A Few Words About A few words about...™ Argo -- in Blu-ray

Discussion in 'Blu-ray and UHD' started by Robert Harris, Feb 28, 2013.

  1. TravisR

    TravisR Studio Mogul

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    I tend to think that it's not much different than it was, say, 50 years ago though. I doubt that kids in the early 1960's were interested in silent movies any more than kids today are interested in black and white movies. Generally, kids have always liked what is new and aren't concerned with what is 'old'. It's a relatively small number of people who were there or people who like things from many different eras that remember the past.
     
  2. MatthewA

    MatthewA Lead Actor

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    Other than the Walt-era Disney animated films, kids don't watch the older films because they aren't aware of them. And considering how much of what is marketed to kids probably shouldn't be (that Oogieloves movie, had anyone bothered to see it, was probably some form of mind control, and would probably send the message that it's okay to talk in movie theaters).
    Back then, there wasn't instant access to everything under the sun. There was TV (and old movies were staples of local TV stations' late night schedules for years because they were a cheap source of programming; remember The Late Late Show), but no home video and no Netflix. But there were also revival houses in many cities, and in the 1970s there was a huge wave of nostalgia for anything from the past; Happy Days, Laverne and Shirley, Little House on the Prairie, and The Waltons were all period pieces and all top-rated shows that are still in reruns today.
    There are people who are ignorant about this older stuff because it just doesn't interest them. But there are others who are interested in what the past had to offer as much as the present. As a non-representative example, my sisters watched their favorite animated Disney movies, both old and new, over and over again. I never could get them interested in the "deep cuts" of Disney, at least not to the extent I was, but they had their tastes and I had mine.
    Perhaps if we made rigorous music and art education mandatory in K-12 public schools, that would be a step in the right direction for the future. I had a very good music teacher in elementary school.
    I still don't know what any of this has to do with the movie Argo.
     
  3. Lromero1396

    Lromero1396 Supporting Actor

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    You missed Destry Rides Again and The Young Mr. Lincoln.
     
  4. Lromero1396

    Lromero1396 Supporting Actor

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    This seems to have turned into something resembling the "While we wait for a few words about...Lawrence of Arabia" thread.
     
  5. Lord Dalek

    Lord Dalek Cinematographer

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    I guess that's an improvement over a few words about Moonraker.
     
  6. Doctorossi

    Doctorossi Supporting Actor

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    Now that, I agree with (and Blade Runner is my favorite film!).
     
  7. Doctorossi

    Doctorossi Supporting Actor

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    Fair enough.
     
  8. Robert Crawford

    Robert Crawford Moderator
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    Some think Gladiator is a great film. IMO, I consider Black Hawk Down a great film and Thelma and Louise close to being one.
    Crawdaddy
     
  9. RBlenheim

    RBlenheim Agent

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    In my humble opinion, Ridley Scott is responsible for a number of great films: "Alien", "Blade Runner", "Thelma and Louise", "Gladiator", "Matchstick Men", and "Kingdom of Heaven" (uncut version), the latter, I think a masterpiece. Bob Blenheim PS: I forgot to name "Black Hawk Down", another great film by R. Scott.
     
  10. Brett_M

    Brett_M Screenwriter

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    I think Prometheus is a great film along with Gladiator and BHD. I also happen to love GI Jane. A critic once mused that a great film has at least 5 good scenes and no bad ones. That's my criteria.
     
  11. RBlenheim

    RBlenheim Agent

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    Although I really love Ridley Scott (and think even some of his misfires warrant cinematic attention), "G.I. Jane" is a mess. By the criteria by the 'critic' you name (actually it was director Howard Hawks who said it), the awful battle scenes in "G.I. Jane," with their inexplicable wiggling throughout, precludes that one, I think. I also think it would be hard to name even three good scenes in that one. I could name a dozen good scenes in most of Ridley Scott's great films I listed above.
     
  12. JoshZ

    JoshZ Second Unit

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    It was Howard Hawks who said that a good movie (not great, just good) must have "Three good scenes, no bad ones." Prometheus has virtually nothing but bad scenes.
     
  13. zoetmb

    zoetmb Stunt Coordinator

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    In the 1950s and 60s, many older movies, including silents (although very scratched and shown at the wrong frame rates) were played on television. So baby boomers remembered many of those films, regardless of whether they liked them or not. The same is true of classic cartoons. Even as a child, I "knew" that those films were "old" and many seemed archaic, but we didn't have a lot of choices and watched anyway. But I wound up also hearing a lot of the really great music in those cartoons and that always stayed with me. And as Elaine once said to Jerry, "it's a shame that everything you know about culture comes from a Bugs Bunny cartoon." Elsewhere in the forum, there was some postings about RKO's "Million Dollar Movie" TV series. In the late 50s and early 60's, I saw King Kong, Son of Kong and Godzilla endless times on that show, but also La Strada and Citizen Kane. Kids wouldn't watch the equivalent of that today because they have so many more choices, so they don't have to but the limitations of the time actually caused me to make better choices. In the late 60s and especially in the early 70s, there was a new appreciation for older movies, especially the silent comedians, on college campuses. That's when we had the big revivals and re-examinations of the works of Chaplin and Keaton, among others. That's when I first saw Metropolis, Greed, Un Chien Andalu and many great other early films. But today, home video has pretty much killed off the revival theatre, places like New York's Film Forum notwithstanding. The difference today IMO isn't so much that kids aren't interested. It's that there's no respect for older culture in any sense. One of the things that having hundreds of TV channels and virtual media does is teach kids that the culture is disposable. So we watch or listen to something and we move on. On the other hand, movie producers like to reach back to older culture because it's recognizable and in fact, it's difficult to get financing for any movie that doesn't already have a pre-sold title. And so any name or character that a baby boomer can recognize is rebooted because the marketers know that either the baby boomer will see it themselves or they'll take their kids or grandkids to see it. And thus we have, for better or worse, all the comic book movies, a new generation of Star Wars films coming, the current Oz prequel, etc. The other issue is that a culture must be taught and most people don't bother - they'll let their kids listen to or watch almost anything, especially if it's a brand. But in the case of my own grandkids, they are taught and we have watched "The General" together and she will tell you that her favorite composers are Woody Guthrie, George Gershwin and Charles Ives. So it is possible to instill culture and we have to stop being lazy about it.
     
  14. Brett_M

    Brett_M Screenwriter

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    Howard Hawks -- of course! I think I remember Roger Ebert quoting him in one of his book collections of reviews. We can agree to disagree about Prometheus. And GI Jane.
     
  15. SteveJKo

    SteveJKo Second Unit

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    You know in a general sense I’m sure that is very true. But the ‘60’s and ‘70’s were a very different time period than now, with a lot more overall awareness of classic Hollywood in the public’s collective consciousness.
    Matthew I think that’s the key. Old movies were all over TV. In 1979, for example, cable TV in my area meant you had your local affiliates, some stations from the nearest large city (in my case that was Boston) a few independent stations (the famous WOR) and if you wanted to pay for it, HBO. And that was it. Old movies were a great way of filling air time and you couldn’t change channel (rotating the dial) without going past one. Were kids “into” old movies? That depended on the young person. But kids were definitely aware of names like Humphrey Bogart, Clark Gable, Boris Karloff, Bette Davis, etc whether they’d seen their work or not.
    One old movie house in my area would present a lot of classics when not showing the latest independent film. My car would be packed with kids wanting to see an old movie the way it was meant to be seen, on the big screen. And these were not “film geeks” like me. Some were “jocks”, some were “freaks”, but whoever they were I never had trouble over filling my car for the trip to that theater. It was a time, shortly to end, when kids liked to be seen as knowledgeable and mature by the adults in their lives. Flash forward to the mid ‘80’s and, in a total reversal, adults would try and mimic “teen speak” in an effort to appear young and trendy.
     
  16. RBlenheim

    RBlenheim Agent

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    To say "Prometheus" has no good scenes, is a ludcrous and overwrought statement. Even if one doesn't like the total film, Scott's artistry gives us good scenes in even his bad films. It's such an overstatement that it reveals, respectfully, overreacting from one displaying his own personal bias against the film. I could name three great scenes in "Prometheus", but who cares? It's not going to make you like it any better, nor should it. You have a right to hold an opinion that dislikes the film, but let's quit the massive overstatement. Besides, when I name a few excellent scenes in a film that is not one of Scott's best (whether it's the opening scene of the alien humanoid plunging into the waterfall, Noomi Rapace's surgery scene, the last scene with the Alien making its appearance or whatever good scene one singles out), you'll just say they're bad scenes. Ridley Scott has no peer in designing visual sequences and building versimiltude in a science-fiction milieu. Even if the film has a weak plot and is a misfire. Okay, it's not a great film, and you don't like it. But it doesn't signify the fall of the art of film, or Scott's total incompetence. Bob Blenheim PS: I like the film. A lot. It's not "Alien" or "Blade Runner" but what is?
     
  17. Robert Crawford

    Robert Crawford Moderator
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    Do we have a difference in opinion here?
    Of course, we've seen this argument beforehand in the Prometheus thread with vocal naysayers of the film against those like myself that thought it wasn't a bad film.
    Crawdaddy
     
  18. JoshZ

    JoshZ Second Unit

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    I said the movie has "virtually nothing but bad scenes." As far as I'm concerned, the movie has one good scene, the part where David wanders around the ship alone at the beginning. Other parts of the movie may have striking visuals, but that doesn't make them good scenes. The guy in the rubber albino bodybuilder suit falling into the waterfall was laughable. The abortion scene was repugnant (and totally absurd on any sort of suspension-of-disbelief level). The last scene with the Xenomorph cameo felt tacked on and pointless, as all the obnoxious 'Alien' call-backs at the end of the movie did. Those are my opinions. You may have different opinions. Do I have a "personal bias against the film?" Only in that I went into it genuinely hoping to watch a good film, and instead sat through one of the worst pieces of crap I've seen in many, many years. So, yes, I have a personal bias against terrible movies.
     
  19. Robert Crawford

    Robert Crawford Moderator
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    Just tell us what you really think about the film?
    Crawdaddy
     
  20. Doctorossi

    Doctorossi Supporting Actor

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    That depends entirely upon your criteria for a scene. My interest in any scene extends as far as that scene supports an interesting and involving narrative, so for my purposes, Prometheus doesn't really have any "good" scenes. Without context, what are we even evaluating?
     

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