Blu-ray Sales Historical Trends Reports and Discussion

Discussion in 'Blu-ray and UHD' started by Kosty, Jun 12, 2012.

  1. Kosty

    Kosty Supporting Actor

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    PLEASE USE THIS THREAD FOR ANY DISCUSSION OF LONG TERM BLU-RAY SALES RESULTS OR TRENDS OR ARTICLES
    LIKE HISTORICAL QUARTERLY ANNUAL SALES OR MARKET TRENDS

    PLEASE USE THE OTHER THREADS FOR DISCUSSION OF SHORT TERM WEEKLY OR BY TITLE BLU-RAY OR DVD SALES RESULTS​
     
  2. Kosty

    Kosty Supporting Actor

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  3. Kosty

    Kosty Supporting Actor

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    from HDD with some historical data links
    This is a the newest version ( started January 2012) continuation of the Nielsen/Videoscan sales thread.
    This thread is for all discussion of Blu-ray sales stats on how Blu-ray sales are compared to DVD . Discussion of the Home Media Magazine stats and all other industry released sales statistics on Blu-ray is encouraged. This mostly will focus on software sales, as we get the most consistent information there, but relevent hardware sales talk is also allowed.
    The first pages or so have summary posts aor historical data or stuff I think are useful as reference for the 2011 discussion. Requests to put stuff on the top of the thread can be posted in the thread or PMd to me or I may harvest stuff as I see it.
    Discussion on current week sales figures are generally near the last couple pages of the thread, with current new weekly data coming in sometime late Wednesday afternoon to late evening when Home Media Magazine and The Hollywood Reporter give initial info on the Nielsen Videoscan first alert data which is released on that day for the last weeks data which ends on Sunday.
    I've stopped trying to give a link to the latest week's discussion as the early posting of the Blu-ray and DVD research charts at Home Media magazine's homepage on Wednesday has kinda blended things together. Just go the last few pages of the thread and look for the graphs and charts to find the start of this weeks current discussion.
    We now get the Nielsen Videoscan first alert Top 20 Sellers and Top 20 Blu-ray and BD Title Share and Rental charts publised a week before we get the revenue numbers from HMM, on a Monday through Sunday reporting week.
    The revenue numbers for Blu-ray and DVD are now coming from HMM a week later with a one day offset with a Sunday through Saturday reporting week starting mid December 2010.
    older threads located here:
    http://forums.highdefdigest.com/high-definition-smackdown/112109-2011-blu-ray-sales-metrics-stats-weekly-hmm-nielsen-videoscan-quarterly-rentrak-deg.html
    http://forums.highdefdigest.com/high-definition-smackdown/98036-2010-blu-ray-sales-metrics-stats-nielsen-videoscan-hmm-charts-ratios-bestsellers-etc.html
    2009 Blu-ray Sales Metrics Stats: Nielsen/Videoscan/HMM Charts/Ratios/Bestsellers Etc
    Nielsen/VideoScan 2008 Sales Metrics Thread: Ratios, Bestsellers, Weekly Charts etc
    2007 sales metrics thread
    For the record:
    Why and how I do this stuff...
    ..
    Old Nielsen Videoscan retailers list and Nielsen Videoscan overview
    All of the charts involving individual titles and their Blu-ray marketshare or relative sales Index numbers are always based on unit sales. They are generated based on the units sold by SKU off the Nielsen Videoscan first alert report that comes out on Wednesday for the week ending the Sunday before.
    Any charts based on the Nielsen Videoscan first alert report also don't include Wal-Mart in their Blu-ray marketshare or unit calculations, although its a fair assumption that Wal-Mart sales would be similar, especially as Blu-ray has become more mainstream and mass market and lower in price and the Walmart share of Blu-ray sales has risen over time.
    Only HMM statistic that is revenue based is the overall format revenues and now the pie chart. Thats based on the Nielsen Videoscan first alert report, plus HMMs adjustment for Wal-Mart revenues and probably a nudge up for the first alert versus final number undercount. As of mid December 2010 HMM now uses additional input directly from the studios to generate the revenue data and has delayed the publication of the DVD and Blu-ray data for one week behind the individual title information and top 20 charts. As stated above, the revenue data is now offset one day with a Sunday through Saturday reporting week.
     
  4. Kosty

    Kosty Supporting Actor

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  5. Kosty

    Kosty Supporting Actor

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  6. Kosty

    Kosty Supporting Actor

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    http://www.homemediamagazine.com/market-analysis/year-turnaround-25968
    This weeks digital issue is up.
    This special year end issue of HMM is usually the one that gets mass free distribution to all of the attendees at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. This year its January 10-14, 2012.
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    http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/questex/hom904467YNC/index.php?startid=Cover1&WidgetId=null&BookId=122b5c2e519abbf576c3302066daa996#/3/OnePage
     
  7. Kosty

    Kosty Supporting Actor

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    Here are just the quotes as best I can see in context:
     
  8. Kosty

    Kosty Supporting Actor

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    Releases matter.
    Notice its Time Warner not just the studio Warner.
    http://www.homemediamagazine.com/warner/time-warner-cfo-q4-home-entertainment-sales-challenged-26035
    http://www.deadline.com/2012/01/blu-ray-vod-home-video-recovery/
     
  9. Kosty

    Kosty Supporting Actor

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    Twice
    http://www.twice.com/article/478896-BDA_Sees_Blu_ray_Growth_For_Years_To_Come.php
    http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/blu-ray-harry-potter-280185
    http://www.homemediamagazine.com/market-analysis/deg-blu-ray-digital-helped-lift-2011-26070
    http://paidcontent.org/article/419-the-bleeding-in-the-home-entertainment-business-slowed-in-2011/
    http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/entertainmentnewsbuzz/
    http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/01/11/us-utraviolet-idUSTRE80A08S20120111
    http://m.paidcontent.org/article/419-the-bleeding-in-the-home-entertainment-business-slowed-in-2011/
     
  10. Kosty

    Kosty Supporting Actor

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    http://www.homemediamagazine.com/tks-take/deg-numbers-are-good-news-home-entertainment
     
  11. Kosty

    Kosty Supporting Actor

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    2012 Thread open for discussion.
    The end of year articles and final DEG and HMM numbers have been transferred to this thread for ready reference.
    The data for the 2012 weeks already reported have been transferred to this thread as well.

    I look forward to all of the discussion throughout the year.
    Best Wishes of the new year to all of you.

    Kosty
     
  12. Kosty

    Kosty Supporting Actor

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    Home Media Magazine has a new feature on their website.
    HMM is now posting up the unit numbers each week.
    If you click on the pie chart on the HMM website you get a detailed sales report chart that also includes the unit sales figures.
    Once you click on the weekly pie chart graphic you now get this detailed sales report which includes the revenue graphic, the box office strength of the weekly new releases, the unit sales for Blu-ray and DVD and the average price comparisons from this week to last years matching week.
    At the bottom left corner of the Sales Report you can go back to subsequent weeks. The data is available now back through week ending 12/10/11.
    http://www.homemediamagazine.com/market-analysis/sales-report-week-ended-011412
    http://www.homemediamagazine.com/market-analysis/sales-report-week-ended-010712
     
  13. Kosty

    Kosty Supporting Actor

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    They have long been the only DVD sales data available and probably have been fairly accurate for DVD sales as the toughest part to estimate Walmart unit sales and revenues from Walmart DVD sales has been stable for many years at about 40% of DVD units and revenues.
    In some comments at The-Numbers they have stated about 10% accuracy for revenues and closer than that for units. But they design their databases to be most accurate for long term cumulative sales and they do not adjust the older weekly reporting for better data so sometimes the weekly figures are adjusted to make the cumulative figures more accurate.
    Blu-ray is more problematic as it has been a non stable moving target and the Walmart sales for Blu-ray units and revenues has changed dramatically over the years of Blu-ray's existence. My personal feelings is that their cumulative unit figures are fairly accurate 5% to 10% but their estimations of revenues generated for Walmart Blu-ray sales can be much more wild and off especially for major releases that have a lot of volumes. They sometimes have a large adjustment in second week and subsequent week reports to bring into accuracy the cumulative totals because their first week estimates for major titles are somewhat wild.
    I've been told that in general terms their unit and revenue estimates for DVD are pretty close or as good as can be expected within say 10% of being true. The Blu-ray cumulative totals for titles over time gain the same or similar accuracy around 10% but sometimes their initial weekly estimates for major large volume Blu-ray releases can be far more wild. I think their estimates for revenues for Blu-ray titles especially if there is a large volume sold at Walmart can have a wild range and margin of error as well for specific weeks. They tend also to place the cumulative totals as being more a priority than individual weekly estimates and often the weekly data is adjusted to bring the cumulative totals into closer to true.
    Again they are our only source for individual title revenues and units sold so they are better than nothing and the relationship between the titles seem to be consistent in ratios and magnitudes. even if the overall magnitude is problematic.
    For older records for DVD they are probably within 5% to 10% of what really happened.
    Blu-ray has only been available since May of last year and units are probably closer than Blu-ray revenues. Blu-ray revenues seem to be always trending quite high for major releases probably because of errors in their methodology in estimating Walmart Blu-ray sales which is the toughest thing for anyone to do.
    Like any data source the long term trending and comparisons between titles are always going to be most accurate over time and the most useful use of the database while the raw magnitude of units and revenues are always going to be more problematic especially on comparison with other data sources. The long term trends are always going to be more accurate than any shorter period or individual title magnitudes.
    Some here think that their variations and alleged mismatch with HMM weekly revenues and other weekly variations make The-Numbers database useless as a tool. I disagree with that as I understand that the trending and internal comparisons in their consistent methodology make them a useful tool even with limitations and I accept that the magnitudes of the Blu-ray estimates, especially Blu-ray revenues are probably high as a house bias with a wider variance than Blu-ray units or DVD units or revenues.
    All of the data sources we have available , including HMM The-Numbers, Rentrak, CEA , NPD and the DEG are all estimates of millions of transactions. All are only estimates and best guesses of a very complicated detailed marketplace with limitations based on models, data availability and time they have to compile the data.
    The DEG is considered the best source by the industry as they have the most inputs and the most time to compile the data but its still an estimate after all. One of the things that make the DEG different is that they do revise their data after publication in their yearly data when they have found significant data changes in the historical data sets from the sources they use that include Rentrak Video Essentials.
    Having the most accurate historical data is a service to the industry and not some sort of grand conspiracy as some imagine. Its always better to have the most accurate historical data even if it has changed over time and its not like the DEG has not noted the revisions.
     
  14. Kosty

    Kosty Supporting Actor

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    On target comment.
    Agreed.
    They also all agree in the trends over time even if the magnitudes are off a bit between the databases or details in the short term or with specific weeks or individual titles have variations.
    The trends are more important and all of them show the same long term trends. All are estimates and show a different piece of the puzzle and have different advantages.
    But its always going to be problematic when you try to compare magnitudes or details in any separate databases that are estimates especially in the case where the reporting periods are different like the even week HMM and Nielsen Videoscan and The-Numbers weekly reports that have offset even seven week periods (either Sun-Sat or Mon-Sun) and calendar based even quarterly and annual reports like we get from the DEG.
    But when you look at the all together a more comprehensive and detailed picture of the long term trends emerge even if the pieces and parts do not always match in the details or the short term.
     
  15. Kosty

    Kosty Supporting Actor

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    From another site, but I thought it would be useful for me to post it here as well.
    Here's a bit of my perspective on why I tend to be more optimistic and positive and less pessimistic and negative on Blu-ray than some others.
    I always try to understand everyone's point of view even when I disagree with it and I'll try to use the words more pessimistic to be more descriptive in the future than routine. But I certainly do not think someone calling me more optimistic or less pessimistic than others here is name calling or inaccurate.
    I certainly take a less pessimistic point of view of Blu-ray sales and growth for many reasons and I try to express why I hold that opinion to the best of my abilities.
    First off, Blu-ray has long ago exceeded the expectations I and many others had of it during the format war. Virtually all of $100 M plus box office titles now are already in Blu-ray release and thousands more Blu-ray catalog movies will be released from the studio libraries.
    Blu-ray has long ago exceeded the expectations I and many others had of it during the format war. Virtually all of $100 M plus box office titles now are already in Blu-ray release and thousands more Blu-ray catalog movies will be released from the studio libraries. Virtually every major studio release now comes on Blu-ray and will be so in the foreseeable future with an ever increasing marketshare.
    Even if Blu-ray never reaches DVD's level of success its still going to contribute billions of dollars of profits to retailers and the studios for many years and its a high margin successor to DVD that will still preserve much of the sell through revenue stream for many years.
    I do not focus as much as some of you on Blu-ray's inability to fully cover DVD's attrition as I strongly feel that Blu-ray is not expected to by itself make up for DVDs decline as its seen as part of the answer in conjunction with other new digital and cloud based revenue streams.
    Blu-ray is still the largest new high margin revenue stream with the exception of EST which is still much smaller in magnitude and both Blu-ray and DVD revenues are still huge even with DVDs decline. Its a important part of studio and retailer revenues.
    I also see Blu-ray as doing best in the very important new release segment which is the highest profit source of the home video marketplace. Its not covering DVDs total attrition but much of the DVD decline is in low price point low margin low price point catalog sales that the studios gain less profit from than new releases.
    I don't ever expect Blu-ray to ever be what DVD was at its peak nor do retailers or industry people I talk with. But considering the alternative of what would have happened if Blu-ray was not available as a high definition next generation DVD format, where low margin cheap rentals or unlimited subscription streaming would be the same or even greater quality than standard definition DVD.
    Many people I know understand that a sustainable and growing Blu-ray revenue stream and growing marketshare that transitioned much of the new release sell through market from DVD to Blu-ray is far better than if Blu-ray had never existed.
    Even at levels still below DVD , billions of dollars of Blu-ray revenue and growing marketshare still means success as a consumer product for retailers and the studios. Not to mention availability as a high quality alternative to other cloud based options to consumers.
    I think a lot of people here tend to always focus on the negative for Blu-ray instead of seeing it as a consumer success because of constant comparisons to DVD or with what I feel is an unrealistic expectation or standard that Blu-ray alone was meant to replace DVD.
    Blu-ray exists in a new world of consumer options for entertainment and multiple yet smaller revenue streams for the studios in the second decade of the 21st century. Cheaper rental options from Netflix and Redbox and cloud based options like Hulu Vudu etc are here and cannot be undone.
    That's a different world than when DVD was at its peak.
    I see those things realistically and I and others realize that Blu-ray will never be like DVD so to see others constantly dwell on the fact that Blu-ray is failing to make up for DVD's attrition by itself seems unnecessarily negative or pessimistic to me as I feel that at least now now one expects Blu-ray to ever do that by itself.
    Perhaps as the years have gone by and the market and economic and technological conditions have changed, the expectations for Blu-ray have evolved throughout the years, but Blu-ray is and can certainly be seen by many, including myself as a success and a high quality alternative that will be an important part of the studio and retailer home video market for many years to come.
    Blu-ray is a high margin highly profitable consumer product category that continues to grow in revenues and marketshare and is at a level that is still huge by normal retail standards of a consumer good, even if its smaller than DVD. Most consumer products are low margin and are much smaller than DVD or even Blu-ray's current size. Blu-ray does not have to be at DVDs level to be considered to be a success.
    Sure, I'm a lot more optimistic than some here and I tend to post more on the positive side of things. Others that are more pessimistic than me tend to cover the more negative side of things pretty well without my help. But neither viewpoint is complete by itself and its not healthy to focus on one side or the other all the time.
    Throughout the years, I have never felt shy of pointing out when I disagree with others but I always have strived to explain my point of view and why I disagree to the best of my ability and I will continue to do so in the future.
    Again thanks you all for consideration of my point of view.
     
  16. Kosty

    Kosty Supporting Actor

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    I trust the The-Numbers unit data far more than I do the revenue data and I trust their cumulative totals more than any weekly data especially for Blu-ray. I also have more faith in their longer term DVD data which they have used the same established methodology for many years now since 2006. Even if its off in magnitude, its off by the same house bias in year to year comparisons within the same database and the trends would still be accurate and the relative comparative magnitudes between the years the same.
    That being said their DVD data has been done the same way since 2006 probably can be assumed to be internally consistent. The unit numbers for DVD should also be more accurate for DVD than Blu-ray as its a lot simpler to estimate the long term stable percentage for Walmart for DVD than it was before last fall for Blu-ray.
    In any case, they are estimates anyway and even if they are off last year as much as some may claim they still are order of magnitude correct by title and in the aggregate in scale.
    Its a lot simpler to estimate units than revenues because retailers can change prices locally and nationally at short notice and other checks such as units shipped or observed in inventory.
    We also can see now that their Blu-ray unit estimates track with the calculation made from either estimating the individual title Blu-ray unit share to their DVD unit estimates or by extending the Blu-ray index numbers from Nielsen Videoscan down from the estimate for the leading Blu-ray title (found by either seeing their Blu-ray #1 title estimate or using their DVD #1 title estimate and calculating an estimate for the #1 Blu-ray title by using the Nielsen Videoscan marketshare).
    The Nielsen Videoscan Blu-ray marketshare is probably closer since the later half of last year than it was earlier as Walmart's Blu-ray share and unit sales has risen over time, but the previous year's calculation should only be off a 5% - 10% for all genres and closer for Blu-ray favorable genres even for last year.
    The-Numbers was probably not overestimating DVD sales from last year, or at least not apples to apples in the calculation but last year's Nielsen Videoscan first alert Blu-ray unit marketshares were still probably biased high in favor of DVD as last year Walmart's Blu-ray share was lower that its DVD share.
    This year its much closer and will continue to be until the second half of the year when Walmart Blu-ray sales increased to get closer to its routine historical rate of 40% of DVD sales.
    The HMM Index numbers are not a day less, they are based on the Nielsen Videoscan first alert report which is the same Monday through Sunday range as the The-Numbers weekly report. Its only the revenue numbers (and now the cumulative unit numbers for the same period) that is off a day by being Sunday through Saturday.
     
  17. Kosty

    Kosty Supporting Actor

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    http://www.homemediamagazine.com/tks-take/era-rental-windows-has-arisen
    Here's a thought that some of the decline in DVD sales is the loss of sales of family related DVD sales as kids have more free entertainment options available to them in recent years.
    http://www.homemediamagazine.com/tks-take/are-apps-bane-kidvid
     
  18. Kosty

    Kosty Supporting Actor

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    Overall format revenues are not the only story for the studios and retailers

    Well we all have to realize that the metrics that we have access to in our discussions are really quite broad and expansive and are related mostly to revenues and not margins or profits.
    Revenues do not equal profits.
    Even if revenues or profits or units are lower in a consumer product category the category as a whole can still be hugely profitable even if its smaller than in years past.
    Lower overall revenues for OD packaged media sales can be concentrated in the lower margin less profitable segments. In this case, much of the OD decline since 2007 is from the lower revenues generated from older aging DVD catalog sales which is a result of lower retailer driven price points more so than volumes. Even with catalog sales for DVD since we still see those skus at retail, we know its still a profitable retail category even at those lower price points.
    DVD and Blu-ray as physical products are software and as software the cost in inherent in the intellectual property and not the physical production of the product. Pricing is market driven not production cost driven. As mass market software with many billions of dollars of annual consumer revenue, its still far more profitable than most consumer goods as a product category. Both DVD and Blu-ray will stay at retail as long as they are profitable to retailers and the studios even as revenues or margins decline over time.
    Gross indicators like format weekly, quarterly or annual revenues are not the entire story on the profitability of a consumer good like DVD or Blu-ray. We only have part of the story with those metrics.
    Factors like the exchange of higher margin skus like Blu-ray, BD+DVD+UV combos for plain DVD skus at lower price points may increase margins and profits for the same amount of units sold. Lesser amounts of Blu-ray or premium BD+DVD combo units sold could generate more profits overall than the same amount of lower priced DVD units iff the price premium per consumer unit sold exceeded the additional production cost, which it does.
    Retailer reductions in consumer price points are controlled by retailers for general price declines or occasional sales or loss leader pricing. Even if lower decline in price points lead to lower DVD revenues or a slow down in the growth of Blu-ray revenues compared to unit sales, that may effect retailer more than studios if wholesale prices are less effected.
    New releases are the most profitable packaged media segment. Higher Blu-ray margins mean more profits per unit sold than lower priced DVD unit sales, so Blu-ray units sold for new releases partially offset some overall unit declines. Some degree of less units sold at higher margin helps.
    Extension and some degree of sustainment of the higher margin new release revenue stream to an new generation of users for high definition next generation DVD Blu-ray is better than just letting DVD attrit by itself. Any level of Blu-ray new release sales extends that new release model for some time.
    Any level of Blu-ray catalog sales for additional resale of the studio library, even at lower levels than first hoped for, is additional found revenues for the studios from their library assets. Lower prices for Blu-ray catalog is still a good deal for consumers even if it studios gain less.
    Blu-ray revenues for both catalog or even new release does not have to match DVD's unique levels of magnitude to be both successful and sustainable for the longer term.
    Since 4Q 2010 retail price reductions for Blu-ray units sold at retail changed the equation between unit growth and overall revenue growth. Unit growth is more of a useful metric for understanding growth in consumer demand over time. For the 2011 over 2010 YoY growth period the 4Q 2010 price reductions meant that unit growth for the Q1-Q3 2011 period was moderated and muted somewhat it the translation into revenue growth. The amount of unit growth for Blu-ray sales for most of 2011 translated into less YoY revenue growth until about mid September. That affected the 2011 over 2011 overall YoY growth metric for Blu-ray. But that was also more of an impact on retailer margins than studio margins as retailers reduced prices for market conditions more than the wholesale prices were reduced which reflected studio margins and profits. Since last fall that factor has aged out and as long as Blu-ray retailer price points decline less, YoY Blu-ray unit sales gains will more effectively translate into revenue gains as well.
    As Blu-ray becomes more mature and volumes sold increase and replication capacity and yields increase normally over time, Blu-ray skus cost less to produce. Lower production costs for Blu-ray offset to some degree lower retail and wholesale pricing.
    Studios like Disney see higher household penetration of Blu-ray players steadily increase over time and effect growing marketshare for Blu-ray in all genres. Selling higher margin Blu-ray skus instead of lower margin DVD skus is a good thing for the studios and their retailer partners.
    Studios and the BDA see things like increased retailer support for Blu-ray and displacement of lower margin DVD skus with higher margin Blu-ray and BD+DVD combos in the retail space. Both in higher sales percentages for Blu-ray marketshare for evergreen titles and for new release shipments and initial sales. Increase in combo sales that replace DVD only inventory for post new release time frames for residual inventory help both the retailers and studios in inventory management by sku reduction but also still serve legacy DVD owner and new Blu-ray owners needs over time.
    Those are just some of the considerations that retailers and studios like Disney are aware of that may give the industry more optimistic feelings about Blu-ray that just looking at the raw gross top line metric of Blu-ray annual revenue rate of growth or the decline in DVD and OD sales at first glance may suggest.
    Finally, even if Blu-ray's growth is not as fast as hoped or DVD's decline was faster than anticipated its still a huge and highly profitable high margin revenue stream that the studios and retailers (who benefit less from digital cloud based options or rental alternatives) want to preserve for as long as possible.
    Plus as a home theater enthusiast, movie lover and consumer I like having Blu-ray as a high quality alternative for as long as possible and many people in the industry are enthusiasts, movie lovers and consumers too.
     
  19. Kosty

    Kosty Supporting Actor

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    I find it interesting as hell.
    I feel I had a great privilege to meet studio and consumer electronic company executives and other trade and industry folks during the format war years and have keep up many of those contacts to this day. So I feel a bit of responsibility to keep up the story updates over time.
    Having a marketing advertising and business background and being a home theater enthusiast and movie lover and consumer seeing this evolve over time as a business story for Blu-ray with a consumer product I love and enjoy is still neat.
    I like talking about this stuff.
    I like keeping track about this stuff as a hobby as well.
    A lot of what I do with the sales statistics and charts and graphs I do all the time on other much more boring stuff, so its a joy to do it on something I enjoy than something i have to do.
    For me, seeing Blu-ray mature and reach success after seeing it and HD DVD from the ground up and trivial level of sales back in 2006 is like watching something you cared about grow up and become successful over time. Its still fun.
     
  20. Kosty

    Kosty Supporting Actor

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    Blu-ray is doing best with new releases where the more concentrated profits and highest margins are. Much of the top line DVD and OD revenue decline is in the lowest margin catalog DVD sales segment. That's why the studios and retailers are in no hurry to abandon DVD and want to encourage Blu-ray usage for as long as possible as even in decline packaged media sales still are huge and profitable.
    But of course overall revenue decline is still a concern as revenue streams like cheap rentals are nowhere near as profitable to the studios.
    New release physical sell through is the most lucrative margins besides EST at high price points which has far lesser volumes.
    In general, Blu-ray 3D+DVD+UV combos have the highest margins of any physical home video product beside lower volume collector editions, then BD+UV combos, then Blu-ray new releases, DVD collector editions, DVD new releases, Blu-ray catalog titles, then older DVD releases.
    =================
    EDIT:
    The highest margins of all home video skus are in the limited edition collectors editions for Blu-ray and then DVD. But those are relatively limited runs and gross revenues. Multiple movie box sets and TV on Blu-ray and DVD box sets are also very high margin. All of those are pretty much subsets of the categories above in more general terms.
    ================
    EST prices generally have been in the past so high that they have had low much lower volumes than physical sell through and the studios need to adjust that for greater volumes along with selecting price points for UV.
    Blu-ray has been most successful in new releases where the highest margins for physical sell through remain along with the largest volumes on a per title basis. Blu-ray's success with new releases and its increasing marketshare has also resulted in a steady improvement over the past two years in the average disc cost sold for new releases to have actually increased since 4Q 2010. Consumers still buying new releases have increasingly migrated from plain DVD new release skus to more expensive and more profitable Blu-ray+DVD+DC combos and have not seemed to have discouraged by the average $5-$7 higher retail price points for the combos.
    Increasingly over the past year more and more consumers buying new or recent releases have started buying the even more premium priced Blu-ray 3D combos at even greater retail price and higher margins as well.
     

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