16:9 mode on a 4:3 set...

Discussion in 'Displays' started by Kevinkall, Feb 11, 2004.

  1. Kevinkall

    Kevinkall Second Unit

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    This is a silly question, but here goes...

    When watching a widescreen movie on a 4:3 set and 16:9 mode in enabled should there be two sets of black bars at the top and bottom of the screen? A set of bars for the TV and a set for the movie? I'm gueesing that this isn't right.
     
  2. Jeff Gatie

    Jeff Gatie Lead Actor

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    What you are seeing is the set's true black (the outside bars) vs. the incorrect rendering of the black bars on the DVD (the inside bars). You must be viewing a 2.35:1 aspect ratio film, which requires part of the black bars to be recorded on the DVD and the otheer part created by the 16:9 mode. Get a calibration disk and calibrate that display. Your rendered blacks should match the blacks generated by the 16:9 mode after this. Calibration will also give you a better picture and prevent any burnin (if you see two sets of bars, your contrast is probably off the map, which is bad for the set).
     
  3. Michael TLV

    Michael TLV THX Video Instructor/Calibrator

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  4. John S

    John S Producer

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    What ratio widescreen movie? If it is wider than 1.78:1 then you would have this. As indicated proper calibration will make it much less notice-able, if not completely eliminate it.

    Doesn't take professional calibration either, just properly setting your picture controls should minimize it or eliminate it entirely.
     
  5. Kevinkall

    Kevinkall Second Unit

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    I noticed this last night while watching Bad Boys 2 which is 2.40:1(Anamorphic Widescreen). I have went thru and setup my TV using the Sound & Vision setup disc. My contrast is set at 15/100.
     
  6. Michael TLV

    Michael TLV THX Video Instructor/Calibrator

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    Greetings

    Any program with an aspect ratio greater than 1.78 or less than ... will yield bars or one type or another ... whether top bottom or left right.

    You cannot fit a rectangle into a square box.

    Regards
     
  7. Kevinkall

    Kevinkall Second Unit

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    Really? [​IMG]

    I was unaware that I would be dealing with 2 sets of black bars.
     
  8. John S

    John S Producer

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    On anything wider than 1.78:1, just as somebody with a 16:9 set would have one set on such movies also.

    How notice-able is it? I can barely make out my native widescreen bars during like all black content.
     
  9. Michael TLV

    Michael TLV THX Video Instructor/Calibrator

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    Greetings

    "You have taken your first steps into a larger world."

    If you set your DVD player to 4:3, you will only have one set of black bars ... (bad idea)

    Regards
     
  10. Todd K

    Todd K Second Unit

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    I asked this question a while back:

    http://www.hometheaterforum.com/htfo...hreadid=124601

    Seems no one could really give a definitive answer. Should the black bar produced by that section being "off" be the same as the thin black bar being produced by the DVD?
     
  11. John S

    John S Producer

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    Interesting, I know when I am in complete dark, I can barely make out my native widescreen bars. There are so many bars going on these days, I guess I just chalk it all up to modern times,
     
  12. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    If your primary goal is to eliminate the distinction between the black area outside the 16:9 shaped area on the screen being used for the video frame and the black area outside the 2.35:1 (or whatever) area used for the movie picture, you can adjust the brightness control while watching the movie. This is not necessarily a correct calibration.

    To introduce some confusing numbers, the luminance data range on DVD is 0 to 255 where 16 is black and 235 is white and what is outside this range is normally not used. Occasionally the movie may have shadow detail between 0 and 15 while the black bar outside the 2.00:1 or 2.35:1 picture is at level 16. So trying to match the inner black bar to the outer black bar will bury this "blacker than black" picture detail.

    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     

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