1080/24 not what I expected.

Discussion in 'Playback Devices' started by Oswald Pascual, Jul 9, 2009.

  1. Oswald Pascual

    Oswald Pascual Second Unit

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    I have read a lot of the advantage of 1080/24 and seen this transalate into some beautiful images on blu-ray titles, however when I upscale my standard DVD's to 1080/24 I see flaws. I now upscale my SD-DVD's to 1080/60 and find the image looks much better. On paper it would seem that 1080/24 should be the way to go but it does not appear that way to me with my upsacling player.

    Does this make sense or maybe I have some setting off somwhere?
     
  2. Kevin. W

    Kevin. W Screenwriter

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    Bluray is recorded in 24p so when it is pulled of the disk there is minimal reprocessing. I don't believe regular DvD's are recorded in 24p, so your going to end up with extra processing to display the image which could lead to artifacts. Also does your tv accept 24p?
     
  3. Stephen Tu

    Stephen Tu Screenwriter

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    Depends which player. 1080p24 is much easier with most Blu-rays since that's what the disc itself is, you just need decoder chip which can output at that rate. DVD is all 480i60 so it's trickier, you have to do reverse telecine to pull out the original 24 frames, which can be tricky if there are bad flags/bad edits etc. in the encoding. Some players will handle this better than others. Even TV itself could do better, depending on its video processing.

    Also for any video sourced material (many live concerts, sports, TV shows shot on video rather than film), you'd definitely not want to use 24 fps.
     
  4. Leo Kerr

    Leo Kerr Screenwriter

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    Oddly enough, if the flaws are what I think they are, it's not always "old" releases that are bad. The SD-DVD for Slumdog Millionaires had a lot of "torn" frames played back at 24p. Yet some "not"-special editions and old catalog titles play back beautifully.

    Now, granted, some of the frames are "torn" because of the actual edits on the negatives.

    Leo
     
  5. RoboCop

    RoboCop Auditioning

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    Wouldn't it depend on the DVD as well?

    Some are authored which each alternating half-image once, and leave it to the player (and flags) to produce the 3/2 sequence. Others are "hard progranmmed" with 2 half-images (each the same), followed by 3-half images (each the same).

    Arguably an upconversing player would have more problems potentially with the second type.


    L.
    (spd)
     
  6. Stephen Tu

    Stephen Tu Screenwriter

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    The issues with 24p playback are pretty much the same as for progressive playback. The following article is very detailed & informative about the issues involved & what can go wrong:
    http://www.hometheaterhifi.com/the-dvd-benchmark/177-dvd-benchmark-part-5-progressive-scan-dvd.html

    The half-images are odd lines/even lines of the same frame of film. Some players would have problems with what you referred to as "hard programmed", but others would not (read the article about "cadence" based deinterlacing).
     
  7. Ernest

    Ernest Supporting Actor

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    I am seeing the opposite when I play SD DVD's on my Momitsu. The player is doing a great job up converting and the video looks terrific on my Sony Bravia (52") LCD. The only SD DVD's I repurchased the BluRay version were those in letterbox or flippers. (Good Will Hunting, Pelican Brief, A Time To Kill, Boys From Brasil, etc.). I am moving forward and most of the DVD's I purchase now are BluRay. Because of the cost difference I will continue to purchase some SD versions for dramatic movies like The Reader.
     

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