Blu-Ray movies cracked?

Discussion in 'Blu-ray and UHD' started by Pete T C, Dec 1, 2006.

  1. Pete T C

    Pete T C Second Unit

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2003
    Messages:
    299
    Likes Received:
    0
  2. Sam Davatchi

    Sam Davatchi Producer

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 1999
    Messages:
    3,150
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm looking forward to the region coding being removed. That should be the primary concern of the "hackers"! [​IMG]
     
  3. Shawn Perron

    Shawn Perron Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2002
    Messages:
    500
    Likes Received:
    0
    The thread title is totally misleading. Nothing has been "cracked". They are merely able to create an image of the data structure of the disc. If you read that article you linked to, you will see that the did this on a linux pc long ago.

    Having an image of the discs and actually doing something with them are 2 different things. If people remember back to DVD, it wasn't until CSS encryption was cracked, that we could even modify the data and still have a usable image. Getting an image of the discs not only was the easiest step, but probably one that Blu-Ray and HD-DVD made no attempt to prevent.
     
  4. Dave_P.

    Dave_P. Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    May 20, 1999
    Messages:
    983
    Likes Received:
    0
    LOL, An image like this is unplayable anyway since it's still encrypted. And here's the kicker: this anti-BD stuff actually hurts HD-DVD since, guess what, HD-DVD uses the same AACS encyption for copy-protection as BD does. Of course BD has an ADDITIONAL two layers of copy-protection on top of that, that HD-DVD does not have (a big reason for FOX's exclusivity), so when the AACS gets cracked HD-DVD's will be the first ones playable.
     
  5. ppltd

    ppltd Producer

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2006
    Messages:
    3,044
    Likes Received:
    0

    While this is not a major news story, is there anyone who actually thinks ths copy protection used on either BD or HD won't be cracked in a few months. There are hackers out there that live for the challange.

    Copy protection is about as useful in protecting content as just say no is to birth control. It all looks good on paper, but in the real world, it is meaningless.

    An extra two layers just means they will have to spend a couple of extra days cracking it.
     
  6. Shawn Perron

    Shawn Perron Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2002
    Messages:
    500
    Likes Received:
    0

    I'm not so sure about that. Encryption has reached a point where it's nearly impossible to brute force crack. I think it's far more likely they'll find a way to capture the data after the hardware has already decrypted it and before HDCP happens. I know that the Playstation Portable encryption has never really been cracked. They use the PSP hardware to decrypt the data, but do not have the capability of doing so without the PSP since they lack the decryption keys. The PSP was realsed 2 years ago, and the only reason it was compromised is because Sony left several exploits in the early firmware.

    In order for the HD formats to be "cracked" any time soon, someone making a hardware/software player is going to have to make a big mistake. This is why AACS includes the ability to lock out specific players. If a player is compromised, they can plug the hole by preventing future software from working in it.
     
  7. Mark Butler

    Mark Butler Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2001
    Messages:
    70
    Likes Received:
    0

    Personally, I don't believe that region encoding is the real reason why piracy exists for movies. It's either Hollywood's inability or simple disregard to think worldwide when it comes to releasing their product. Every area of the world has a different release date for a movie. Using Casino Royale as an example it was released starting on Nov 14 in London and its last release will be January 5th in Italy. That is almost a two month discrepancy between the first day a release and the last. And usually the DVDs are sometimes worse. I had the DVD of Capote from Amazon before it was released into theaters here (Japan). Episode 3 was even worse for me, Everywhere else in the world it was released either the same day or within one or two weeks of the US but in Japan it was July 9th. Hollywood seems to have this localized idea and ignores the fact that they are creating this problem by having such lengthy release windows for their movies both theatrically and home. There will always be people who want something for nothing but why give them an excuse. It is time for Hollywood to start thinking globally.
     
  8. TravisR

    TravisR Studio Mogul

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2004
    Messages:
    26,635
    Likes Received:
    3,804
    Location:
    The basement of the FBI building
    For Episode III (and probably all movies), the main problem in getting the movie out at the same time across the world was getting all the translations done in time. Japanese is apparently the toughest and that's why it took an extra long time between when most of the world got it and when it hit Japan.
     
  9. Mark Butler

    Mark Butler Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2001
    Messages:
    70
    Likes Received:
    0

    Actually, translations are begun as soon as the script is finished. The people that do the translation get almost the same amount of time, sometimes more, as the people who write the novelizations. Translating into Japanese is not anymore of a difficulty than translating into Chinese (released May 19 in both Cantonese and Mandarin) or Korean (May 26). The reason for Episode 3's late release is that they had a big premier for it with all the stars coming over. It was obviously the time when all their schedules coincided. If you look at the numbers for big Hollywood releases in China you can see that China used to have very late release dates for films. But as China is the MPAA's chief piracy enemy, more and more big releases are being released fairly close to the US release in an effort to combat piracy there. Warner Bros. in particular does this practice now with their DVD's, even releasing them before the US.
     
  10. TravisR

    TravisR Studio Mogul

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2004
    Messages:
    26,635
    Likes Received:
    3,804
    Location:
    The basement of the FBI building
    I don't know what to tell other than that I've heard multiple times that Episode III was harder to get done in time for Japanese release due to the translation.

    EDIT: Just for the record, I'm not saying that I'm right. I'm just saying that that's the info that I've heard.
     
  11. Mark Butler

    Mark Butler Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2001
    Messages:
    70
    Likes Received:
    0
    No, it was all marketing. NHK (the national TV broadcaster) even said that because one of the questions asked was why it took so long to come to Japan.
     
  12. JeremyErwin

    JeremyErwin Producer

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2001
    Messages:
    3,218
    Likes Received:
    0
    Region coding exists because it's easier to sell duplication rights piecemeal. Someone recently gave me a copy of Riget 1/2, two films released in 1994 and 1997. Before playing the discs, I had to alter my region code to "2".
     
  13. Mark Butler

    Mark Butler Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2001
    Messages:
    70
    Likes Received:
    0

    Region encoding was created to give the studios geographic control over DVD release dates and to help stop copyright infringement. It had nothing to do with selling the rights to do with duplication and everything to do with control of product. The DVD Forum originally wanted to make DVD region free but the studios balked at this because they thought it would lead to increased piracy. In fact the studios stance on region encoding has been taken court as an illegal practice against international trade laws set forth by the WTO. Court cases in New Zealand and Australia against this practice have been successful and DVD players in that area are sold as Region 0. The studios have somewhat seen the light in terms of region encoding with Blu-ray (only 3) and HDDVD (region free, so far) and have instead decided to concentrate all their efforts into strong arming the CE manufacturers into more and more draconian DRM (which has been discussed at great length on this forum).
     
  14. MarekM

    MarekM Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2006
    Messages:
    858
    Likes Received:
    0


    yeah, sure, are you going to change TOPIC NAME ? as mentioned, it's totaly misleading...

    Marek
     
  15. Sam Davatchi

    Sam Davatchi Producer

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 1999
    Messages:
    3,150
    Likes Received:
    0
    Also I just recently realized how HDCP is terrible in practice. I never thought of this. Now I can't surf to a TV channel for a second. As soon as I switch to TV, the BD player stops because there is no HDCP at the TV end! Extremely annoying!
     
  16. Ryan-G

    Ryan-G Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2005
    Messages:
    621
    Likes Received:
    1

    I dunno how accurate that is.

    I'm taking Japanese this semester(First year), and thus far I've found it an order of magnitude easier than German. Not counting the writing of course, that's so different from romanized it's very hard, but if you already know how to write it translating shouldn't be bad.

    But the actual language isn't all that bad. Especially since Japanese borrows quite a bit of modern words, like Computer and reform their sound a little to fit the language.

    Personally, I think German with all of it's possessives that mutate depending on the possesser is much more difficult.
     
  17. JeremyErwin

    JeremyErwin Producer

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2001
    Messages:
    3,218
    Likes Received:
    0
    blu-ray regions:
    Region A (1): U.S., Japan, Latin America, East Asia (except China).

    Region B (2): Europe and Africa

    Region C (3): China, Russia, Remaining countries.

    HD-DVD regions:

    none, as yet

    I suppose some of the things about DVDs would make more sense if CSS hadn't been totally eviscerated.
     
  18. Jeff Adkins

    Jeff Adkins Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 1998
    Messages:
    1,771
    Likes Received:
    15
    Real Name:
    Jeff Adkins

    Maybe...but I've yet to hear of anyone being able to copy a DVD-Audio disc. Those have been around for 4 years or so. Perhaps someone has cracked them, but I have never heard of it.
     
  19. Hartwig Hanser

    Hartwig Hanser Second Unit

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 1998
    Messages:
    300
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dito for SACD, as far as I know
     
  20. Radioman970

    Radioman970 Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2006
    Messages:
    6,878
    Likes Received:
    738
    Location:
    Could be anywhere
    Real Name:
    James Perry
    Can someone email me some blu-ray movies please. Pretty please. With Sugar on top. I'll be your friend. [​IMG]




    Joking of course.
     

Share This Page