Building a new PC any burn-in programs out there for free?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Gordon Moore, Oct 11, 2001.

  1. Gordon Moore

    Gordon Moore Second Unit

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    As the subject line states. Burn-in is still necessary, isn't it? It's been a while since I've upgraded. (Last one in '97);
     
  2. Camp

    Camp Cinematographer

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  3. Iain Lambert

    Iain Lambert Screenwriter

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    3D Mark 2001 is highly recommended for testing stability; stick it on loop mode and run for a few hours. If that doesn't cause you to hit any possible memory, driver or heating problems then I doubt anything will.
     
  4. Neil T

    Neil T Auditioning

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    I have to say I think testing and burn-in are two separate issues. Testing a new system is always a good idea but burn-in is unnecessary and wrong in my opinion. Component failure is often linked to thermal changes, the heating up ang cooling down of components. For this reason I would suggest that normal or sporadic (power up/down) of a new system will probably help it "settle down" more quickly.
    ------------------
    Neil.
    The only bad opinion is no opinion.
     
  5. Gordon Moore

    Gordon Moore Second Unit

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    Thanks for the opinions. While I'm not out to crash/damage my system, I do want to ensure stability. Since I'm putting together the system with mostly OEM parts (to keep cost down...but only 30 day - 1 year warranties), I want to make sure that it's up to the task. That being said, when I flick the power switch and I get to the BIOS screen, I'll be pretty happy. (it is only a new motherboard and CPU and memory but the most critical components so I want to ensure they work).
     

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