Jump to content



Sign up for a free account to remove the pop-up ads

Signing up for an account is fast and free. As a member you can join in the conversation, enter contests and remove the pop-up ads that guests get. Click here to create your free account.

DVD & Blu-ray Deals

Sale!
  • Today's Best Blu-ray Deals See the latest Blu-ray deals & price drops See The Best Deals

  • Search Reviews


    #

    DVD & Blu-ray Reviews

    • Yentl Blu-ray Review
      Dec 24 2014 02:56 PM
      If the auteur theory hadn’t already been in existence, it would have had to be created for Barbra Streisand’s Yentl. The 1983 introspective musical version o... Read More
    • The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie Blu-ray Review
      Dec 23 2014 02:46 PM
      Cinematic school teachers are almost always charismatic individuals who inspire their charges either through their undeniable skills or through their overwhe... Read More
    • Star Trek: The Next Generation: Season Seven
      Dec 23 2014 01:59 PM
      The final season of The Next Generation is solid Trek, though clearly isn’t the height of glory for the series, as the creative and imaginative quality showe... Read More
    • Inherit the Wind Blu-ray Review
      Dec 22 2014 12:39 PM
      The 1925 Scopes Monkey Trial which pitted Creationists against Evolutionists for the right to teach evolution in public school science classes was dramatized... Read More

    Hardware Reviews


    - - - - -

    Blood and Sand (1941) Blu-ray Review

    Blu-ray Fox

    Jul 10 2013 01:43 PM | Matt Hough in DVD & Blu-ray Reviews
    Almost twenty years after Paramount released its smash hit silent version of Vincente Blasco Ibanez’s Blood and Sand, 20th Century Fox produced a sound and Technicolor remake. For their production, Fox hired the most painterly of directors (Rouben Mamoulian) and cast as their smoldering leading man, Fox’s top matinee idol Tyrone Power to compete with the memories of the silent version’s Rudolph Valentino in one of his most popular roles. The result was a big box-office hit and an Oscar for the film’s majestic and vivid cinematography.

    Title Info:

    • Studio: Fox
    • Distributed By: N/A
    • Video Resolution: 1080P/AVC
    • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
    • Audio: English 1.0 DTS-HDMA (Mono), Spanish 1.0 DD (Mono), French 1.0 DD (Mono)
    • Subtitles: English SDH, Spanish
    • Rating: Not Rated
    • Run Time: 2 Hr. 5 Min.
    • Package Includes: Blu-ray
    • Case Type: keep case
    • Disc Type: BD50 (dual layer)
    • Region: A
    • Release Date: 07/09/2013
    • MSRP: $24.99

    The Production Rating: 3.5/5

    Fiery, impetuous Juan (Rex Downing, Tyrone Power as an adult) dreams of only two things: becoming a world famous matador and coming back to Seville to marry his childhood sweetheart Carmen Espinosa (Ann Todd, Linda Darnell as an adult). It takes ten years of inching his way up the toreador ladder in Madrid for Juan to even get noticed, but his wild, unbridled technique in the ring wins the crowds’ favor and within two years he’s at the top of the game as the most celebrated bullfighter in Madrid. Despite a happy marriage to Carmen, Juan’s head is turned by the brash, sophisticated Dona Sol (Rita Hayworth), and he deserts his home life to live openly with her despite warnings of her fickle nature and her tendency to discard lovers as soon as the next rising star makes an appearance.

    The original 1922 Blood and Sand ran a compact eighty minutes, exactly right for such a slim story, but Jo Swerling’s screenplay pads the slender tale into over two hours, and despite the gorgeous color and the stunning looks of its three leads, the film sags in the middle once Juan achieves tremendous success in the bullring and is riding high. The film’s first twenty-two minutes show us Juan’s early years where the cocky youth sneaks into corrals to fight bulls and cracks a smarmy critic (Laird Cregar) over the head with a bottle for saying something negative about his late father, a former celebrated bullfighter, and the tug-of-war between Juan’s noble wife and his vampish mistress couldn’t be more predictable. On the other hand, director Rouben Mamoulian has used the work of Spanish artists like Goya and El Greco to aid his painterly approach to the film’s expert use of light and shadows: its chiaroscuro-like motifs and striking color cinematography that remain the movie’s most salient feature. He also does a good job blending Tyrone Power’s studio bullring work with actual bullfighting done on location (he even gets some point of view shots from the bull’s eyes that are most effective).

    You’ll look hard and long to find a feature film with three more gorgeous leading players; the fact that they give solid if unexceptional performances is quite beside the point. Tyrone Power does well as the man-child at the mercy of his whims and quite in over his head once he starts mixing with the swells of Madrid. Linda Darnell is full of earnestness as the loving wife who never gives up hope that her husband will return to her. Rita Hayworth on loan from Columbia (and it must have been galling to Darryl Zanuck to have to pay Columbia five times her normal salary in order to borrow her when he could have had her under his own studio contract had he not dismissed her from Fox in 1937) is all flashing eyes and teeth as the “other woman.” She looks magnificently wild tossing her red hair around (though she does about as poor a job miming guitar playing as it’s possible to imagine; one wonders why something wasn’t said to her about it) and proves to be a glib rather than swaggering home wrecker. The film’s best performance is given by legendary silent screen star Alla Nazimova as Juan’s loving but sensible mother. Herself a renowned stage actress, the microphone held no qualms for her, and she’s magnificent throughout. Laird Cregar’s viperish journalist is a bit over-the-top as he practically orgasms during various bull fights, and Lynn Bari as Juan’s self-involved, leech-like sister likewise pushes too forcefully for effect. Much better are J. Carrol Naish as a once-celebrated matador now reduced to serving as Juan’s valet, John Carradine as Juan’s friend Nacional who actually dislikes bull fighting but enjoys the fame it brings him, and Anthony Quinn as Juan’s once friend-now rival Manolo de Palma whose star rises as Juan’s begins to fade. George Reeves makes a brief appearance as one of Dona Sol’s castoff lovers.

    Video Rating: 4.5/5 3D Rating: NA

    The film’s 1.33:1 theatrical aspect ratio is faithfully presented in this 1080p transfer using the AVC codec. Fox’s engineers have done a masterful job resuscitating as much as they can the Technicolor look to the film since the original three-strip negatives were discarded decades ago. They’re not always successful: flesh tones can sometimes appear a little chalky, and color while solid sometimes seems less than lustrous. But sharpness is excellent throughout, and contrast is usually beautifully consistent. Black levels can be superb at their best, and shadow detail is strong, most important in a film that emphasizes its shadows. The film has been divided into 20 chapters.

    Audio Rating: 4.5/5

    The DTS-HD Master Audio 1.0 sound mix will surprise you with its vivid fidelity. Dialogue is always easy to understand and has been mixed perfectly with the film’s sound effects and Alfred Newman’s stalwart score with all working in perfect harmony with the others. What’s more, age-related artifacts like hiss, crackle, pops, and flutter do not pose much of a problem.

    Special Features: 1/5

    Audio Commentary: Richard Crudo, a celebrated director of photography, offers a rather disappointing commentary track. Don’t expect to be given any biographical information about the players, director, or a production history of the film. He analyzes the film purely on the basis of its cinematography and lighting, but along the way he offers up several notable mistakes in facts and a lack of knowledge about other aspects of the history of color cinematography. For example, he states In Cold Blood was the last winner of the black and white cinematography Academy Award before the two were combined into a single category; actually Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf the previous year was the last winner in the separate black and white category; In Cold Blood was nominated – but lost – when the two categories were combined the following year (Bonnie and Clyde won). He calls Black Narcissus a 1950s film. He doesn’t seem to know the history of Technicolor’s Natalie Kalmus and her contract stipulation to have her name in the credits of all Technicolor films, nor does he seem to know that it was a requirement for studios then to hire a Technicolor cameraman like Ray Rennahan if they used Technicolor whether they used the cameraman or not.

    Overall Rating: 3.5/5

    Blood and Sand looks and sounds as good as it possibly can in this latest Blu-ray release in the Fox Studio Classics line. While the audio commentary is a disappointment and the lack of other bonus material for a film this notable is a letdown, the transfer itself is certainly worthy of praise.

    Reviewed by: Matt Hough
    Support HTF when you buy this title:



    13 Comments

    I agree about the film.  Nobody would win, or even be nominated, for their performances.  But the actors, especially Power and Hayworth, are visually dazzling.  Nice use of Spanish music and Alfred Newman's original compositions blend seamlessl

     

    The only special feature was the commentary...accessible via Setup and Extras.  Big whoop.  No trailers, no artwork, no newsreels.  Nothin'.  Nada.

     

    Fox was a HUGE Blu Ray supporter for the reasons it ignores here...that the media has greater capacity than just holding the movie.

     

    .For a film as famous and illustrious as this one to the studio's history, it seems like a one-off dumped just because they had it ready for dumping.

     

    Twilight Time would have done it far better.  But...the price is right.

    Photo
    classicmovieguy
    Jul 10 2013 03:03 PM

    Even a small extra like a Tyrone Power retrospective (like the several mini-featurettes in the Tyrone Power 'Matinee Idol' DVD boxset which Fox released a few years ago) would have been welcome.

    Photo
    classicmovieguy
    Jul 10 2013 03:12 PM

    On a side-note, is this the first classic Fox release to be Region 'A--locked?  Guess this rules me out... sure hope "Letter to Three Wives" isn't locked.

    On a side-note, is this the first classic Fox release to be Region 'A--locked?  Guess this rules me out... sure hope "Letter to Three Wives" isn't locked.

     

    No, quite a few have been marked as Region A (check previous reviews but I know Hello, Dolly! was marked "A" only), but didn't someone in another thread say that some of these may be marked "A" but are actually all-region?

    Photo
    classicmovieguy
    Jul 10 2013 06:51 PM

    DVDBeaver's review also verified it as "Region A".  Yes, I know most of Fox's BD's are marked as "A" only on the back but are in fact region-free, but "Blood and Sand" seems to be genuinely locked this time.

    The " revised" version of Patton is also Zone A locked.

     

    Regarding Matt's point about Columbia loaning Rita Hayworth out to other studios, it has always puzzled me that they didn't do this more often. At her peak Rita made very few movies, only about one a year, probably because Columbia, being a small studio, couldn't afford to finance several major productions in one year. The obvious answer from Columbia's point of view was to lend her to other studios and make a huge, unearned profit. Why didn't they do this? 

    rita is dazzling here.... i remember gasping at her beauty when i first saw this film.

     

    it is hard to believe that she was only 22 years old at this time.

     

    the whole film is well cast, well directed, and beautifully photographed.... one of my top favorites.

      • Everett Stallings likes this

    The " revised" version of Patton is also Zone A locked.

     

    Regading Matt's point about Columbia loaning Rita Hayworth out to other studios, it has always puzzled me that they didn't do this more often. At her peak Rita made very few movies, only about one a year, probably because Columbia, being a small studio, couldn't afford to finance several major production in one year. The obvious answer from Columbia's point of view was to lend her to other studios and make a huge, unearned profit. Why didn't they do this? 

     

    I think sometimes it boiled down to one studio's not wanting their prime assets making tremendous profits for their rivals.

    Viewed last night. Tiresome window-boxed credits, what should be crimson red is mostly orange, and a significant amount of black crush. It is sharp,

    however, and all-told not unpleasant.

    Photo
    Ed Lachmann
    Jul 12 2013 08:39 AM

    I think it looks and sounds fabulous and I'm usually a nitpicker, to be sure.  The colors are dazzling and the image is as sharp as it could be, really nice, in fact,  even though the original elements are no more.  I hope Fox continues down this path, as I will order anything like this immediately.  What great fun it would be to have CAPTAIN FROM CASTILE in blu-ray someday soon.  Next up, 300 SPARTANS, which I pray will look as good as this one does.

    Photo
    Robert Crawford
    Jul 13 2013 05:51 PM

    I think it looks and sounds fabulous and I'm usually a nitpicker, to be sure.  The colors are dazzling and the image is as sharp as it could be, really nice, in fact,  even though the original elements are no more.  I hope Fox continues down this path, as I will order anything like this immediately.  What great fun it would be to have CAPTAIN FROM CASTILE in blu-ray someday soon.  Next up, 300 SPARTANS, which I pray will look as good as this one does.

    Same here, I thought the BD was very good.  It exceeded my expectations.

    Photo
    Robert Crawford
    Jul 13 2013 05:54 PM

    rita is dazzling here.... i remember gasping at her beauty when i first saw this film.

     

    it is hard to believe that she was only 22 years old at this time.

     

    the whole film is well cast, well directed, and beautifully photographed.... one of my top favorites.

    I thought Linda Darnell was more beautiful and she wasn't even 18 yet when she filmed this movie.

    Blood and Sand is a moving tableau rather than a movie; its characters poised and giving stilted performances throughout. You could pause the movie and print screen any moment from it and it would make a beautiful wall hanging. But as pure cinema it lags - badly at times. Have to agree that the color - despite working from shortcomings and a second generation print master - was gorgeous. Rita too - positively luminous.

     

    Power's allure as a heart throb has always baffled me. Okay, granted, I'm not into men but he's always seemed more a pretty boy than beefcake. I suppose he appealed to the same generation of women who found Valentino hot stuff; another effete fellow in my opinion. I wouldn't go so far as to say Power was effete. I think he made out all right in Nightmare Alley - his one departure from the ensconced image everyone had of him and his one absolute flop. Oh well, there's no accounting for taste. Especially if you have none!