagine Columbia doing something like D-VHS, where they'd release a handfull of titles each week or month, for those that want HD. Most consumers, as stated numerous times, have just begun accepting DVD. To have Columbia suddenly switch to a new and unknown to most format next year is just bad business. DVD sales are constantly growing, we are still far from having even half of VHS titiles on disc, and yet Columbia wants to abandon that and start anew? [​IMG]
     
  7. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 1999
    Messages:
    16,738
    Likes Received:
    129
    Sony didn't say anything about "abandoning" the DVD-Video format, nor would it. With DVD sales now outpacing box-office receipts, no studio is going to give up its place at the trough.

    The issue is: How serious a format war are we in for, or will the Blu-ray and HD-DVD formats coexist peacefully the way SACD and DVD-Audio do?
     
  8. Lawrence X

    Lawrence X Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2003
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    0
    I can tell you nobody with a projector or very large plasma display has any doubts about the need for HD. Once you're projecting on a 108" screen, the limitations of DVD are very real and the extra resolution really makes the film closer to how you see it at the theaters.

    On a 40" TV the need is debatable, on 80"+ there's no more debate. Bring it on! It can't come a day too soon for me.
     
  9. BryanV

    BryanV Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2004
    Messages:
    135
    Likes Received:
    0
    Why, why, why.

    Sony has the memory of a fly.

    Hey Sony remember BETA and Minidisk?

    I think the reason DVD did so well is because they all got on board in stead of fighting over the format.

    You simply have to have a selection.
     
  10. Carlos Garcia

    Carlos Garcia Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2004
    Messages:
    1,065
    Likes Received:
    0
    Sounds like Columbia Tri-Star wants to put all its eggs in one basket. Good luck to them. Since I believe the public will treat Blu-Ray like they treated laserdiscs, Columbia Tri-Star will be the first major company to wave Bye Bye! Judging by the poor quality they do on most of their DVD releases, it couldn't happen to a better company!

    Carlos.
     
  11. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 1999
    Messages:
    16,738
    Likes Received:
    129
    Re the above two posts:

    * The studios did not embrace DVD-Video when it was launched -- many resisted while some bought into Dvix. A couple of studios didn't even want progressive-scan DVD players brought to market. Don't remember any of that?

    * Where are people getting off about the allegedly "low" quality of Columbia-Tristar's DVD product?
     
  12. PaulP

    PaulP Producer

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2001
    Messages:
    3,291
    Likes Received:
    0
    Well the reason I said that Columbia is abandoning DVD is because of what is written in the article:



    It seems to me from this sentence that Columbia's plan is to release Blu-Ray home video products exclusively, thus stopping VHS, DVD and other home video formats in their company. If you infer anything else from this sentence, perhaps you're reaching...
     
  13. Jeff_HR

    Jeff_HR Producer

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2001
    Messages:
    3,594
    Likes Received:
    0
    The Betamax format did not lose to VHS because it was an inferior technology, there were other reasons.
     
  14. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 1998
    Messages:
    21,763
    Likes Received:
    2

    Sorry, but you're the one who's reaching. There's nothing about "exclusive" releases on Blu-Ray in either the quote or the article. Nor would that make any business sense, since (as with any new technology) there will be a meaningful period during which most consumers don't own the requisite playback equipment.

    The obvious historical precedent for this is the introduction of DVD. The studios that were early proponents of DVD (and that includes CTS) continued to issue their films on VHS for a very long time. There were no "exclusively on DVD" releases. (Something similarly has occurred with D-VHS.)

    With DVD players now in millions of households, it would be fiscal suicide for any studio to ignore that market until and unless another format achieves equal market penetration. And that won't happen for quite some time, even if Blu-Ray is a success (and that remains to be seen).

    M.
     
  15. Nils Luehrmann

    Nils Luehrmann Producer

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2001
    Messages:
    3,513
    Likes Received:
    0
    Paul,

    The problem here is that the quote isn't even from Columbia. It is from a news item posted on Davis DVD.

    As far as you, or anyone else who was not in attendance at the "Digital Hollywood" reception, we have no idea what Ben Feingold actually said. This is especially true as even the post on Davis DVD did not put quotations on his remark regarding that statement. I suspect who ever wrote that news item either was given misinformation, or misinterpreted Mr. Feingold's statement.

    I would think it obvious that Sony is not about to stop making standard DVDs for many years to come, let alone declare in public that they are abandoning it next year. Besides, if you were to actually expect that remark as truth, then what it says is that every Columbia-TriStar home video product would be available on Blu-Ray by the end of 2005.

    Uh... so you actually believe that they will release their entire library of home video on Blue-Ray by 2006? Its been seven years and CTHV still hasn't released hundreds of VHS titles onto standard DVD. Seriously, that quote in Davis DVD is obviously inaccurate and misleading.

    I suspect what Mr. Feingold actually said was that CTHV is pledging to release titles onto Blu-Ray by the end of 2005. Perhaps he even suggested that all future releases at that point will always be available on Blu-Ray. This would be noteworthy as when Columbia-TriStar, as well as all the other studios, first began to release titles onto DVD, they only released some new titles on DVD and the others were released only on VHS. Frankly I suspect the same will be true for HiDef DVD at least for the first couple years.

    Of course without an actual quote, all of this is conjecture.
     
  16. CraigL

    CraigL Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2000
    Messages:
    1,863
    Likes Received:
    0
    FYI...I would take a lot of things on DavidDVD with a grain of salt.



    Their continuing interest in P&S releases is reason enough, don't you agree?
     
  17. Alistair_M

    Alistair_M Second Unit

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2002
    Messages:
    276
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm a bit surprised at the negativity towards Sony and Columbria Tristar.

    Basically - lots of decent movies will be available in high definition by the end of 2005.


    Some of films I'd love to see in High Def by Columbria:

    Spiderman
    Close Encounters of the Third Kind
    Air Force One
    As good as it gets
    Lawrence of Arabia
    Philadelphia
    Crouching Tiger
    Black Hawk Down
    Sense and Sensibility
    Starship Troopers
    Das Boot
    Bran Stockers Dracula
    Groundhog Day
    Messenger the Story of Joan Of Arc
    Underworld
    Seven Years in Tibet
    Age of Innocence
    Bridge on the River Kwai
    Gandhi
    Big Chill
    Remains of the Day
    Adaptation
    Guns of Navarone
    A Man for All seasons
    On the Waterfront
    Enigma
    His Girl Friday
    Lost Horizon
    Mr Smith goes to Washington
    Talk of the Town
    Birdy
    It happened one night
    Mr Deeds goes to Town
    Oliver
    Passage to India
    From Here to Eternity
    King rat
    Monty Python Life of Brian


    plenty to get started with....
     
  18. Neil_Duffy

    Neil_Duffy Second Unit

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2001
    Messages:
    319
    Likes Received:
    0
    I could be wrong, but didn't someone put an Aprils fools day gag on a website last year about only producing blu-ray discs in future.

    Having said that, I'mtkaing the statement as true, simply cause Columbia have been the studio to milk the sperbit stuff and multoiple releases, which frankly,are tiring just about everyone out.

    Like I said initially, what is the rush to blu-ray? Do they expect us to re-invest in our collection that soon?

    I'm afriad this one reeks of greed and marketing.
     
  19. RobertR

    RobertR Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 1998
    Messages:
    9,694
    Likes Received:
    164


    I think part of the cost of the peaceful coexistence of SACD and DVD-A is that neither is really taking off as the next generation audio format. Sony can brag all they want about the number of titles they're bringing out, but the fact is that CD still far, far outstrips them in sales, and is in no danger of being overtaken for many years, if ever. Meanwhile, the DVD-A people have been shooting themselves in the foot with poor marketing and excessive paranoia about piracy. I see a strong possibility that HD-DVD will repeat the same pattern, with the same blunders. With DVD, you had essentially one format (once DIVX was killed off) that a studio could use, and that contributed mightily to its success.

    The other comparison with the audio world is, will most people appreciate the quality difference between DVD and HD-DVD, or will they shrug and say DVD is good enough for them (another reason SACD and DVD-A aren't selling that well)? No matter how enthusiastic people are about HD-DVD here and on AVS, we represent a small fraction of the market. Given all the above and the roaring success of DVD, I agree that it makes no sense to interpret the Columbia statements as meaning that they will abandon DVD in less than two years.
     
  20. Nils Luehrmann

    Nils Luehrmann Producer

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2001
    Messages:
    3,513
    Likes Received:
    0
    Alistair,

    I believe the reason for the general dislike of Columbia-TriStar DVDs is that for every high quality OAR special edition release, CTHV will release several sub-standard MAR DVDs. Not only that, but CTHV is one of the worst when it comes to double/tripple/quadruple dipping DVD releases. No studio is perfect, but it is also understandable why many DVD collectors consider CTHV as one of the worst offenders, not the worst, but certainly one of.
    Craig, this may be the most accurate quote posted on this thread so far. [​IMG]

    On the subject of HD-DVD, Blu-Ray, market confusion, and the 'brilliant' decision making over at Sony. From a strictly marketing stand point, you have to wonder what Sony was thinking when they came up with the name "Blu-Ray" for their HiDef DVD format? This has to rank as one of the worst, most confusing names given to a consumer based technology.

    Next time you are in a large electronics store (Best Buy, Fry's, Circuit City, etc) ask ten people if they have heard of or know what Blu-Ray is. Now ask them if they have heard of or know what HD-DVD is.

    At a recent Hi-Def DVD demonstration where both HD-DVD and Blu-Ray where being exhibited the topic came up and even those who knew what Blu-Ray was kept referring to it as HD-DVD. While some may think a name is only a name and wont impact sales. Don't tell that to anyone with marketing experience. A poorly selected name can be enough to sink an otherwise successful product. If consumers are not able to distinguish a product by its name more often than not, they wont buy it. Frankly, the same can be said for a company, but not nearly as much as individual products.

    The first time I heard Sony announce "Blu-Ray" I was thinking, who ever came up with that name and the execs that signed for it better start getting their resumes in order. [​IMG]

    While Blu-Ray is an obvious reference to the blue laser, the problem is that even many big time DVD collectors and supporters of DVD don't know anything about the different lasers, and many probably do not even know that standard DVD players use a red laser.

    Now the folks at the DVD Forum win the prize for best product name "HD-DVD". This is really a no-brainer. Most everyone has heard of HD if not already seen examples of it. Open a newspaper, watch the news, and you'll see countless adds for HDTVs, HD programming, HD Satellite Service, etc. Many prime-time network shows are now available in HD and at the start of the show it says so. It seems you can't go anywhere these days without being reminded of HD.

    Consumers don't care what color the laser is, they care about the quality of the image. As proven by the many junk TVs that sell really well when advertised as HDTVs, consumers now associate those two letters "HD" with premium performance.

    All I can say is frankly I hope Blu-Ray is not like Betamax in that Beta was technologically a better product than VHS. Because regardless of the quality of Blu-Ray, there is enough going against it such that in its current form it will not likely succeed.
     

Share This Page