Capturing video from CNN Pipeline

Discussion in 'Computers' started by DanHaya, Sep 12, 2006.

  1. DanHaya

    DanHaya Second Unit

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    I'm just wondering if anyone has had any success capturing the streaming video feeds from CNN Pipeline? I would like to save their 9/11 coverage for educational purposes, but I can't seem to download it.
     
  2. Joseph DeMartino

    Joseph DeMartino Lead Actor

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    I'm sure it is designed to be hard to capture, since despite being coverage of a real-world event the pictures, commentary, graphics, etc. are copyrighted material that belongs to CNN. I don't know if they have (or will) release the "live as it happened" coverage on commercial DVD, but you might want to contact them about educational use of the footage. (I know CNN did release a retrospective DVD that used a great many excerpts from the live coverage of 9/11 and the days that immediately followed.)

    Regards ,

    Joe
     
  3. DanHaya

    DanHaya Second Unit

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    I contacted CNN a couple of years ago about this. They would be more than happy to sell me the footage for $50/hour, but that is a little pricey considering the events of the day.

    I don't think any network will ever rebroadcast their original coverage on over-the-air television or release it on DVD. But since CNN was offering the footage on Pipeline, I thought they might at least consider letting people download it. I guess not. [​IMG]
     
  4. peterac

    peterac Agent

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    Would this be any different from a copyright standpoint than taping CNN on your VCR?
     
  5. Joseph DeMartino

    Joseph DeMartino Lead Actor

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    No, in that technically both would be illegal for Dan's purposes. [​IMG] The famous "Betamax" decision allows for time-shifting of programs, but it doesn't sanction keeping archival copies permanently* or creating a video library. As a practical matter nobody is going to bother enforcing this for individual users, much less invest time and money in tracking them down, but it still is copyright infringement.

    Regards,

    Joe

    * Even educational shows that are part of the "Cable in the Classroom" initiative, which are shown without commercials and with the specific intention of having teachers record them for later use, emphasize this fact. The copyright notice gives the user specific permission to archive the program for a strictly limited period and includes the date on which all copies of the recording must be destroyed, I think usually a year or 18 months after the broadcast date. So even while creating an exception the industry is asserting that it must grant permission for users to retain copyrighted materials beyond a brief window for time-shifting and then setting a limit on the retention of the material covered by the exception.
     

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