100W @ 6 Ohm vs 100W @ 8 Ohm

Discussion in 'AV Receivers' started by TheseusOfAthens, Aug 30, 2013.

  1. TheseusOfAthens

    TheseusOfAthens New User

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    Hi,

    I'm looking to upgrade from a Kenwood VR-401 5.1 A/V Receiver to something more modern. I've

    been putting an unnatural amount of research into the latest receivers and I narrowed my selection

    down to the Sony STR-DN1040.

    This receiver seems to be perfect for me with 7.1 channels, built-in wifi, Airplay, plenty of HDMIs, and

    a beautiful on-screen display. The only problem is that the official specs rate it at 165W x 7 @ 8 ohms

    1kHz 0.9% THD 1ch. driven while the Kenwood is listed as 100W x 5 @ 8 ohms 20- 20kHz 0.7% THD

    2ch.

    My 100W 8 Ohm speakers sound beautiful paired with the Kenwood receiver so loosing sound quality

    when I upgrade is a HUGE con.

    I downloaded the Sony STR-DN1040 manual and it said that the receiver can also run at 100W x 7 @

    6 ohms 20- 20kHz 0.9% THD 2ch. I know running this would be better given the frequency range.

    The BIG question here is wether or not there's a difference in sound quality running in the 6 Ohm

    range vs the 8 Ohm range.

    Thanks for the help, hopefully this is going to give me some peace of mind.
     
  2. schan1269

    schan1269 HTF Expert
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    The "ohm range" is not a user selectable thing. It is based on the speakers.

    Also ohm load is not a constant. It could be 4ohm at 150hz and 12ohm at 10k.
     
  3. TheseusOfAthens

    TheseusOfAthens New User

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    I guess I should rephrase my question.

    Does a receiver that uses the 100W @ 8 Ohms spec sound better than a receiver using the 100W @ 6 Ohms spec?

    Is the difference in sound quality so minute that it doesn't make a difference?
     
  4. schan1269

    schan1269 HTF Expert
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    How a manufacture calculates(or, misrepresents) their power is meaningless in terms of sound quality. It is nothing more than how much power is there.

    Your speakers themselves determine 90% of everything sound related.

    It also helps to know how power and volume work. As "total power" is typically meaningless.

    A speaker that produces 92db of sound at 1 watt...

    Requires around 1/8th of 1 watt to produce enough volume to hear it(typical general listening is done around 85db)

    "Rocking out" is around 95 db. So you are sending 2 watts to your speakers.

    Annoying your neighbors and making yourself go deaf is 100db. Which would require around 8 watts.

    Adjust those numbers as you need for various inefficient speakers(as low as 85db) and super efficient speakers(95db and above).
     
  5. gene c

    gene c Producer

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    Bottom line...how a manufacturer decides to rate their receivers power outpt (4 ohm, 6 ohm, 8 ohm, whatever) has nothing to do with how your speakers will sound.

    A receivers SQ has more to do with it's DAC's, DSP chip and the quality of it's amp section (as well as an room crrection software). Nothing wrong with vintage gear. I just sold an Adcom GFR-700. Massive power supply (168 x 5 @ 8 ohms) and very sweet sounding but very basic by todays standards and difficult to live with. But I miss it already.
     
  6. Mr645

    Mr645 Stunt Coordinator

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    Botton line is that neither receiver will come close to delivering 100 wpc under normal conditions.

    Theoretically the amp that can deliver 100 wpc into 8 ohm will be slightly more powerful then one that can only deliver 100 watts into a 6 ohm load. However power has little to do with sound quality.

    Manufacturers do things like rate it at 1khz instead of a full 20-20k range, or allow up to .9% THD in this case instead of a typical .01%

    100 wpc 2 channels driven into 6 ohm at 1khz is like measuring the top speed of a car, going down a hill, with a strong tail wind

    I am not familiar with the Sony STR-DN1040 in any way, but I am guessing that at $600 they seem to be selling for, you can do a lot better.
     

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