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    Friday the 13th: The Complete Collection Blu-ray Review

    Blu-ray Warner

    Oct 05 2013 04:00 AM | Ken_McAlinden in DVD & Blu-ray Reviews
    Friday the 13th: The Complete Collection takes advantage of the Warner Home Video distribution deal for Paramount catalog titles to compile the most comprehensive collection of films in the franchise to date. The set includes twelve films spread across nine Blu-ray discs with copious special features, an additional bonus SD DVD carried over from the 2004 Paramount box set, and a handful of physical extras in deluxe packaging. While this will be more than enough Jason Vorhees mayhem to satiate most fans, it frustratingly omits certain previously available elements that cause it to come up short of definitive for the hardest of hardcore fans of the series.

    Title Info:

    • Studio: Warner Brothers
    • Distributed By: N/A
    • Video Resolution: 1080P/AVC, 1080P/VC-1
    • Aspect Ratio: 1.78:1, 2.40:1
    • Audio: English 1.0 DD (Mono), English 5.1 Dolby TrueHD, English 5.1 DTS-HDMA
    • Subtitles: English SDH, Spanish, French, Other
    • Rating: Not Rated, R
    • Run Time: Various
    • Package Includes: Blu-ray, DVD
    • Case Type: Deluxe packaging with disc-sleeved book inside hinged tin case
    • Disc Type: BD50 (dual layer), DVD-9 (dual layer)
    • Region: A, 1
    • Release Date: 09/13/2013
    • MSRP: $129.95

    The Production Rating: 2.5/5

    All films are presented in their R-rated US theatrical cuts unless specifically mentioned below:

    Disc 1:

    Friday the Thirteenth (Paramount - 1980 - 95 Minutes)

    Directed by: Sean Cunningham

    Starring: Betsy Palmer, Adrienne King, Jeanine Taylor, Robbie Morgan, Kevin Bacon

    This is the one that started it all. In concept, the movie is something like John Carpenter's Halloween from 1978 with a significant bump up in the number of teenagers in the crosshairs of its serial killer . Director Sean Cunningham blends imaginative low budget gore, suspense, and, more so than most of the sequels, mystery, into a crowd pleasing teen slasher film with a couple of memorable twists in its final reel. This is the same disc that was released in 2009, and includes the uncut version of the film which is less than thirty seconds longer than the R-rated theatrical version and includes some additional graphic seconds during some of the "kill" scenes.

    Disc 2:

    Friday the Thirteenth Part 2 (Paramount - 1981 - 87 Minutes)

    Directed by: Steve Miner

    Starring: Amy Steel, John Furey, Adrienne King, Kirsten Baker, Stuart Charno, Warrington Gillette

    With this quickly assembled sequel directed by Steve Miner, audiences were largely treated to more of the same, although this second entry in the series features the true introduction of the Jason Vorhees that would go on to become a slasher icon.

    Disc 3:

    Friday the 13th Part 3 in 3D (Paramount - 1982 - 95 Minutes)

    Directed by Steve Miner

    Starring: Dana Kimmell, Paul Kratka, Tracie Savage, Jeffrey Rogers, Catherine Parks, Larry Zerner, David Katims

    For this third sequel, the formula remains intact, and while it is getting a bit tired, the ante is upped by some outrageous kill scenes, many of which are designed to exploit the 3D process in which the film was shot. This also marks the first point in the series where Jason Vorhees dons the iconic hockey mask that would become his signature.

    Disc 4:

    Friday the 13th The Final Chapter (Paramount - 1984 - 91 Minutes)

    Directed by: Joseph Zito

    Starring: Kimberly Beck, Peter Barton, Corey Feldman, Erich Anderson, Crispin Glover, Clyde Hayes, Barbara Howard, Lawrence Monoson

    Far from the final chapter, this fourth film in the series picks up where the third film left off, with Jason's body on its way to the local morgue. He does not stay there for long, however, and eventually works his way back to the woods where a group of horny partying teenagers provide fodder for his favorite pastime. This film is elevated somewhat by the performance of Corey Feldman as Tommy, a creepy kid who lives with his Mom and Sister in a house next to the cabin where the teenagers are partying. Of the teenagers, Crispin Glover stands out with a quirky but relatable portrayal of an awkward boy named Jimmy. The return of Tom Savini also ups the quality gore ante quite a bit from the first two sequels.


    Disc 5:

    Part V: A New Beginning (Paramount - 1985 - 91 Minutes)

    Directed by: Danny Steinmann

    Starring: Melanie Kinnaman, John Shepherd, Richard Young, Marco St. John, Juliette Cummins, Carol Locatell

    This entry follows the character of Tommy (John Shepherd as a teenager and Corey Feldman in a prologue sequence) several years after the traumatic events of the fourth film. He enters a home for troubled teens located in a remote wooded area where a masked killer begins murdering patients, staff, and local residents in a very Jason Vorhees-style way. Credit to Director Danny Steinmann for taking some chances and bringing back an element of mystery that had been missing since the first film, but a lack of "The Full Vorhees", and a ham-handed handling of the mystery that tips off viewers to the true killer very early in the proceedings caused a number of fans to protest. The film's conclusion seems to set-up a new and potentially promising direction for the series, but it was completely ignored/abandoned in subsequent sequels.

    Part VI: Jason Lives (Paramount - 1986 - 87 Minutes)

    Directed by: Tom McLoughlin

    Starring: Thom Matthews, Jennifer Cooke, David Kagan, Renée Jones, Kerry Noonan, Darcy DeMoss, Tom Fridley, Alan Blumenfeld

    The sixth entry in the series finds a grown Tommy still obsessed with Jason Vorhees. An ill-fated exhumation at Jason's grave site and a coincidental lightning strike get Jason back on his feet and into the serial killing business again. Director Thom McLoughlin endeared himself to a number of fans by bringing back the Jason Vorhees they knew and loved, but may have confused just as many by introducing a deliberate comic tone to the proceedings. While some elements are amusing such as the attempts by the locals to re-brand Crystal Lake out of its infamous past, It is hard to feel much sympathy for Jason's bumbling comic victims in this entry. An attempt to regain some of the deflated suspense by bringing two cabins of young kids to the camp misfires as well.

    Disc 6:

    Friday the 13th Part VII The New Blood (Paramount - 1988 - 88 Minutes)

    Directed by: John Carl Buechler

    Starring: Jennifer Banko, John Otrin, Susan Blu, Lar Park-Lincoln, Terry Kiser, Kevin Spirtas, Susan Jennifer Sullivan, Heidi Kozak, Kane Hodder

    The reductionist take of this movie is "Jason vs. Carrie", and since the film does not do much to suggest that it wants to rise above a reductionist take, it is pretty apt. Lar Park-Lincoln plays a troubled teen with untapped telekinetic abilities who makes a psychic connection to a substantially decomposed serial killer at the bottom of Crystal Lake. It ends badly for a lot of teenagers. This film features some of the worst acting in the whole film series, with only Lar Park-Lincoln and (in a mute performance with heavy prosthetics) Kane Hodder distinguishing themselves in any way.

    Friday the 13th: Part VIII: Jason Takes Manhattan (Paramount - 1989 - 100 Minutes)

    Directed by: Rob Hedden

    Starring: Todd Caldecott, Tiffany Paulsen, Tim Mirkovich, Kane Hodder, Barbara Bingham

    In a case of over promising and under-delivering, this bottom scraping last sequel from Paramount takes place primarily on a ship bound from Crystal Lake to Manhattan and spends comparatively little time in The Big Apple itself. The screenwriters barely even try, assembling the least memorable group of characters in the history of the series with the possible exception of veteran character actor Peter Mark Richman as the insufferable teacher in charge of the teenagers on the ship. He is so unlikeable and humorously wrong about everything that viewers cannot wait to see him dispatched by Jason.

    Disc 7:

    Jason Goes to Hell: The Final Friday (New Line - 1993 - 87 Minutes)

    Directed by: Adam Marcus

    Starring: John D. LeMay, Kari Keegan, Allison Smith, Kane Hodder, Steven Williams, Steven Culp, Erin Gray, Rusty Schwimmer, Billy Green Bush

    After turning out eight films over the course of nine years, Paramount handed the reins of the Jason Vorhees franchise over to New Line Cinema with original Friday the 13th Director Sean Cunningham on board as a producer. This first entry from New Line begins with a twist with Jason being ambushed and cut down by a military assault squad. His essence remains in the heart of his corpse which begins jumping from carrier to carrier, possessing them and turning them into slow moving serial killers. Steven Freeman (LeMay) learns from a bounty hunter (Williams) that body-snatching Jason is specifically targeting Vorhees family members to facilitate his resurrection and prevent his permanent demise. Steven's motivation to foil body-snatching Jason's plans is greatly enhanced when he learns that Jessica Kimble (Keegan), the estranged mother of his infant daughter, is Jason's niece and closest living relative.

    New Line's first foray into the franchise tries so hard to mess with the formula that it barely winds up feeling like a Friday the 13th movie at all. The mythology and plot complications are laid on thick but to little effect, resulting in one of the busiest and least interesting films in the series for dedicated fans. One bright spot is the gruesome effects work by KNB, which is somewhat muted by the quick cutaways of the R-rated cut made available on this release.


    Jason X (New Line - 2002 - 91 Minutes)

    Directed by: James Isaac

    Starring: Kane Hodder, Lexia Doig, Lisa Ryder, Chuck Campbell, Jonathan Potts, Peter Mensah, Melyssa Ade, David Cronenberg

    With the Freddy vs. Jason feature everyone expected lingering in "Development Hell" and a nine year gap since the last Jason Vorhees film, New Line decided to take the franchise to the future, contriving a plot where Jason is cryogenically frozen and awakened centuries later aboard a starship where he resumes his killing spree. Viewers are reminded of the debt the original film owed to Ridley Scott's Alien as well as John Carpenter's Halloween. The film's TV style digital effects are made palatable by a game cast and a macabre sense of humor that seems to work better in this film than in Part VI - Jason Lives. It ain't art, and it is not even one of the best films in the franchise, but it is modestly enjoyable on its own B-Movie terms.

    Disc 8:

    Freddie Vs. Jason (New Line - 2004 - 97 Minutes)

    Directed by: Ronny Yu

    Starring: Robert Englund, Ken Kirzinger, Monica Keena, Jason Ritter, Kelly Rowland, Christopher George Marquette, Brendan Fletcher, Katharine Isabelle

    More than a decade after everyone expected it, New Line and Warner finally put this boogie man rumble feature into theaters. The plot, such as it is, involves Freddy, powerless in Hell, releasing Jason on the children of Elm Street who have robbed Freddy of his powers by forgetting about him. Once Jason accumulates a body count, talk of Freddy Kreuger resumes and his ability to cross over into their dreams is restored. A group of teenagers in the crosshairs of both monsters seize an opportunity to pit them against each other while discovering a conspiracy amongst the adults in the town that explains how they were able to forget about Freddy. The film was very commercially successful, but does not quite live up to the decade of hype that preceded it. The plot feels both flimsy and unnecessarily complicated at the same time, and the battles between Jason and Freddy deflate their initial appeal by becoming boringly protracted.

    Disc 9:

    Friday the 13th (New Line/Paramount - 2009 - 98 Minutes [Theatrical Cut], 105 Minutes [Killer Cut])

    Directed by: Marcus Nispel

    Starring: Jared Padalecki, Danielle Panabaker, Amanda Righetti, Travis Van Winkle, Aaron Yoo, Derek Mears, Jonathan Sadowski, Julianna Guill, Ben Feldman, Arlen Escarpeta, Ryan Hansen, Willa Ford, Richard Burgi

    This franchise re-boot takes the basic dead teenager formula established in the early films in the franchise, wraps it up in the iconic elements established over the first three films, and applies a modern sheen. This does not exactly result in a modern classic, but it does manage to rise above must of the sequels from the previous two decades. It does so by jettisoning all of the plot and mythology baggage accumulated over repeated attempts to continue a story that really just wants to stay simple. Acting is way above par for the series. Of course, viewers purchasing tickets to a Friday the 13th film are not looking for award worthy performances as much as for creative stalk/scare/kill sequences, and the film delivers in that respect. This modern re-imagining of Jason Vorhees is a bit more sadistic and a good deal less efficient than the original, which I think is a mis-step. "My" Jason Vorhees may be a sadistic stalker, but he is always a quick killer. In this film, he subjects some of his victims to elaborately protracted deaths. This disc includes both the 98 minute Theatrical Cut and an extended 105 minute "Killer Cut", which features some brief alternate plot threads and a little more sex and violence but still received the same "R" rating as the Theatrical Cut.
    Friday the 13th Playlist from Warner Bros. Entertainment


    Video Rating: 3.5/5 3D Rating: 1/5

    All films are presented in 1080p high definition transfers encoded with the AVC codec with the exception of Freddy vs. Jason which is encoded using the VC-1 codec. Friday the 13th Part 3, Freddy vs. Jason, and Friday the 13th (2009) are appropriately letterboxed to a 2.4:1 aspect ratio reflecting their theatrical presentations.

    Produced over the course of three decades, the films reflect a variety of film stocks and budgetary constraints. Most of the titles in this collection are translated well into the high definition video realm, looking as films from their era should with minimal video encoding artifacts. Exceptions are noted below:

    The anaglyph 3D presentation of Friday the 13th Part 3 looks terrible, as is the case for all anaglyph 3D. The regular flat presentation is well-rendered, but the scenes obviously designed for 3D gags can be distracting.

    Friday the 13th: The Final Chapter looks quite good for most of its running time, but one particular sequence involving characters struggling to get away from Jason in a basement is timed too dark to read the on-screen action. This is an isolated incident, as the film features many other dark sequences with excellent shadow detail.

    Friday the 13th: Part VI - Jason Lives looks noticeably softer than its predecessors for reasons that are unclear.

    Friday the 13th Part VIII - Jason Takes Manhattan - looks softer and of higher contrast than its predecessors. This may be a result of a film source that is a generation or two down from the others, a post-production push in the exposure to get the intended level of darkness, or other unspecified reasons, but it appears to be an issue with the element used for transfer more so than an artifact of the transfer itself.

    Audio Rating: 4/5

    Every film in this collection is given a lossless multichannel encoding. Friday the 13th (1980), Friday the 13th Part 2, Friday the 13th Part 3, and Friday the 13th (2009) feature 5.1 Dolby TrueHD encoded soundtracks. Freddie vs Jason features a 6.1 DTS-HD MA encoded soundtrack. All other titles feature 5.1 DTS-HD MA encoded soundtracks.

    Parts 1-5 were originally presented in mono, but only Parts 1-3 include the original soundtracks as well as the 5.1 remixes. The 5.1 mixes generally add a stereo presence to the music track with only modest stereo separation for sound effects. The 6th through 9th films in the series were released theatrically with stereo soundtracks, and the 5.1 remixes do not take many liberties to bump up the LFE support or to add conspicuous split stereo surround effects. Staring with Jason X, the films were released theatrically with multichannel stereo soundtracks, and the mixes on disc reflect more aggressive use of the full surround field.

    For Parts 4-8 and Jason Goes to Hell, listeners seeking some indication of what the original mixes were like will have to settle for some of the foreign language dub tracks.

    Special Features: 4/5

    All extras are in 1080p HD with Dolby Digital 2.0 audio unless otherwise indicated below.

    Friday the 13th (1980)

    Commentary by Director Sean S. Cunningham with Cast and Crew is a track hosted by author and Friday the 13th aficionado Peter Bracke featuring separately recorded comments from Cunningham and a nice cross section of people involved with the film's production including Betsy Palmer ("Pamela Vorhees"), Adrienne King ("Alice), Screenwriter Victor Miller, and Composer Harry Manfredini. This was created for the 2009 release.

    Friday the 13th Reunion (16:45) A group interview featurette created for the 2009 release

    Fresh Cuts: New Tales from Friday The 13th (14:08) features additional stories about the films production from the same set of 2009 interviews

    The Man Behind The Legacy: Sean S. Cunningham (8:59) another 2009 featurette focusing on Cunningham and the importance of the film to his career.

    Lost Tales from Camp Blood - Part 1 (7:31) is the first in a series of six original slasher themed shorts (think "webisodes") spread across the extras for the first six films in the series.
    The Friday the 13th Chronicles (4:3 SD - 20:34) is chapter one from the series of featurettes first appearing on the "Killer Bonus" DVD for the 2004 "Crystal Lake to Manhattan" box set of all of the 80s Paramount films in the series. This is redundant as that disc is also included in this box set, but convenient if one is only interested in the first film and does not want to switch discs.
    Secrets Galore Behind the Gore (4:3 SD - 9:33) also repeats from the 2004 "Killer Bonus" DVD

    Theatrical Trailer (2:34)

    Friday the 13th Part 2

    Inside “Crystal Lake Memories” (11:16) is a 2009 featurette in which Peter Bracke, author of the book of the same name, discusses the film series.

    Friday’s Legacy: Horror Conventions (6:50) is a 2009 featurette that gives a glimpse into the "Scarefest" horror themed convention.

    Lost Tales from Camp Blood - Part II (8:55) is the second in the series of 2009-produced original slasher shorts

    Jason Forever (4:3 SD video - 29:28) Covers a convention panel appearance by four actors who have played Jason Vorhees in films (Kane Hodder, Ari Lehman, Warrington Gillette, and CJ Graham). The panel is moderated by Bracke.

    Original Theatrical Trailer (1080p - 2:13)

    Friday the 13th Part 3

    Fresh Cuts: 3D Terror (12:53) is a 2009 featurette in which Peter Bracke discusses the decision a to use 3D for the film, some technical background on how it was shot, and some alternate ideas for plot and endings that were considered for the second sequel.

    Legacy of the Mask (9:34) is another 2009 featurette in which Bracke provides a history of the many looks of Jason Vorhees with special attention given to the iconic hockey mask he first dons in Part 3.

    Slasher Films: Going for the Jugular (7:10) is a 2009 featurette looking at the slasher genre as a whole beyond just the Friday the 13th movies.

    Lost Tales from Camp Blood - Part III (4:50) The third entry in this collection of original horror shorts from 2009.

    Original Theatrical Trailer (2:10)

    Friday the 13th - The Final Chapter

    Under the heading of "Commentary" are two full length commentaries carried over from the 2009 Deluxe Edition DVD.

    Commentary by Director Joseph Zito, Screenwriter Barney Cohen and Editor Joel Goodman is an informative track looking at technical and creative aspects of the film's production as well as financial and censorship challenges faced in bringing it to fruition.

    Fan Commentary by Adam Green and Joe Lynch is more or less an extended appreciation of the film from horror fans and filmmakers Adam Green and Joe Lynch. They introduce just enough irreverence to make it bearable, but viewers will likely not listen to this track more than once.

    Under the heading of “Behind the Scenes” are the following featurettes:

    The Friday the 13th Chronicles, Part IV (4:3 SD - 13:16) The Part IV entry from the 2004 series of "Chronicles" featurettes. This is repeated on the "Killer Bonus" DVD.

    Secrets Behind The Gore - Tom Savini on Part IV (4:3 SD - 13:30) Another carryover from the 2004 release, this is also repeated on the "Killer Bonus DVD"

    Lost Tales from Camp Blood – Part 4 (1080p - 6:22) The fourth entry in this series of original horror featurettes from 2009.

    Jason’s Unlucky Day: 25 Years After Friday the 13th: The Final Chapter” (1080p - 11:03) is a retrospective featurette featuring interviews with cast and crew that was created for the 2009 Deluxe Edition of the film. It gives a succinct if too brief overview of the film's production.

    “The Crystal Lake Massacres Revisited” (18:10) A 2009 featurette that incorporates the events of the film into a faux news documentary.

    “Jimmy’s Dead Dance Moves” Featurette (2:09) Two minutes of Crispin Glover dance move outtakes previously included with the 2009 special edition DVD. Title expletive deleted from the disc menu for those of you familiar with the name Jimmy is repeatedly called in the film.

    Under the heading of “Deleted Scenes” are the following featurettes, both carried over from the 2009 Deluxe Edition:

    Slashed Scenes with commentary by Director Joseph Zito (15:21) Is a collection of raw footage and outtakes which gives some behind the scenes production insight but no significant alternate plot or gore content.

    The Lost Ending (3:22) is a sound-free (except for commentary by Zito and actress Kimberly Beck) alternate ending dream sequence that they thankfully did not use, but makes an interesting curio for fans.

    Also included is the film’s Theatrical Trailer (16:9 SD - 1:56)

    Friday the 13th Part V - A New Beginning

    Commentary by Director/Co-Screenwriter Danny Steinman, John Shepherd (Tommy) , Shavar Ross, and horror film aficionado & documentarian Michael Felsher - Recorded for the 2009 deluxe edition DVD release, this commentary feature Steinman, Shepherd, and Ross recorded together with Felsher conferenced in remotely. About 80% of the commentary consists of the participants joking with each other and not answering questions seriously, but it does manage to interlace some actual information about the film’s conception and production between all of the piss-taking. The commentary starts off with the participants asserting that the film is misunderstood and actually among the best in the series, but one gets the sense that by the end of the track they have convinced themselves that it is more a middle of the pack entry.

    Under the heading of “Behind the Scenes” are the following featurettes:

    The Friday the 13th Chronicles, Part V (SD - 5:51) The Part V entry from the 2004 series of "Chronicles" featurettes. This is repeated on the "Killer Bonus" DVD.

    Lost Tales from Camp Blood - Part 5 (7:11) The fifth entry in this series of original horror featurettes from 2009.

    The Crystal Lake Massacre Revisited Part II (10:12) More faux news documentary coverage of events from the films.

    Additionally, we get the film’s original Theatrical Trailer (16:9 SD - 1:59) which probably did not help in the audience goodwill department as it seems to promise more Jason Vorhees than the film delivers.

    Friday the 13th Part VI: Jason Lives

    Under the heading of "Commentary" are:

    Commentary by Writer/Director Tom McLaughlin is an informative solo track from the 2004 DVD that is nearly made redundant by the group commentary on the 2009 DVD described below, but completists will appreciate its inclusion.

    Commentary by Writer/Director Tom McLaughlin, Editor Bruce Green, and Vincent Guastaferro (“Deputy Rick”) This 2009 track covers a lot of the same ground a McLaughlin's 2004 track, but it is a bit more fun with the interaction between the additional participants.

    Under the Heading of “Behind the Scenes” are the following featurettes:

    The Friday the 13th Chronicles, Part VI (4:3 SD - 14:42) The Part VI entry from the 2004 series of "Chronicles" featurettes. This is repeated on the "Killer Bonus" DVD.

    Lost Tales from Camp Blood - Part 6 (7:17) The sixth and final entry in this series of original horror featurettes from 2009.

    The Crystal Lake Massacres Revisited, Part III (9:36) One more faux news documentary covering events in the films.

    Jason Lives: The Making of Friday the 13th, Part VI (12:57) a densely packed informative featurette from the 2009 Deluxe Edition DVD. It crams a lot of information into its 13 minute running time, including interesting perspectives from effects artists and actors not featured in the commentaries.

    Meeting Mr. Vorhees (2:46) is an extensive story reel introduced by McLoughlin that presents an alternate twist ending involving the never before mentioned father of Jason Vorhees.

    Under the heading of “Deleted Scenes” is:

    Slashed Scenes (6:06) includes a bunch of outtakes with some additional gore. Not essential, but interesting for fans. Source is definitely not HD even though it is encoded that way.

    Additionally, we get the film’s original Theatrical Teaser Trailer (16:9 SD - 1:43)

    Friday the 13th Part VII: The New Blood

    Commentary by Director John Carl Buechler, Lar Park Lincoln (“Tina”), and Kane Hodder (“Jason”) This commentary first appeared on the 2009 DVD release of the film. Buechler and Hodder previously recorded a commentary for the 2004 DVD release which is not included here. Lincoln was recorded separately from the others. Hodder (participating via phone) and Buechler interact during their segments. The editing is occasionally jarring, but results in almost no dead spots and an insightful track for fans of the film.

    Under the Heading of “Behind the Scenes” are the following featurettes:

    The Friday the 13th Chronicles, Part VII (4:3 SD - 11:39) The Part VII entry from the 2004 series of "Chronicles" featurettes. This is repeated on the "Killer Bonus" DVD.

    Secrets Galore Behind the Gore - John Carl Buechler on Part VII (4:3 SD - 11:11) Another carryover from the 2004 release, this is also repeated on the "Killer Bonus DVD"

    Jason’s Destroyer The Making of Friday the 13th, Part VII - The New Blood (15:08) is another solid 2009 featurette from a Deluxe Edition DVD. It consists of all new interviews except for those of Lar Park Lincoln which are edited in from the interviews for the 2004 DVD release. There is a lot of discussion of censored gore as well as some glimpses of deleted scenes.

    Mind Over Matter: The Truth About Telekinesis (7:25) Looks at the phenomenon of telekenises from a "real world" perspective with parapsychologist Dr. Barty Taff.

    Makeover by Maddy: Need a Little Touch-Up Work, My Ass (2:43) is a goofy featurette in which actresses Diana Barrows ("Maddy") and Elizabeth Kaitan ("Robin") reunite and go out for a makeover. They work in some Friday the 13th gags into the process. It amounts to an amusing one-time view for fans of the film.

    Under the heading of “Deleted Scenes” are the extensive collection previously available on the 2009 Deluxe Edition DVD with lots of extra gore:

    Slashed Scenes (17:01 w/”Play All”)
    • Slashed Scenes Intro
    • Such a Bitch
    • Car Trouble
    • Knife Kill
    • Rejected
    • Firewood Kill
    • Sleeping Bag Kill
    • Nick the Stalker
    • Nick the Stalker - Part 2
    • Axe Kill
    • If Anything Happens...
    • Maddy’s First Toke
    • Robin’s Fling
    • Robin’s Death
    • Head Crush
    • Eddie’s Death
    • Mrs. Shepard’s Death
    • Dr. Crews’ Death
    • Melissa’s Death
    • Zombie Dad
    • Alternate Ending
    Additionally, we get the film’s original Theatrical Trailer (16:9 SD - 1:39)


    Friday the 13th Part VIII: Jason Takes Manhattan


    Under the heading of “Commentary” are:

    Commentary by Director Rob Hedden This was recorded for the 2004 DVD release of the film, and it provides an interesting and informative look at the technical aspects of the film. This is the commentary of choice for fans looking for detailed behind the scenes information .

    Killer Commentary by Scott Reeves (“Sean”), Jensen Daggett (“Rennie”), and Kane Hodder (“Jason”)
    This "actor reunion" commentary from the 2009 Deluxe Edition DVD is more fun, but less informative that then Hedden commentary, with Hodder once again participating via teleconference.

    Under the Heading of “Behind the Scenes” are the following featurettes:

    The Friday the 13th Chronicles, Part VIII (4:3 SD - 14:32)The Part VIII entry from the 2004 series of "Chronicles" featurettes. This is repeated on the "Killer Bonus" DVD.

    New York Has a New Problem The Making of Friday the 13th, Part VIII - Jason Takes Manhattan (18:02) is carried over from the 2009 Deluxe Edition DVD. It features most of the cast of the film, including several actors whose roles amounted to cameos. It also features some unique deleted footage not included in the deleted scenes extras described below.

    Under the Heading of “Deleted Scenes” is:

    Slashed Scenes (12:56 w/”Play All”) includes a good deal of deleted gore and a deleted subplot or two, resulting in one of the more interesting collections of cut footage in the entire box set collection. No spoilers, but scene titles are:
    • Totally Free
    • Jason Isn’t Real
    • Jim’s Death
    • Bad Book Ideas
    • Helluva Thing to Say
    • Exposition Ho!
    • There She Blows!
    • Darts Gone Awry
    • Sauna Kill
    • Rennie’s Confession
    • I Want Off This Ship
    • Mr. Carlson’s Death
    • Radio Warnings
    • Tamara’s Corpse
    • Get in the Damn Boat
    • Little Jason Mouthwash
    Also included is a Gag Reel (4:55) and the original Theatrical Trailer (SD - 1:19)

    Jason Goes to Hell: The Final Friday


    Additional Scenes: TV Version Alternate Scenes (4:3 SD Video) provides some interesting insight into how the film was padded out for television after the blood and guts were tamed.
    • Diner Scene (3:32)
    • Prank Phone Call (2:35)
    • Cuffin’ Steven (:15)
    • Introduction Scene (:33)
    • Giving Vicki the Baby (:53)
    • Vicki and David (1:05)
    • Vicki Gets to Work (:34)
    • Alone in Jessica’s House (1:46)
    • Steve and Randy’s Fight (1:23)
    Theatrical Trailer (16:9 SD Video - 1:13)

    Jason X


    Commentary by Jim Isaac, Todd Farmer and Noel Cunningham Provides insight from the film's Director, Screenwriter, and Producer on the film's genesis, production, and unique for the franchise effects work.

    Featurette: The Many Lives of Jason Voorhees (16:9 SD Video - 29:56) is an overview of the film series from the perspective of a handful of filmmakers who have worked on various installments, horror movie experts, and fans. There are much more comprehensive overviews of the series on this set.

    Behind the Scenes: By Any Means Necessary: The Making of Jason X (16:9 SD Video - 17:33) is a modest overview of the making of the film that nicely illustrates some of the points made in the commentary about the film's digital effects work.

    Theatrical Trailer (16:9 SD Video - 2:01)


    Freddy vs. Jason

    Commentary by Director Ronny Yu, Robert Englund and Ken Kirzinger is an oddly uninformative track with a lot of Englund ("Freddy Kreuger") hamming it up and praising everything and not nearly enough of Director Ronny Yu and actor Ken Kirzinger ("Jason Vorhees") offering behind the scenes tidbits. Fortunately, this disc includes an impressive array of featurettes as described below, so viewers do not have to stick through this arduous commentary unless they are gluttons for punishment.

    Under the heading of “Behind the Story” are the following featurettes:

    Genesis: Development Hell (16:9 SD - 10:22) looks at the surprisingly arduous path t o the screen for the boogie-man face-off everyone assumed would be coming when New Line acquired the rights to Jason Vorhees in the early 90s.

    On Location: Springwood Revisited (4:3 SD - 14:33) provides an overview of the Springwood sets

    On Location: Cabin Fever (16:9 SD - 6:10) provides an overview of the Crystal Lake sets

    Art Direction: Jason’s Decorating Tips (16:9 SD - 11:33) Looks at the design and appearance of various fantastical locations in the film.

    Stunts: When Push Comes to Shove (16:9 SD - 21:38) Looks at action and pyro stunts in the film

    Make-up Effects: Freddy’s Beauty Secrets (16:9 SD - 6:30) focuses on the film's macabre make-up effects.

    Visual Effects (16:9 SD - 35:23 w/Play All) mixes discussion by the effects team with progressive footage showing the results in various stages of production. This series of featurettes is very thorough and will be of interest to anyone inclined towards the technical side of filmmakeing and effects work.
    • Mommy Kreuger/Counselor Morph
    • Blood Drops
    • Dead-Eyed Girl
    • Wall Morph
    • Jump Rope
    • Shadow Claw
    • Nose Job
    • Dead Trey Walking
    • Freddypillar
    • Pinball Jason
    • Jason’s World
    • Epilogue
    My Summer Vacation: A Visit to Camp Hackenslash (16:9 SD windowboxed to 4:3 - 3:57) provides background on a premiere stunt in Austin Texas where moviegoers saw the film after spending a day at a summer camp.

    Pre-Fight Press Conference - Bally’s Casino Las Vegas, July 15, 2003 (16:9 SD - 3:48) details a goofy stunt promoting the film as if it were a prize fight between Freddy and Jason. And yes, the "Let's Get Ready to Rumble!" guy is there.

    Also included are Deleted Scenes viewable with or without Commentary by Director Ronny Yu & Executive Producer Douglas Curtis (16:16 w/”Play All”) they are mostly short trims removed for redundancy or running time, although there is a fairly substantial "Original Opening":
    • Sheet Freak
    • Taking Lori Home
    • More at School
    • Heather and Billy (Original Opening)
    • Nobody Home
    • At Death’s Door
    • Principal Shaye
    • Party to Forget
    • Dead Trey Walking
    • Eels
    • Too Much Hypnocil
    • Party in the Corn
    • Dream Signs
    • Splitting Up
    • No More Medicine
    • Linderman’s Apology
    • Place Your Bets
    • Original Ending
    • A Promise
    • Kiss From Kia
    • Alternate ending
    How Can I Live by Ill Nino (4:3 SD Video - 3:15) is a forgettable metal song with a horror stalking-themed video.

    Under the heading of “Trailers & TV Spots”:

    Theatrical Trailer (16:9 SD video - 1:12)

    TV Spots (4:3 SD Video - 3:47 w/ “Play All”)
    • Static
    • Meet
    • Slicer
    • Turn
    • Review
    • Dare
    • Freddy Legend
    • Jason Legend
    Friday the 13th (2009)

    Terror Trivia Track with Picture-in-Picture – When activated, this feature mixes context relevant picture in picture behind the scenes video with film franchise trivia that pops up regularly throughout the film's running time.

    The Rebirth of Jason Voorhees (11:24) is a brief featurette looking behind the scenes at the franchise reboot.

    Hacking Back/Slashing Forward (11:41) Features the cast and crew of the remake reflecting on there memories of the original films in the franchise.

    The Seven Best Kills (22:33) – includes an introduction followed by seven 2-3 minute featurettes on various sequences in the film where characters meet their demise. I would normally list out the segment names, but this would include "who dies" spoilers. Avoid even looking at this feature in the extras menu until after you have watched the film at least once.

    Additional Scenes (8:19) includes three substantial deleted scenes from the film including:
    • The origin of how Jason acquired his iconic mask
    • A 911 call to the local police from their perspective
    • An extended final confrontation between Jason and the surviving teen(s)
    BD-Live - The disc connect to the Warner BD-Live Portal, but the only extra content there consists of promos for other films


    Friday the 13th Killer Bonus DVD

    Disc 10 in this collection is the exact same bonus DVD that was included with the 2004 Crystal Lake to Manhattan DVD box set.

    The “Friday the 13th” Chronicles (1:43:22 w/ “Play All”)
    • Part I
    • Part II
    • Part III
    • Part IV
    • Part V
    • Part VI
    • Part VII
    • Part VIII
    Secrets Galore Behind the Gore (23:01 w/ “Play All”)
    • Tom Savini on Part I
    • Tom Savini on Part IV
    • John Carl Buechler on Part VII
    Crystal Lake Victims Tell All! (15:36) features interviews with filmmakers and several actors from the franchise telling anecdotes about their experience.

    Tales from the Cutting Room Floor (17:13) Deleted Extended and Alternate Scenes

    Friday Artifacts and Collectibles (7:01)

    Original Trailers
    • Part I Theatrical Trailer
    • Part II Theatrical Trailer
    • Part III Theatrical Trailer
    • Part IV Theatrical Trailer
    • Part V Theatrical Trailer
    • Part VI Teaser Trailer
    • Part VII Theatrical Trailer
    • Part VIII Theatrical Trailer
    Physical Extras

    The discs are bound in a hardcover book style collection of sleeved pages contained within a tin box with a hinged lid. Knick knacks included in the box include:
    • Crystal Lake Memories 42 page booklet with promotional images and quotes from cast and crew for all of the films except for the 2009 remake. This is condensed and adapted from the more comprehensive book Crystal Lake Memories: The Complete History of Friday The 13th by Peter Bracke.
    • Iron on "Camp Crystal Lake Counselor" patch
    • A pair of cardboard anaglyph 3D glasses decorated with the triangle logo from Jason's hockey mask
    • An elastic band holding together the above listed contents with the following quote from Part 2: "I told the others, They didn't believe me. You're all doomed" Too small for an actual person, this would make a great headband for somebody's American Girl doll.
    Ultraviolet Digital Copies

    Included in the box is a sheet with a code for unlocking Ultraviolet digital copies of all twelve films in this collection. A single code unlocks them all, allowing viewers to access high definition streaming versions of the films on portable devices and set-top boxes connected to streaming services such as Flixster, Vudu, and CinemaNow.

    Overall Rating: 3.5/5

    Warner reached for definitive and came up a bit short with Friday the 13th: The Complete Collection. Films released previously on Blu-ray (Friday the 13th [1980], Friday the 13th Part 2, Friday the 13th Part 3, Freddy Vs. Jason, & Friday the 13th [2009]) are included exactly as they were previously. Films new to Blu-ray are given high definition upgrades (with varying levels of success), and most significant extras from previous DVD released are carried over (including the entire "Killer Bonus" SD DVD from Paramount's 2004 Crystal Lake to Manhattan box set). Many of the extras from the 2009 Deluxe Editions of Parts 4 through 8 are even upgraded to high definition. All of the contents are bundled together in premium packaging including a tin box, hardcover book with "slipcover pages" containing the discs, a "Crystal Lake Memories" 42 page booklet, an iron on "Camp Crystal Lake Counselor" patch, and an elastic band holding the contents inside the box with a pertinent quote from the second film.

    Omissions that slash-o-philes will have to seek elsewhere include:
    • A true Blu-ray 3D presentation of the third film (still not available anywhere)
    • The unrated cut of Jason Goes to Hell
    • The commentary track from the 2004 DVD release of the third film
    • The commentary track from the 2004 DVD release of the seventh film
    • The commentary track that went along with the unrated cut of Jason Goes to Hell
    • Various text, still frame, and DVD-ROM features from the Freddy vs. Jason DVD
    • The separately available on DVD documentary His Name Was Jason, and
    • The separately available on Blu-ray & DVD ridiculously comprehensive documentary Crystal Lake Memories.


    Reviewed by: Ken_McAlinden
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    13 Comments

    The Production Rating: 2.5/5

    2.5?! These are high points in cinematic history and immortal classics. :)

     

    The dark scene in the basement in The Final Chapter has always been very dark so I think that might be a mistake on the part of the film makers rather than the transfer.

     

    Great review! With the sheer number of discs, just listing all the extras and their run times had to be time consuming.

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    Ken_McAlinden
    Oct 05 2013 05:09 AM

    2.5?! These are high points in cinematic history and immortal classics. :)

     

    The dark scene in the basement in The Final Chapter has always been very dark so I think that might be a mistake on the part of the film makers rather than the transfer.

     

    Great review! With the sheer number of discs, just listing all the extras and their run times had to be time consuming.

    Thanks.  Sorry about the less than timely posting, but the set did not arrive until Thursday the 12th and I could not plow through the stuff when my kids were awake.  :o

     

    And for anyone who queued up to see "Jason Takes Manhattan" on its theatrical opening day, feel free to add a star and a half to my "Production" rating. :P

    Nice review, and thanks for confirming everything that is on, and not on this set! I plan to pick this up, but only once it hits a fantastic sale. I want to upgrade my DVD versions, but I'm in no rush, especially since this is missing the uncut version of Jason Goes To Hell. What an inexcusable emission!

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    Jesse Skeen
    Oct 05 2013 12:56 PM

    Including the old red/blue 3D disc of Part 3 rather than re-doing it in real Blu-Ray 3D is an absolute insult. I would have bought this set JUST to get Part 3 in 3D, but they blew it.

      • FoxyMulder likes this

    Including the old red/blue 3D disc of Part 3 rather than re-doing it in real Blu-Ray 3D is an absolute insult. I would have bought this set JUST to get Part 3 in 3D, but they blew it.

     

    I feel exactly the same. I have no love for most of the movies, but I saw the 3D during Part 3's theatrical release, and it was very impressive for a low budget movie. If the only way to get a REAL 3D presentation would be to buy the box, I would have done it, but for anaglyph? No thanks.

    I feel exactly the same. I have no love for most of the movies, but I saw the 3D during Part 3's theatrical release, and it was very impressive for a low budget movie. If the only way to get a REAL 3D presentation would be to buy the box, I would have done it, but for anaglyph? No thanks.

    You would have honestly spent $90 to more or less get one movie? I've seen a number of people say the same thing so I'm not trying to single you out and while I have no doubt that some people would spend that much to get one disc, I think the vast majority of people who I've seen say that would have never bought this set 3-D or no. If there had been a Real 3-D disc, most people would be waiting for an individual release so they can save $60 and not buy 11 movies that they don't really care about (and that's perfectly understandable).

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    WinstonCely
    Oct 05 2013 08:27 PM

    So I guess we'll never get the director's cut of "New Blood?" Sad.  My father worked on that one, and I can remember us watching it on HBO, and him telling me when the kills were going to happen and how they were done (I was only 9 by the time it came to HBO and this was his way of keeping me from getting to freaked out - it worked) and then his befuddlement when the gore wasn't there.

    So I guess we'll never get the director's cut of "New Blood?" Sad.

    No because Paramount destroyed the footage so the closest we'll ever get is the VHS dupe of the work print. Either on the featurette on this set or in the Crystal Lake Memories documentary (I've seen so much about F13 over the past couple of weeks, it's blurring together) they show the Paramount memo ordering the footage destroyed.

    You would have honestly spent $90 to more or less get one movie? I've seen a number of people say the same thing so I'm not trying to single you out and while I have no doubt that some people would spend that much to get one disc, I think the vast majority of people who I've seen say that would have never bought this set 3-D or no. If there had been a Real 3-D disc, most people would be waiting for an individual release so they can save $60 and not buy 11 movies that they don't really care about (and that's perfectly understandable).

     

    I did it often during the laserdisc era. To get a movie I would really want, you bet.

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    Michael Elliott
    Oct 06 2013 06:48 AM

    What I wanna know is why on Earth we haven't gotten a sequel to the remake considering how much money it originally made.

     

    I'm happy with what I've currently got so I'll pass on this set (and especially since I'm sure it'll be revisited in the future).

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    Ken_McAlinden
    Oct 07 2013 12:45 PM

    What I wanna know is why on Earth we haven't gotten a sequel to the remake considering how much money it originally made.

     

    ...

     

    [kidding]Not to get too spoilery, but they probably figured that since so many of the relatable young characters were killed in this film, audiences would have no interest in a sequel centered around a barely human unstoppable faceless killer.[/kidding]

    Including the old red/blue 3D disc of Part 3 rather than re-doing it in real Blu-Ray 3D is an absolute insult. I would have bought this set JUST to get Part 3 in 3D, but they blew it.

     

    caps-a-holic has a comparison of the part 3 Blu-ray to the DVD. Harldly any difference.

    caps-a-holic has a comparison of the part 3 Blu-ray to the DVD. Harldly any difference.

     

    Look at cap one, there is fine detail in the blue t-shirt, fine detail only possible with HD transfers, the DVD completely blurs that detail, in other caps i think the grain structure looks film like instead of a compressed mess.

     

    Also look at the number plate on the car in cap 4, the word "think" and "now" and "placing" "wheels" are a blurry mess in the DVD edition but detailed on the blu ray, this shows me it's a true HD transfer, anything wrong with it is just the filmed look, it would likely work so much better if they had given us a proper 3D blu ray release.