Blu-Ray DVD integration with existing Bose Lifestyle 25

Discussion in 'Beginners, General Questions' started by -, Apr 26, 2010.

  1. Guest

    At long last, it's time to upgrade the home theatre experience. Those only part of the old system I want to save is the Bose Lifestyle 25, mostly because a) it's working well, and b) I long ago had the wires mounted above the ceiling for the rear speakers and changing those would be a pain.

    I'm going to buy a plasma tv this week; I've selected a Samsung PN58C590. I'll upgrade the cable box to whatever Comcast has for HD. And I'll replace the old DVD player with a new Blu-Ray, but got confused about whether I need "on board decoding". Is this something I need to connect my Bose Lifestyle 25 (Series I)?

    I think specs I've read say I need Profile 2.0, and if I can get wireless internet to it, that would be best so I don't have to run a cable. A lower budget Blu-Ray capable of 1080p that works with the Bose is what I'm looking for. Suggestions?
     
  2. Robert_J

    Robert_J Lead Actor

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    You have a Series I. Only the Series II has digital surround sound decoding. Neither Lifestyle 25 has multi-channel analog inputs so you don't need a Blu-ray with onboard decoding.

    Series I manual - http://products.bose.com/pdf/customer_service/owners/og_ls25_s1.pdf
    Series II manual - http://products.bose.com/pdf/customer_service/owners/og_ls25.pdf

    You would not need to change any wires if you wanted different rear speakers. You may need to change the connection to bare wire but that takes 30 seconds with a pair of wire cutters.

    If you read here a little more, you will find that we don't care for Bose that much. They claim and price themselves as a high end audio company when they have the quality of a Wal-Mart home theater in a box (HTiB). I suggest you upgrade to a real receiver and speaker system. That way you can get digital surround sound from both your new Blu-ray player and HD cable box. One with HDMI audio decoding will allow you to hear the new HD sound formats on Blu-ray discs.

    If you want to keep your Bose, any low cost player with wireless internet connectivity will work for you.
     
  3. Guest

    I read for a while before posting, so I'm well aware of the condescension toward Bose. My brother-in-law does the really high-end audiophile stuff (I changed the rubber stands that hold the speaker wires last time I was there; he wanted to see if that made a difference).

    But I already own the Bose and it's already installed. Unless you know of a new receiver that can beat the Bose on price (free!), then I'll stick with what I already have. When it dies, then I'll replace it.

    Thanks for the response about the onboard decoding, that helps a lot. And if you know of a blu-ray player with the wireless internet, that would be helpful, too.
     
  4. Robert_J

    Robert_J Lead Actor

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    A few Samsung models come with a wireless USB dongle. Some Insignia (Best Buy) models have built-in wireless. I'm sure others have similar features but I haven't looked at them. I picked my Samsung based on the on-board audio decoding and 7.1 analog outputs. I was surprised to find built-in wireless.

    Since you are going to stick with Bose, no other standard feature really matters. You will use the R/L analog audio outputs of the player to send analog audio to your Bose. You can get pretty detailed with other things though. My Samsung will stream Blockbuster, Netflix, Pandora and You Tube as well as connecting with my home network to stream personal content. Other players have additional streaming features or a USB port to connect an external hard drive. You could spend days researching that.
     
  5. Guest

    Well, looking through the Bose manual, I'm confused even more. I have 5 speakers so I was pretty sure I was getting surround sound, but I don't see how that happens if I bring in 2 analog signals to the unit.
     
  6. Robert_J

    Robert_J Lead Actor

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    You were getting matrixed surround sound. Dolby Pro Logic or something under the Bose name. The only way to get discreet 5.1 channel surround sound is with a digital connection. Your system does not have one.
     
  7. David Willow

    David Willow Babbling Idiot
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    To get digital sound you need a digital connection. The BOSE you have does not have a digital input. The best you can get is matrixed surround from the 2 channel source.

    Sometimes free is too much. I suggest you sell it on EBAY.
     
  8. genomovie

    genomovie Extra

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    Robert_J... "You will find that we don't care much for Bose here", Who is we?? you mean....you don't care for Bose. Sorry, but you don't speak for me.
     
  9. gene c

    gene c Producer

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    Then how about..."you won't find much support for Bose products on this forum."
     
  10. Joseph DeMartino

    Joseph DeMartino Lead Actor

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    Or, "You will find that the vast majority of serious home theater enthusiasts, on this and other forums, think that the Bose HT systems (we're not talking about Bose direct/reflecting stereo speakers, here) are a triumph of marketing over reality. That they are grossly overpriced for what you get, and technically inferior to systems costing much less. Cheaply constructed, their tiny speaker enclosures contain limited range speakers because that is all you can fit in such an enclosure, and their so-called bass modules - which are not subwoofers - are mostly there to supply the missing mid-range that the tiny satellites can't quite manage."

    Does that work better?

    Regards,

    Joe
     
  11. Guest

    I get it. Y'all don't like Bose.

    But none of you will convince my wife we should spend the money to replace it. :)
     
  12. Robert_J

    Robert_J Lead Actor

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    As an educated consumer who wants accurate sound at a good value, Bose does not fit the bill. The advertise that they are the be-all, end-all of quality. They are really the best marketing company in the world while being only average at building audio equipment. At one time Parts Express was selling surplus drivers from the Lifestyle systems for under $3 each. Combine that with a molded plastic enclosure and you are looking at speakers that cost at most $5 each. Compared to other speakers, they sound like they cost $5 each as well.

    Over the years we have probably been about 50% successful in convincing someone to switch to something else. Out of the people that switch, they are all happy. But the people that don't switch are happy as well because Bose does fit a niche market.

    In your situation you have to decide if you really want digital surround sound. If you do, we can help you with an upgrade path as well as tips on convincing the wife to go along with it. If you are satisfied with your current audio then we will drop the Bose talk and focus on Blu-ray players that will work with your goals. By the way, what are your goals other than internet connectivity?
     
  13. Joseph Bolus

    Joseph Bolus Cinematographer

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    To fully answer your question:
    1. You will only need to connect the analog audio L/R cables to your BOSE since it can't decode either Dolby TrueHD and/or DTS-HD MA. It also can't decode bitstream downconverted Dolby Digital 5.1 or DTS.

    2. When you hook-up your Blu-ray player in this fashion you may also want to go into the Audio section of the player's SETUP menu and change the PCM downconversion to "Surround Encoded" if your player allows that. (Most do.) This should provide for a better surround sound experience from your BOSE system.

    Nothing else will be required; but you won't be able to fully enjoy the discrete, lossless, digital surround sound afforded by the Blu-ray format.
     
  14. Guest

    Thanks, Joseph. While I appreciate the anti-Bose information, I came here looking for a blu-ray player. In all probability, we'll use it to record HD movies from Comcast to play later. The internet connectivity will be a toy for me to play with occasionally, but not necessary. Since the router is in an inconvenient room, wireless would be my choice. We probably won't use the Youtube or Netflix options, using the On-Demand features from Comcast instead.

    I'm leaning toward a Samsung because I like the quality of their products lately. I'm leaning toward the BD-C6500. It has built-in wireless, analog audio outputs, and USB ports my wife might use to display her thousands of pictures. If I can find a copy of their manual, I'll see if they have "Surround Encoded" and that will seal it for me.
     
  15. Guest

    From the BD-C6500 manual -

    Downmixing Mode
    ---------------
    Set whether to downmix the multi-channel audio into fewer channels.
    - Normal Stereo. Downmixes the multi-channel audio into two channel stereo. Choose when connected to equipment that does not support virtual surround functions such as Dolby Pro Logic.
    - Surround Compatible. Downmixes multi-channel audio into surround compatible stereo. Choose when connected to equipment that does supports virtual surround functions such as Dolby Pro Logic.


    Is that 2nd one the one you were talking about? A review of the Bose manual says it supports "Dolby Surround."
     
  16. Robert_J

    Robert_J Lead Actor

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    It is a PLAYER, not a recorder. I suggest a DVR from Comcast for recording and later playback.
     
  17. Robert_J

    Robert_J Lead Actor

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    The 2nd is correct. Instead of down mixing to generic stereo, it adds the appropriate phase cues to the signal so it is properly decoded by Dolby Pro-Logic surround sound.

    Samsung is very nice. I have the BD-P 3600.
     
  18. Guest

    Thanks, Robert, I'll go with the Samsung.
    And sorry for the confusion on the player. We use the DVR to record and later playback, but my wife occasionally records to DVD to archive for later... uh... oh. I had just assumed this records DVDs. It doesn't. Doh.

    And it doesn't appear any of the Blu-ray players record DVD in any format. Again doh. I suppose I can keep both the DVD-R and the Blu-Ray, but since we don't currently own any blu-ray discs, that doesn't make sense.

    We are definitely getting the Comcast HD DVR, but sometimes my wife wants to archive old Turner Classic movies, or some movie when we have young kids over. I don't know if it's possible to move a movie off of the DVR onto say, her laptop.

    It's starting to look like I'm keeping the old DVD-R. Bummer. First Old Bose, and now Old DVD-R.
     
  19. Robert_J

    Robert_J Lead Actor

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    It is possible to record from a DVR to a laptop but you will need the appropriate connections for audio and video as well as capture software and authoring software. Products like Nero have all the software you need. As you can see, a stand alone DVD recorder is much, much easier to use for occasional recordings.
     
  20. David Willow

    David Willow Babbling Idiot
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    Tivo is what you need. You can record and offload those recordings to your computer. You can burn the recordings to a DVDR on your computer (with the correct software). Tivo even sells the software (it is free to view on your computer, it costs a few dollars to burn/convert).
     

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