A Few Words About A few words about...™ The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (2011) -- in Blu-ray

Discussion in 'Blu-ray and UHD' started by Robert Harris, Mar 30, 2012.

  1. Robert Harris

    Robert Harris Archivist
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    There's nothing quite like a foreign hit with tremendous domestic potential for a U.S. re-make to bring out funding and talent, and TGwtDT is a perfect example.

    Budgeted at just below 100 million dollars, and with a worldwide gross currently at over 230 million, the film portends to be a financial winner once receipts from home video begin to roll in.

    One would presume that the new Blu-ray from Columbia / Sony would be a perfect match to the theatrical, and that presumption would be correct. Needle sharp, when necessary, with shadow detail and color also dead on, this is a gorgeous Blu-ray.

    But it should be. Data in. Data out.

    Shot on Red -- both Epic and Red One -- at over 4k resolution, and taken to a DI, also at 4k, http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003Y5H5HY/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=afewwordsabout-20&linkCode=as2&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B003Y5H5HYhttp://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=afewwordsabout-20&l=as2&o=1&a=B003Y5H5HY
     
  2. TravisR

    TravisR Studio Mogul

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    As with all of David Fincher's special editions, the extras are top notch. For my money, Fincher is the best filmmaker since the heyday of the great directors of the 1970's and having tons of footage of him working and talking about his work is going to be fascinating for film buffs in the coming decades (imagine if this much footage of Hitchcock or Kubrick at work existed).
     
  3. theonemacduff

    theonemacduff Second Unit

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    Absolutely agree with TravisR. One of the joys of the Panic Room DVD set was not so much the film (which is okay, but not, shall we say, for the ages), as it was the massive supplementary package, which told you everything you needed to know about how the film was made, including fascinating sidebars on such things as using Super 35 to best advantage, and the implications of using a two perf system as opposed to (I think) a three perf. As to that, Fincher noted that producers, of course, wanted him to use the two perf, because it was cheaper and you can hear the scorn for that decision in his voice as he says the words. I love Fincher's films (except maybe The Game, which I have only seen once, and which I thought had plot-hole problems; but maybe I should see it again), and absolutely love hearing him talking about his work.
     
  4. SeanAx

    SeanAx Stunt Coordinator

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    Allow me to chime in to agree with all that has been said above. David Fincher Blu-ray releases are perhaps the only discs that justify a purchase on the quality of the supplements ALONE. All of the discs over which Fincher has exerted creative control over the supplements provide thoughtful, in depth, articulate documentaries, featurettes, interviews and commentary tracks that tell more about the process of making a film, from both the creative and the practical (technical) aspects, than almost any other disc out there. (Peter Jackson's releases are in the same category.)
     
  5. JParker

    JParker Second Unit

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    I confess I've no interest in this particular film, with its rather sordid and brutal subject matter. However, if you are out in the ether somewhere, Mr. Harris, I've a question for you, although I've no idea if you've worked behind the camera but I suspect you know cinematographers. And my question is the art of lighting a lost art, that is the way painting with light was done in some of the classic black and white films of the 1930s and 1940s, and even color. I have seen the Criterion Collection Blu-ray of Fincher's Benjamin Button, and that looked like film.
    But do 21st century 'cameramen' have the knowledge of the late Jack Cardiff, whom you wrote about here:
    http://www.hometheaterforum.com/t/313883/a-few-words-about-cameraman-the-life-and-work-of-jack-cardiff-in-blu-ray
    To me the recent Oscar winner, The Artist, looked as if 1980s ILM blue screen photography were stripped of color: flat.
    I wonder your thoughts. It's not a digital versus film issue, I suspect, I wonder if Mr. Cardiff discussed the passing of his skills to future generations. I think the knowledge may be lacking. Of course true artistry is a gift that can't be taught. Do you see in any recent work skilled use of chiaroscuro, for example?
    Thanks.
     
  6. Robert Harris

    Robert Harris Archivist
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    It has little to do with digital vs. film.

    Every cinematographer that I have met or know, is a craftsperson.

    Every project is different.

    And one cannot compare Freddie Young's shafts of light, filtering their way through the apple barrel in Treasure Island (1950), to a multitude of new films, which are able to create an image with little or no light.

    Many DPs are still "lighting cameramen," be they men or women. But it is the project that creates the demands for the specific look.

    Do our current DPs know cinematography?

    Absolutely.

    They carry on a tradition, adding to the what came before, and taking away nothing, and adding.

    Constantly adding.

    To me, the cinematographers are the true heroes of film.

    RAH
     
  7. Robert Harris

    Robert Harris Archivist
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    I neglected to hit "chiaroscuro," which brings us back to the concept of painting with light.

    And I don't have an immediate answer for you. We can re-visit older films, especially those of Gordon Willis, like The Godfather, which are more of situation of taking away the light until you reach your goal.

    This is actually an interesting point of discussion, as it relates to newer films, and the abilities of various chips to capture light and dark.

    I'm going to have to reach out for answer.

    RAH
     
  8. JParker

    JParker Second Unit

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    Mr. Harris, I can't thank you enough for your kind reply, it made my day! :) I hope others see this thread or you can elaborate on a special new post for the forum.
    My best wishes,
    James
     
  9. JParker

    JParker Second Unit

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    One final thought (and I wish this thread was in the Cardiff Blu-ray post) -- I still think the older films have a beauty, no matter the method, that so many modern day films don't have. For example, even if the lighting is highly 'theatrical' Gone With The Wind and Rebecca and Queen Christina exemplify 'painting with light' in a fashion that recent films can't match (my opinion, naturally). Of course, you did mention The Godfather but that is so many years ago. But the CGI comic books obviously are an entirely different genre.
    Even Capra's Lady for a Day makes amazing use of light.
    http://www.hometheaterforum.com/t/319458/lady-for-a-day-blu-ray-review
    Well, anyone who has thoughts is welcome to contribute.
     
  10. Robert Harris

    Robert Harris Archivist
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    Interesting where the mind goes...

    Brought me to Freddie Young's work on Treasure Island (Disney), and Bobby Driscoll in the apple barrel.

    RAH
     
  11. Michel_Hafner

    Michel_Hafner Supporting Actor

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    Finally watched it. There is a scene where I saw what usually would be called a grading error, a grading inconsistency within a scene. Now, I know Fincher is a stickler for technical perfection. There are no grading errors in his films. So I wonder why he graded that way. Anybody know which scene I'm talking about?
     
  12. Dortmunder

    Dortmunder Auditioning

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    Is it the lesbian club scene?
    If so, the 'noise' was apparently deliberate on the part of the film makers, according to a discussion over on reduser.net with contributions from Ian Vertovec, the digital colour grader at Lightiron.
    Personally, I never noticed anything outstandingly distracting, either on the 4K theatrical screenings I saw, or on my blu- ray.
     
  13. Michel_Hafner

    Michel_Hafner Supporting Actor

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    No, grading issue, not noise. It's the scene where Craig goes to Skarsgard's house the first time and they drink something together. It's evening or night I think and lights are on in the room...
     

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