Closed Captioning Vs. Subtitles

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Kevin M, Aug 20, 2002.

  1. Kevin M

    Kevin M Producer

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    I thought I would stop going off topic in the Near Dark review thread and start a new thread dedicated to the subject. Here is my last post in that thread..
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    You know I really don't want to belabor this off topic point anymore that it already has been, but my girlfriend (who is deaf) pointed something out to me regarding the CC vs. Subtitles debate that I hadn't considered before.
    Most* DVD Subtitles only offer text translations of the dialog where as true Closed Captioning (be it player generated or not) offers not only dialog but text descriptions of important sound effect & music therefore offering a more complete translation of the soundtrack.
    *I say most because after she said this to me I decided to check out 20 of my DVD's to see if she was right and 16 out of the 20 discs I checked only had Subtitles (with no description of sounds etc.) Criterion & Fox seem to offer, more often than not, player generated CC as opposed to just Subtitles, WB=player G Sub/cc - Columbia=Player G Sub/cc -Universal=Player generated CC(but personally I hate their style) etc. etc.
    The conclusion that I draw is that whether it is more pleasing to the eye or not, I would think the version offering the more accurate description of the film would be the most preferred.
    I would say that more studios need to put player generated CC as well as Subtitles on their DVD's.
     
  2. luke j. chung

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    I prefer player-generated subtitles myself, as I have a progressive-scan player hooked up to my 40" Toshiba 16:9 HDTV rear projector, and the close captioning cancels itself out when you play the disc in progressive scan mode!
    FYI, I am hearing-impaired.
     
  3. Ken Chan

    Ken Chan Producer

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    I'm confused by your distinction of "player-generated" CC being a feature of the disc. As I understand it, the video stream either has CC (on line 23 of NTSC) or not. And that's completely separate from whether it has subtitle streams (which are actually subpictures that don't have to be subtitles).

    When the video gets to my TV, I can have it display the CC or not. By that point the subtitles, if any, have also been overlayed on the picture. I suppose you can have players that also read the CC from the video stream and overlay them as well, just like subtitles, but that would be a feature of the player.

    And yes, traditionally subtitles did not carry the hints for the hearing-impaired like "[Doorbell rings]", but I've certainly seen subtitles on DVDs that do that. They may actually get the time-coded text from the same agencies that do captions.

    Support for CC tends to be a high-end authoring feature, not that that matters much for studio-produced DVDs, since they are using those high-end systems.

    //Ken
     
  4. Jeff Kleist

    Jeff Kleist Executive Producer

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    They use the CC script to generate the subtitle images
     
  5. Kevin M

    Kevin M Producer

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  6. Thik Nongyow

    Thik Nongyow Stunt Coordinator

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    I would like to bring up the issue of close captioning and subtitles on DVD.

    Even though dialog is subtitled and close captioned, does not mean you are reading what the characters in the movie are actually saying. I noticed on some DVDs that words, phrases and even sentences are omitted in the subtitles or close captioning. Never assume that what you read on the TV screen is what is heard in the movie.
     
  7. KyleK

    KyleK Second Unit

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    Sometimes I watch movies with subtitles (like late at night with the volume down) and I noticed that often the subtitles don't translate answers such as "yes" and "no" or when charachters say each other's names. How are hearing impaired people supposed to know know what they are saying(besides lip-reading)?
     

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